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AQA GCSE English Literature Exams - 20th and 23rd May 2013 *OFFICAL THREAD* watch

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    (Original post by moon.fly)
    If Slim does come up for Of Mice and Men, you can link him into the theme of dreams, as he is one of the only characters that appears to have no dream.
    I have a feeling this year his going to be the character they ask about but they usually give a chose of two questions in the first section A. You know for the first question on the crucible Section A do you include context in your answer... E.g. the 17th century which trials and witch hunts in America?
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    Do we all definitely get a clean, unannotated copy of the books in the exam tomorrow??


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    Does anyone have any idea about who is likely to come up in TKAM? I know there's a huge range of characters but it'd be nice to focus my final preparations on a small minority!
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    Mr Pip? Am I the only one reading this book, literally have no idea how to critically explore this book.
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    for Inspector Calls does anyone have points on Eva Smith she could come up :confused:
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    (Original post by nagi96)
    Do we all definitely get a clean, unannotated copy of the books in the exam tomorrow??


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    Yep we should do...unless the school mess up
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    (Original post by nagi96)
    Do we all definitely get a clean, unannotated copy of the books in the exam tomorrow??


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    yes
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    (Original post by iceangel8)
    for Inspector Calls does anyone have points on Eva Smith she could come up :confused:
    I just did an essay on Eva Smith, perhaps a little bit short though I don't know

    How does Priestley present Eva Smith in the play An Inspector Calls? How does he make you respond as you do by the way he writes?

    PLAN
    F Eva never appears; the poor unseen; Birlings trapped in bubble of wealth
    Represents any poor “millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths”
    Needs Inspector to speak for her; the wealthy so snobbish they will only listen to their ‘equals’
    S Eva causes family more trouble as play progresses; poor will have their comeuppance
    L “swallowed a lot of strong disinfectant … she was in great agony … she died.”

    Despite her central role in the play An Inspector Calls, Priestley places Eva Smith below even the housemaid Edna by never affording her the dignity of an appearance on stage. Set in the “comfortable, but not cosy and homelike” lair of the wealthy Birlings, it is fitting that Eva never enters the house, for it conveys the idea that the Birlings are trapped in a bubble of wealth, oblivious to the plight and struggle of those less fortunate outside. Priestley could be using “not cosy and homelike” in order to suggest that the Birlings live a comfortable lifestyle, but through their desperation to occupy the highest tier of society have forgone any warmth, kindness or compassion, hence almost making their house akin to a typical marble-floored, echoey dungeon often inhabited by the villain in any fairytale.

    Priestley deliberately fails to provide any specific details about Eva Smith, other than her name and the fact she was “pretty”, so that he could use Eva as a representation of all the poor in society (the Inspector late in the play states that “there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths still left with us”). Combined with Eva Smith’s lack of an appearance on stage, this perhaps reflects Priestley’s own view that the working class were underrepresented in pre Great War Britain, their struggles and poverty drowned out by the louder babblings of the more influential upper classes. Eva Smith is only granted a voice through the Inspector, suggesting a snobbishness to the wealthy which prevents them noticing those they class as inferior (“claiming elaborate fine feelings and scruples that were simply absurd in a girl in her position”), until brought up in such a way it directly disadvantages them (in this case, when an Inspector arrives, causing them to believe they will be at the centre of a public scandal).

    It is structurally interesting that Priestley should order the family members’ revelations in increasing severity; in this way, Eva Smith comes back to haunt the Birling household more and more as the play progresses, perhaps representing Priestley’s prediction that the status of society at that time was unsustainable; that the working class would be bound to have their comeuppance in time, and gain a louder voice, eventually becoming equals with those of a superior class in every way but wealth.

    In summary, Priestley uses Eva Smith as a representation of the working class, and as a way to suggest his own views about society in pre Great War Britain, as well as simply the victim of the Birlings’ selfish actions. It is noteworthy that Priestley writes that Eva “died in great agony”, after swallowing “a lot of strong disinfectant”. “Great agony” could simply be seen as a few hours extension upon the agony of Eva’s struggle to survive and “miserable existence”, and choosing to have Eva die as a result of poisoning from “disinfectant” perhaps further reflects the horrible disdain and even disgust with which the wealthy looked down upon the poor in Britain at the time the play was set.
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    (Original post by iceangel8)
    for Inspector Calls does anyone have points on Eva Smith she could come up :confused:
    It's unlikely that she will come up, but just in case...

    -The name 'Eva' bears various references, however the two in siginifcance to the themes and presentation of the play are that is similar to 'Eve' (the first women from the Old Testament of the Bible) which suggests that she is the representation of all women and Eva Braun (Hitler's wife and partner) as the cause of death for both was similar.

