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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    If someone who's paying for their education doesn't deem a session worth going to, then they should have the right not to attend (though I think the medical school should have the right to use that information should a student fail). I think regular formatives would be a better solution in terms of identifying those who're struggling, which is the excuse my school uses for registering people.
    The 'someone' who is paying the bulk of your education (i.e. the Government) determines what they want you to go to: in this case, a minimum of 5500 hours worth of full time education to register as a medical practitioner.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    The 'someone' who is paying the bulk of your education (i.e. the Government) determines what they want you to go to: in this case, a minimum of 5500 hours worth of full time education to register as a medical practitioner.
    I understand that, but the student is the single largest stakeholder in this cost. Each member of the tax-paying public (i.e., the government) pays a negligible amount towards this.

    I just think there needs to be less of a 'high school' attitude towards medical education. I think registers for anything other than fire safety are a waste of time (unless they'll be used should a student fail). There are better ways to record whether people are struggling or in some way not progressing as well as they should be.

    Either way, those 5500 hours should be learning opportunities worth going to and to push towards that medical schools themselves need to be held to account more than they are now.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    I understand that, but the student is the single largest stakeholder in this cost. Each member of the tax-paying public (i.e., the government) pays a negligible amount towards this.

    I just think there needs to be less of a 'high school' attitude towards medical education. I think registers for anything other than fire safety are a waste of time (unless they'll be used should a student fail). There are better ways to record whether people are struggling or in some way not progressing as well as they should be.

    Either way, those 5500 hours should be learning opportunities worth going to and to push towards that medical schools themselves need to be held to account more than they are now.
    Agreed.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    The 'someone' who is paying the bulk of your education (i.e. the Government) determines what they want you to go to: in this case, a minimum of 5500 hours worth of full time education to register as a medical practitioner.

    I dread to think how many of those hours are wasted because the placements are not appropriate for students, or waiting around for teaching to happen. Medical education needs to reform towards nursing training - you should become part of te team, imbed and work as a useful part of the team rather than oscillating around placements hoping to learn via osmosis. Much depends on the student tbh.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    I dread to think how many of those hours are wasted because the placements are not appropriate for students, or waiting around for teaching to happen. Medical education needs to reform towards nursing training - you should become part of te team, imbed and work as a useful part of the team rather than oscillating around placements hoping to learn via osmosis. Much depends on the student tbh.
    IIRC digitalis followed this line of argument well a few months ago when he compared later year UK placements to the kind of thing that happens with the 4th yr US students who do seem to have a much more integrated involvement.
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    One thing that really pisses me off is the thought that the same consultants who say "I'm busy, don't interrupt me. Sit in the corner, I'm not teaching you" will most probably be taking credit for teaching in their appraisals etc
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    Why am I learning about the different receptors on the brain that alcohol works on?

    DO NOT CARE.
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    how ethanol produces it's effects are pretty interesting, especially bearing in mind how shoddy an explanation effects at a cellular level are when trying to bring them together to explain the behavioral phenotype. maybe I'm just sad
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    how ethanol produces it's effects are pretty interesting, especially bearing in mind how shoddy an explanation effects at a cellular level are when trying to bring them together to explain the behavioral phenotype. maybe I'm just sad
    Well you do have a particularly unhealthy obsessive with metabolism as well...
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    If people honestly need a lecture to be registered just so it makes them go then that's a bit pathetic really.
    Lectures should be relevant, appropriate and interesting. That would make people go.

    Some lectures are useless and it pisses me off when people think you should attend everything irrespective of what it actually is.

    I'm not in it for a 100 % attendance and a pat on the head: I want a high quality education and would like to be respected as an adult rather than as a school pupil.
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    Todays lecture series:

    Economics for medical students
    Mental Capacity Act (for the 2nd time this term and the trillionth time since starting medical school)
    Investigations in psychiatry (already covered at length)

    Suffice to say I didn't go in, and have practically finished my SSC as a result. So very glad that lectures aren't compulsory.
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    (Original post by clarusblue)
    One thing that really pisses me off is the thought that the same consultants who say "I'm busy, don't interrupt me. Sit in the corner, I'm not teaching you" will most probably be taking credit for teaching in their appraisals etc
    Give them -ve feedback, was attached to a consultant who had no inpatients, he took 3 weeks off (bearing in mind our blocks our 7 wks long, and week one was just full of lectures for one of our blocks so that was 50% of my clinical attachment) and he only had two part time regs. I don't blame him but moreso the medical school for allocating us to consultants who can't provide us with the best teaching. Other medics were paired to one consultant - but three of us got our own. I'd much rather have been paired with student and attached to a consultant who actually had inpatients.

