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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    I'm going to Cornell to do my PhD starting in August. Just had my US visa approved on Wednesday.
    What are you going to work on?
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    ]
    You can't possibly know at this moment where you would want to go, unless you know exactly what you want to research already and the strengths of each university in that research. The most important criteria for choosing your PhD is the potential advisors/actual advisor who admitted you at the university, and also its research in the specific field you want to go into. For example while MIT, Berkeley and Stanford commonly seem high-and-mighty and all that for CompSci, they were actually quite low on my list compared to Carnegie Mellon or Cornell as they did not have a good specialisation in the research direction I wanted to do. (Although they would have been nice to get into for pride points But that's another thing, universities tend not to take students either if they pursue directions that are uninteresting to their faculty.)
    I'm a prospective Emmanuel student, clearly I've already started my research
    Spoiler:
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    Lol jk :lol:


    Hmm I suppose so! I have no idea what I would want to do if I did end up doing one! Even now I can't decide which I like more: Infinite Series, Infinite Integrals, Prime numbers or Cosmology :lol:
    Well I was being a bit bored of the UK, and the funding situation is much better in the US, so that's why I went instead of staying. It's not really a gap "year" though, in the US PhDs tend to be five years or more, averaging six, whereas in the UK pretty much you are kicked out after four years maximum (you are expected to finish in three) if you still haven't graduated. If you ever decide that this is too much of a slog, doing Part I - II in Cambridge and then a Master's in the US would achieve what you are saying
    Six years is insane! Even four years is insane! Why so long?!?! :eek: Surely you will be doing the same amount of work as you would do in an English PhD? Mmm yeah I might do that... the only thing would be the tuition fees though

    I do want to do a PhD though (unless my life skews in an unexpected direction). I think that, even if I didn't make it as as academic or couldn't find a decent enough lectureship, it would give my life great meaning, not only to make a contribute to human knowledge (however small!) but to have the opportunity to let my mind explore something I'm really interesting! (It still seems insanely awesome that people actually get paid for doing pure maths :eek: :eek: )

    Btw, what's the non-academic side of Emma like? Is the bar and pool good? Are the ducks as friendly as they claim?:ahee:
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    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    What are you going to work on?
    Theoretical foundations of programming languages pertaining to type theory and category theory.

    (Original post by Jkn)
    Six years is insane! Even four years is insane! Why so long?!?! :eek: Surely you will be doing the same amount of work as you would do in an English PhD? Mmm yeah I might do that... the only thing would be the tuition fees though
    Essentially the amount of papers you need to have published before you graduate is a requirement in the US, but not in the UK (but that's not to say some incredibly industrious UK PhD students couldn't publish the equivalent amount in only three years). At some places in the UK you can graduate from a PhD without ever having a paper published in a prestigious conference or journal. Also the US admits PhD students on the basis that they are initially working towards a Master's, and if they can pass a certain number of qualifying exams (many of which the new students are able to pass without any further study) to ensure breadth of knowledge then you are formally a PhD student. You may take a leisurely pace in fulfilling those requirements before doing significant research (although you do need to do enough in order to satisfy some advisor who has to pay your stipend). In general in the UK you are admitted on the assumption you can do research already, and if it's obvious you cannot after three or four years then you are just kicked out.

    (Original post by Jkn)
    Btw, what's the non-academic side of Emma like? Is the bar and pool good? Are the ducks as friendly as they claim?:ahee:
    Emmanuel is a really active and friendly college, so you'll have no problem in socialising and finding friends The bar is really cheap (if not the cheapest) due to it being student-run, and it's much nicer in decor than the other well-known student-run bar (Sidney). The ducks normally stay out of your way, except during Easter Term (right now) when people eat meals out on the paddock and the ducklings come and steal the food.
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    Theoretical foundations of programming languages pertaining to type theory and category theory.
    I think Cambridge is one of the best in the world for that.
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    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    I think Cambridge is one of the best in the world for that.
    In category theory, certainly, due to the Maths department, but in the computer science side of it it's more uncertain. Plus the Cambridge Programming Languages and Logic group are working on projects that are a bit too devoid of applications. It's why so many practical PL people in Cambridge work with Microsoft Research on top/instead of the Lab.
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    In category theory, certainly, due to the Maths department, but in the computer science side of it it's more uncertain. Plus the Cambridge Programming Languages and Logic group are working on projects that are a bit too devoid of applications. It's why so many practical PL people in Cambridge work with Microsoft Research on top/instead of the Lab.
    What do you think of the CST? I didn't like it.
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    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    What do you think of the CST? I didn't like it.
    A mixed bag of what the faculty happens to be interested in, which always has that feeling of being rushed and ad-hoc. Regardless, it still holds up on its own against courses in other universities in general, but there are some glaring weaknesses (albeit there are a few strengths as well). Personally four years ago I thought JMC at Imperial would be a better course, and I'm more convinced I was right as time goes on.
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    A mixed bag of what the faculty happens to be interested in, which always has that feeling of being rushed and ad-hoc. Regardless, it still holds up on its own against courses in other universities in general, but there are some glaring weaknesses (albeit there are a few strengths as well). Personally four years ago I thought JMC at Imperial would be a better course, and I'm more convinced I was right as time goes on.
    The is very much my feeling. I feel the course feels more like a hodgepodge of unrelated courses thrown together, rather than a coherent, progressive course like Maths or Natsci.