    -Whether or not she was real doesn't matter, she is merely a device used by the Inspector to convey to the Birling family the importance of responsibility.

    - She acts as a mother like figure towards Eric, as he mentions that she 'treated me like a kid, even though I was nearly as old as she was', which links to the true importance and value of her character.

    - Her 'innocent' presentation, victimisation and representation of her character is effective as this makes the audience value others more, which brings them closer together as 'one body', making the playwright successful in his aims.
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    (Original post by Ryan075)
    x
    I wrote this a while ago so this might be a weak essay, but what grade would you give this and how could I improve?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Question: "The predilection for minding other people's business was time honoured among
    the people of Salem, and it undoubtedly created many of the suspicions which were to lead
    the coming madness." What attitudes towards other people do you consider fed the
    'madness' of the witch hunts and how does Miller represent these attitudes? (30 marks)

    Answer: The Crucible explores the accusations with emotions and depth via the
    representations of the attitudes surrounding the issue of the witchcraft trials. It is evidently
    displayed by the initial spur and rumours that fuelled Abigail's quest to the guilty conscience
    of Hale who discovers how mad the trials really were.

    The scene begins with Parris “evidently” in prayer, suggesting that his appearance was
    critical to him- he wanted to seem as if he had not lost any hope but suspiciously, he is
    “overcome with sobs” suggesting that he does not feel his daughter will escape her paralysis
    any time soon. The reputation of other characters such as Danforth who, with a tinge of
    conceit, asked “do you know who I am?” and his refusal in postponing the hangings suggest
    that he did not want to look weak. After all, he believes that the court is guided by God and
    suspects that there is a desire lurking amongst the people who “undermine this court.”
    Parris believes that the town was trying to remove him from the church as there was “a
    faction and a party” and clearly states that he has “many enemies.” This may be considered
    to have caused the divisions amongst the townspeople as Parris constantly tries to protect
    his reputation. For example, he “unwillingly” says that he saw them dancing These
    statements all point to the conclusion that the fight for the protection of reputation and
    stature fuelled the witchcraft trials as the adverb “unwillingly” evokes that there was some
    restraint in revealing the truth since it would be a sign of weakness in the “fortress” of the
    law and any attack on the court was an attack on God.

    Abigail had other intentions in driving the witchcraft trials. Her plan was to hang Elisabeth
    Proctor and then marry John Proctor who had committed adultery with her. She is first
    described as having an “endless capacity for dissembling.” “Endless” and “dissembling” both
    suggest that she is very capricious and potentially manipulative which we later realize is
    true. For instance, first Abigail “lowers her eyes” when she is being berated but this is not
    only a sign of guilt but also a sign or deceit and betrayal. She then later on bellows “in
    terror” and asserts that he “mistake” himself. She is willing to question his authority and
    when realizes she can have power and higher authority (after all, she would be considered
    to be near the bottom o the social hierarchy), she declares that she was enraptured by the
    Devil and yells, “I want the light of God,” She is also enshrouded in a “pearly light” and the
    terms “pearly” and “light” are ironic since her actions are far from godly. The term “pearly”
    causes her to seem innocent and inspired and this is a fine example of she managed to trick
    the community that she was guided by God. However, her main purpose was to try and
    have Goody Proctor hanged which occurs in Act 2 and albeit we first think that she may be
    becoming hysterical, her desire of power becomes evident when she begins the accusations
    with rising “glee.” The term “glee” suggests that not only is she enjoying firing these
    accusations but her profound sense of belonging is overwhelming as suddenly, she has
    become a girl of great significance in the play. In fact, she becomes so influential that she
    begins to intimidate one of the most ruthless, heartless and callous man in the book-
    Danforth- as Abigail’s presence results in his “weakening” and “apprehensive” approach he
    is frightened o her and her “open threat.”
    The law has been symbolized as being “heavy” with Cheever remarking that he carried its
    “tonnage” on his back. Corey was also pressed to death in Act 2 and these symbols all
    personify the law as being gruff and solemn- its word was final and any attempt at refuting
    it was futile, even if you had a testimony of “ninety-two” names. However, despite the
    grueling witchcraft trials the benevolent characters in the play remain fearless. For instance,
    Rebecca Nurse remains loyal to God and her good courteous reputation is not undermined.
    Proctor considers her to be a “saint” and as her face brightens when she sees Proctor, he
    “turns his face to the wall.” This stage direction indicates the remorse and guilt proctor feels
    and does not want to gaze at this woman. This is synonymous to a guilty person being afraid
    of praying to God despite the fact that still “sits like a great bird.” His further questioning to
    God asking “who is John Proctor?” as he tries to wrestle with his conscience eventually leads
    them to see “some shred of goodness.” Rebecca also states that “I’ve had no breakfast”
    (indicating that her concern for this mundane matter meant that the hanging was of a lesser
    importance) and Giles Corey, whose final words were “more weight” all portray their
    loyalty, confidence and faithfulness to God. They are iconic characters in the play who did
    not seem to fear the trials since they knew that they were not witches, so had no reason to
    lie and confess.