    So I just left and became 'adopted' by this amazing hepatology reg who took me on all his ward rounds, let me sit in on everything and asked me to examine each patient he saw. Then my original consultant got a bit p***ed off with me for disappearing. But meh, I've only got a 6 week window into that speciality and I might never do it again, so I am going to get as involved as I can.

    Well to be honest, its your learning - so take initiative. If they won't teach you, find someone who will.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    It's ridiculous.

    (1) If the lectures aren't worth going to then the school needs to sort the problem out, not force students to go to them.
    (2) Non-compulsory lectures don't result in nobody going. There'll always be an audience (though it might be small at times).

    I actually don't like the concept of registration to monitor attendance at all. We pay tuition fees; students need to get a more consumer-based mentality I think. If someone who's paying for their education doesn't deem a session worth going to, then they should have the right not to attend (though I think the medical school should have the right to use that information should a student fail). I think regular formatives would be a better solution in terms of identifying those who're struggling, which is the excuse my school uses for registering people.
    *repped*

    Totally - I agree with this fully - I go to stuff that's worthwhile - and as a result do quite well and it lets me do my voluntary work on the side.

    Why should I be forced to go to some boring MDT or teaching session I know never happens etc - when I could be doing something productive.

    If I fail my exams then maybe I should be in for everything but so far I'm pretty ok.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    .
    Hello! Been a while, was just wondering, which iBSc did you do? I have immunology and primary health as my choices but I can't decide which one to put first. Does having a clinical one help with ST applications? Does having a more 'scientific' one make you 'look better'? Any help appreciated (from anyone!)
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    (Original post by Woody.)
    Hello! Been a while, was just wondering, which iBSc did you do? I have immunology and primary health as my choices but I can't decide which one to put first. Does having a clinical one help with ST applications? Does having a more 'scientific' one make you 'look better'? Any help appreciated (from anyone!)
    Forgive me for sounding patronising (), but how on earth are you at iBSc applications already?? I thought you were still a fresher... Now I feel old :getmecoat:

    AFAIK clinical or science based won't make a difference. Pick the subject you enjoy the most rather than which you think you *might* gain more from - the jobs system is changing so frequently there's little point trying to guess what will look better in a few years time.
    • PS Helper
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    You know, looking for unique shoes isn't that productive in a crowd this big
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Forgive me for sounding patronising (), but how on earth are you at iBSc applications already?? I thought you were still a fresher... Now I feel old :getmecoat:

    AFAIK clinical or science based won't make a difference. Pick the subject you enjoy the most rather than which you think you *might* gain more from - the jobs system is changing so frequently there's little point trying to guess what will look better in a few years time.
    I'm a second year and we are obliged to do ours in third year so it's all got to be organised! Technically the deadline has gone, and I'm just being an idiot and having second thoughts!
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    (Original post by Woody.)
    I'm a second year and we are obliged to do ours in third year so it's all got to be organised! Technically the deadline has gone, and I'm just being an idiot and having second thoughts!
    Your second thoughts about which medical school to pick seem to have worked out pretty well for you, so I wouldn't say you're an idiot for having them
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    Your second thoughts about which medical school to pick seem to have worked out pretty well for you, so I wouldn't say you're an idiot for having them
    It is the exact same situation! However I have no idea whether I would've enjoyed Aberdeen more than UCL, it's certainly been good being only an hour from home. I hope I become more decisive come clinics...
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    (Original post by Supermassive_muse_fan)
    Give them -ve feedback, was attached to a consultant who had no inpatients, he took 3 weeks off (bearing in mind our blocks our 7 wks long, and week one was just full of lectures for one of our blocks so that was 50% of my clinical attachment) and he only had two part time regs. I don't blame him but moreso the medical school for allocating us to consultants who can't provide us with the best teaching. Other medics were paired to one consultant - but three of us got our own. I'd much rather have been paired with student and attached to a consultant who actually had inpatients.

    So I just left and became 'adopted' by this amazing hepatology reg who took me on all his ward rounds, let me sit in on everything and asked me to examine each patient he saw. Then my original consultant got a bit p***ed off with me for disappearing. But meh, I've only got a 6 week window into that speciality and I might never do it again, so I am going to get as involved as I can.

    Well to be honest, its your learning - so take initiative. If they won't teach you, find someone who will.
    that example i gave was of a friend's consultant.

    the feedback system doesn't really work in our med school tbh, they only ask for feedback after they've done some decent teaching with you.

    the guy who told my friend and his partner to sit in a corner and not bother him also told them that if they're not happy, "not to whinge to med school about him" as the last groups did and he's pissed off by it. they will complain if they have reason to but no chance will anything change.
 
 
 
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