Does the UK have a pledge of allegiance? Watch

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jumpingjesusholycow
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#81
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#81
(Original post by Tut.exe)
part of your rights and your freedom is taking responsibility or did you not get taught in school about this? Well, I was in a crap school back in the philippines compared to the 'high class' education here in Britain but I definitely remember that for every right you have, you have a responsibility over it... **** i was in a 3rd world getting taught about this. The allegiance t your country is like making a promise that you will take responsibility as a citizen to your country... and take part of the responsibility to uphold those freedom and rights that the country gives to you.
and by the way, do you guys know there is an option where you can take the oath without mentioning God?
I don't have to make any such oath if I don't want to and I would never make any such oath. It's nothing but a nationalistic chant and my saying it or not doesn't make any more resonsible than otherwise having not said it. I have NO allegiance to a strip of land anyway and you'd have to slit my throat before getting me to chant your ****.
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Azog 150
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#82
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#82
(Original post by A short guy)
Every morning before the announcements start at school we have to stand up face the flag put our hand on our heart and say the pledge of allegiance.

Ive had to do this ever since I started school and I was wondering does the Uk do this to?

You do, but there is only a few situations where you have to (e.g. gaining citezenship or in certain jobs). I have never had to do one myself.

Patriotism in the UK is a lot more low-key then in the US. We usually make jokes about how US students must make a pledge every morning etc, and we find the whole in-your-face flag flying thing quite amusing too. People here don't really fell like they have to prove anything.
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Cirsium
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#83
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#83
(Original post by kamc)
At my elementary school we had to recite it every morning and afternoon. As 1st graders we had no idea what it meant, only that we had to do it. I remember one kid refusing and he was sent to the principles office.
I like the idea of a school having a principles office where people have to go when they disagree with something on principle (as opposed to a principal's office)... it seems rather appropriate for refusing to pledge.
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JoshJGordon
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#84
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#84
Pledges of alliance in schools is just silly.

I understand oaths when joining the military and so on, just to make you say in words that you understand what you are doing and why you are doing it.

But being forced to stand a recite a passage of allegiance to a flag seems too much like religion to me.

External displays of patriotism seems to be more prevalent in 'younger' countries, here we just get on with our lives.
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L i b
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#85
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(Original post by WharfedaleTiger)
I've never taken a pledge like that-I think its sort of understood that I have allegiance to this country....

That said I wouldn't be able to pledge allegiance to the Queen and say the god bit anyways.
For many, many years there has been an affirmation you can say, which excludes the religious references.
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Azog 150
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#86
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(Original post by Vodkaslur)
I still think it's a brilliant idea as Britain needs patriotism .. I guess too many foreigners and ASBOS and other rebels would refuse thoughhhh

There are plenty of patriotic Brits. The difference between us and the US is we are not into this whole in your face attitude. If you have ever driven through a small American town you will see American flags on every house etc. Add that to kids having to swear an oath and its all a bit much.

Its just not the British way to do all that. You can still be patriotic without flying a flag and saying 'I love my country' all the time.

I like seeing the occasional Union Jack, but if it was like America and they were absolutly every where I would soon be sick of it.

Basically, British patriotism is a lot more low-key, but it doesn't mean its not there.
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Aj12
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#87
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#87
That oath is so ironic, was it the same before the civil rights movement?
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Vodkaslur
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#88
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#88
(Original post by Azog 150)
There are plenty of patriotic Brits. The difference between us and the US is we are not into this whole in your face attitude. If you have ever driven through a small American town you will see American flags on every house etc. Add that to kids having to swear an oath and its all a bit much.

Its just not the British way to do all that. You can still be patriotic without flying a flag and saying 'I love my country' all the time.

I like seeing the occasional Union Jack, but if it was like America and they were absolutly every where I would soon be sick of it.

Basically, British patriotism is a lot more low-key, but it doesn't mean its not there.

:yep: :yep:
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Cesare Borgia
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#89
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#89
No, it goes without saying, rather be quiet and dignified in it than have your artificial, manufactured patriotism.
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WharfedaleTiger
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#90
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(Original post by Vodkaslur)
Nothing about your quote but as a prospective Nottingam student myself and Conservative supporter .. your sig really saddens me
What, that we exist? Don't worry-their are far more Tories than Labourites at the uni and they're generally not bad guys. Obviously I don't agree with them on many issues but they're okay lads. generally I find that people who have interest in politics are fairly similar, no matter which side of the ideological spectrum they lie.

That said, if you fancy a change and want to join the right side then we'll be right next to them at Freshers Fair...
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WharfedaleTiger
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#91
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#91
(Original post by Azog 150)
There are plenty of patriotic Brits. The difference between us and the US is we are not into this whole in your face attitude. If you have ever driven through a small American town you will see American flags on every house etc. Add that to kids having to swear an oath and its all a bit much.

Its just not the British way to do all that. You can still be patriotic without flying a flag and saying 'I love my country' all the time.

I like seeing the occasional Union Jack, but if it was like America and they were absolutly every where I would soon be sick of it.

Basically, British patriotism is a lot more low-key, but it doesn't mean its not there.
Yep, this post is spot on. I generally think that the British are quietly patriotic rather than the American style patriotism...
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TheSownRose
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#92
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#92
Not in the same situation. It is exists, but the only cases I've heard it being used are a friend who gained citizenship and MPs swearing allegiance to the queen.

I'd also like to point out that you don't have to do it. You have to be respectful to those who want to do it (ie, you can't slouch in your chair with music on your MP3 player whilst other people are doing the pledge) ... but you can refuse to say it yourself.
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Renner
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#93
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(Original post by jumpingjesusholycow)
I don't have to make any such oath if I don't want to and I would never make any such oath. It's nothing but a nationalistic chant and my saying it or not doesn't make any more resonsible than otherwise having not said it. I have NO allegiance to a strip of land anyway and you'd have to slit my throat before getting me to chant your ****.
Your attitude is quite disturbing, how can you feel no connection to the country which btw is more than just a strip of land, at least the UK is. You only have the rights you have because the state allows it, and with rights come responsibilities and one of those responsibilities is to do ones duty which in its most basic sense means just not breaking the law. Are you not happy to live in a country which grants you these rights, would you be happy for a foreign power to come in and remove said rights? When you can say in all honesty you wouldn’t mind if a foreign power took control of Britain then I will accept you really have no allegiance to the UK

I also take it you would rather ‘die’ than get into the fairly common situation where you have to swear allegiance in the UK, if it’s something you care so strongly about?
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kamc
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#94
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#94
(Original post by Bekaboo)
I like the idea of a school having a principles office where people have to go when they disagree with something on principle (as opposed to a principal's office)... it seems rather appropriate for refusing to pledge.
I wish I could say the typo was intended :facepalm2:
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Drewski
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#95
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#95
(Original post by badkarma989)
Yes, we ARE pledging allegiance to the flag itself. And what it stands for.
What's with all these numpties bumping ancient threads today?
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