    The play depicts the various attitudes the people had from the issue of Danforth and Parris
    both being egotistic about their reputation and Danforth’s suspicion to those “who dared to
    rise against the law” are evident examples of how the trials were not merely inescapable
    but also an opportunity for the girls in particular to execute their revenge on others. I have
    felt very touched and influenced by the play since it has depicted these vital issues in an
    astonishing way and we can clearly see how Miller completely opposed these horrors, as
    well as the rise of McCarthysm in his life.

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    (Original post by DanyalB)
    I have a feeling this year his going to be the character they ask about but they usually give a chose of two questions in the first section A. You know for the first question on the crucible Section A do you include context in your answer... E.g. the 17th century which trials and witch hunts in America?
    nope you only get A04 (context) marks in the second question (omam, tkamb etc)
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    For all those doing Of Mice and Men, in Jan 2012 the part b question stated “using the rest of the novel, how does steinbeck present the lives of ranch workers at the time? Could someone help me with this please, Thanks

    * And also do you think another setting question may come up this year?
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    Hi,

    You can probably tell that most people think that the natural world or slim will come up in OMAM

    So why don't we share context ideas so we can all come out with an A*


    I will start of:

    Natural World-Context- "periscope head moved from side to side". The "side to side" is ironic as it was important to turn your head around to keep cautious in such an individualistic society where all the itinerant workers would think on just survival.

    Thanks

    Lets see how many perceptive points on context we can gather
    Come on
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    I'm doing Moonlight on the Tides, Short Stories and Of Mice and Men... I'm not really worried as I've had an amazing teacher and have had lots of practise.
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    Is this an okay paragraph on Slim? I'm struggling to do close analysis, and I don't know if it follows a good structure. Feedback would be appreciated

    Steinbeck uses Slim's character to present ideas about a problematic society. For example, Slim says "Maybe everybody in the whole damned world is scared of each other". This is because Slim finds it odd that George and Lennie travel together, indicating that it was very rare. This could also convey ideas about George and Lennie's friendship, showing how special it is. Also, Slim is presenting the theme of loneliness and isolation, which will occur as a result of people working alone. The word "damned" also suggests there is a curse on society.

    I also wanted to add in the point about how Slim works on the ranch, even though he seems intelligent and good at working, and I could link that to The Great Depression and the lack of jobs because of the Wall Street Crash.
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    what grade would this structure get?

    4 paragraphs for an inspector calls
    Point:
    Evidence:
    Explain:
    Elaborate:
    Effect on audience:
    Personal opinion and refer to question:


    three paragraphs for of mice and men passage(a) and 4 for part (b)

    Point:
    Evidence:
    Explain:
    Elaborate:
    Effect on reader:
    Historical context:
    personal opinion and refer to question
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    (Original post by HASSANATOR)
    Hi,

    You can probably tell that most people think that the natural world or slim will come up in OMAM

    So why don't we share context ideas so we can all come out with an A*


    I will start of:

    Natural World-Context- "periscope head moved from side to side". The "side to side" is ironic as it was important to turn your head around to keep cautious in such an individualistic society where all the itinerant workers would think on just survival.

    Thanks

    Lets see how many perceptive points on context we can gather
    Come on
    about how the snake is small which links to lennie's second name
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    How is section B of paper 1 meant to be answered, two separate essays or one which is combined?
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    (Original post by HASSANATOR)
    Hi,

    You can probably tell that most people think that the natural world or slim will come up in OMAM

    So why don't we share context ideas so we can all come out with an A*


    I will start of:

    Natural World-Context- "periscope head moved from side to side". The "side to side" is ironic as it was important to turn your head around to keep cautious in such an individualistic society where all the itinerant workers would think on just survival.

    Thanks

    Lets see how many perceptive points on context we can gather
    Come on
    The peace and tranquility of the water hole in Chapter 1 create juxtaposition with the bunkhouse and its confinement. This makes the bunkhouse seem like a worse place to be in comparison with the freedom of the water hole.
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    I'm doing The Crucible and Of Mice & Men for the modern texts paper. For the poetry paper, character and voice.
 
 
 
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