    I also thought that JMC would have been better - in fact I was going to switch but things didn't turn out that way.
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    Plus the Cambridge Programming Languages and Logic group are working on projects that are a bit too devoid of applications.
    That is just wrong
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    Problem 149*

    0^0
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    And the negging's for....?
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    (Original post by TH3-FL45H)
    And the negging's for....?
    I'm more curious what is the upvote for.
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    (Original post by jack.hadamard)
    I'm more curious what is the upvote for.
    What's the negging for
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    (Original post by TH3-FL45H)
    What's the negging for
    The layout's all wrong.
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    (Original post by metaltron)
    The layout's all wrong.
    What?
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    (Original post by TH3-FL45H)
    What?
    Ask stupid questions, get stupid answers.
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    (Original post by metaltron)
    Ask stupid questions, get stupid answers.
    And if I don't know what the negging's for?
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    Not sure why this hasn't been posted, perhaps there are not enough physicists on this thread! This is a fun thing to try so if you've had a course on it please don't type it out from memory

    Problem 150
    *

    i) Prove, from first principles, the relation between the relativistic mass and the rest mass of an object.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    m_{rel.}=\frac{m_0}{\sqrt{1-\frac{v^2}{c^2}}}

    ii) Hence derive Einstein's mass-energy equivalence equation.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    E=mc^2

    Note: I have put the equations in spoiler-brackets so as not to lead you into thinking that algebraic manipulation is satisfactory and also not to annoy undergraduates who may be more accustomed to seeing each formula is far more sophisticated forms

    Also, I like to think the aim of this thread is to share ideas so please justify and derive fully (e.g. please don't put "using the Lorentz factor" or anything like that)


    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    Essentially the amount of papers you need to have published before you graduate is a requirement in the US, but not in the UK (but that's not to say some incredibly industrious UK PhD students couldn't publish the equivalent amount in only three years). At some places in the UK you can graduate from a PhD without ever having a paper published in a prestigious conference or journal. Also the US admits PhD students on the basis that they are initially working towards a Master's, and if they can pass a certain number of qualifying exams (many of which the new students are able to pass without any further study) to ensure breadth of knowledge then you are formally a PhD student. You may take a leisurely pace in fulfilling those requirements before doing significant research (although you do need to do enough in order to satisfy some advisor who has to pay your stipend). In general in the UK you are admitted on the assumption you can do research already, and if it's obvious you cannot after three or four years then you are just kicked out.

    Emmanuel is a really active and friendly college, so you'll have no problem in socialising and finding friends The bar is really cheap (if not the cheapest) due to it being student-run, and it's much nicer in decor than the other well-known student-run bar (Sidney). The ducks normally stay out of your way, except during Easter Term (right now) when people eat meals out on the paddock and the ducklings come and steal the food.
    Hmm, do you think that would help launch someone into an academic career more than the UK PhD then? Sounds far better in the US tbh!

    Out of interest, how significant a contribution must be made to warrant a PhD? Because it seems unlikely that everyone with a PhD has been able to really "discover" something new (or perhaps I am being incredibly naive).

    Ahhh that all sounds awesome Is it true that the maths students have to go in a week before freshers, btw?
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    (Original post by Jkn)
    Hmm, do you think that would help launch someone into an academic career more than the UK PhD then? Sounds far better in the US tbh!
    Well you could just do a postdoc if you find that you still need to get a few more papers under your belt, and those usually pay a larger stipend than when you were a PhD student! It works out more or less in the end for the same amount of research done.

    (Original post by Jkn)
    Out of interest, how significant a contribution must be made to warrant a PhD? Because it seems unlikely that everyone with a PhD has been able to really "discover" something new (or perhaps I am being incredibly naive).
    The contribution must be novel, but it can be very very very small. The PhD is the qualification which precisely shows you are capable of discovering something new, even if that new thing is insignificant. Remember it's supposed to certify the start of your research career, not the end of your academic life even though it might seem that way. The significant stuff comes later when you are a proper researcher. This explains it quite well.

    (Original post by Jkn)
    Ahhh that all sounds awesome Is it true that the maths students have to go in a week before freshers, btw?
    Yes at some colleges.... and Emmanuel is indeed one of them. It's called "geek week".
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    (Original post by ukdragon37)
    Yes at some colleges.... and Emmanuel is indeed one of them.
    :rofl: I don't know whether they're lucky or unlucky

    Edit: :ninja:
 
 
 
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