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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    I find this very interesting. Let me ask you, what would you make of the decision of someone to reject a uni like LSE in favour of an ex-poly?
    Yeah I know you rejected a Maths course of some sort at LSE for Optometry at Anglia Ruskin...

    Let's put it this way, if you're happy about it, that's fine by me. It's your life after all. *However*, if you find yourself unemployed (which I do not wish upon you), then that's your fault and you should accept the consequences.

    If you find yourself happy and in a job paying tax, good on you.

    I would also say that I would never have the balls to do what you did, so you know in a way you command my respect.

    I ultimately respect your decision, and although it's something I wouldn't do, it's only because I would be happier at an academic university and not an ex-poly (hence my supposed elitist views).
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    True.

    Although the arts subjects arent being criticised- non traditional subjects/mickey mouse subjects/soft subjects or whatever you want to call them are whats being criticised- film studies being the target originally.

    You said 'you still need people to do the arts subjects otherwise there'll be a shortage...'

    yeah, true for arts subjects, but not true for soft subjects (do we need people to do soft subjects to avoid a shortage in those lines of work???).


    But yeah, your right, some people or many people on tsr give the impression everyone should study maths /physics etc which is wrong
    there are degrees for a reason and no matter if they are soft subjects or not, graduates are still needed to fill the jobs.
    you see people doing law degrees who can't get a job because there are not enough on offer, so if everyone did academic subjects like law and maths, it will become extremly competitive and there simply will not be nowhere near enough positions for everyone, the majority will end up wasting their time and money if this happened.

    but no people shouldnt be made to do soft subject just because there are more jobs on offer, but if they want to do it, then they should be allowed to do so without ridicule
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    (Original post by Sex Panther)
    Your sentiment is right, and your motivation is admirable: more people should do degrees because of a love for the subject. However, the attitude is a touch naive.

    Someone just quoted Labour's aim of 50% of school leavers entering Uni. The simple fact is, we're discovering very quickly that the job market just can't support the huge numbers of very qualified graduates the system is producing - and something has to give. In a disproportionate amount of cases it's the film and media graduates that are struggling the most. The issue is, huge numbers of people want to work within media, so the media graduates are competing against the very best people with 'more serious' arts degrees from top universities with work experience and, probably, friends/family within the industry, as well as people in the same position as them. And when they can't get a foot in the door, they're competing against people with strong analytical arts and science degrees for more generic roles, and employers just won't look at them.

    There are the general '2:2 and above' graduate schemes that they'll be qualified to enter, but unless these schemes are entirely CV-blind - which very few are - I'm not convinced they'll get looked at here either. I'm interviewing next week for a position as a recruitment manager with a small consultancy firm, and having read up on what they require for their consultant positions, they state 'an analytical degree in a serious discipline.' Now, if I get the job, I'm sorry to say that if I have two CVs in front of me, and one is a 2:2 in maths and the other a first in film, it's much more likely the film CV is going to end up in the 'No' pile....
    Naive, delusional, hopeful. You're certainly not the first to have called me that; I campaigned for Labour during the election :sigh:

    He knows full well he's less likely to get a job than a maths student. But if he has no interest in anything other than media, why study it for the sake of money? Better a degree that you can actually study than one you can't and wasting over £20000 on something you can't stick. And certainly better a media degree from John Moores or wherever than no degree.
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    (Original post by Wozzie)
    As the opposite of academic is vocational we would train our doctors, engineers, chemists, biologists, physicists where exactly?
    At the proper universities.

    Please don't tell me that Engineering and Medicine are vocational degrees, because, yeah, they have some vocational elements in it, but they command high academic requirements.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    My friend said basically that because I am starting a film and television studies course in september that i shouldn't even be going to uni becose its not a proper degree.

    She thinks she is better becose she is doing a maths degree. well i don't agree with this because film studies is a demanding degree and there is lots of demand for this degree. Anyway just needed to vent becose i worked so hard to get into this cource, people need to get real and realise that any degree is worth the same is each other.
    film studies is a very demanding subject, and the film industry is a potentially very lucrative industry

    if i chose to take a degree it would have been film or media

    maths is a very difficult subject, yes, but i dont quite think your buddy understands just how demanding a subject film studies is

    shes naive, thats what she is, naive

    don't know why you're vexing about her comments though, you're going to have alot more fun studying films and the industry than she does learning equations
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    At the proper universities.

    Please don't tell me that Engineering and Medicine are vocational degrees, because, yeah, they have some vocational elements in it, but they command high academic requirements.
    lol, a 14 year old up at gone 3:30 in the morning :toofunny:

    yes, a "14 year old girl" :rolleyes: I'm betting you're something like a 40 year old man.
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    At the proper universities.

    Please don't tell me that Engineering and Medicine are vocational degrees, because, yeah, they have some vocational elements in it, but they command high academic requirements.
    I'm not sure if you're trying to troll or not, but you do realise many of the universities you consider "below you" do in fact offer medicine as a course as well?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    if you find yourself unemployed (which I do not wish upon you)
    Absolute rubbish. Unemployed? I bet you thought he deserved to die.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    My friend said basically that because I am starting a film and television studies course in september that i shouldn't even be going to uni becose its not a proper degree.

    She thinks she is better becose she is doing a maths degree. well i don't agree with this because film studies is a demanding degree and there is lots of demand for this degree. Anyway just needed to vent becose i worked so hard to get into this cource, people need to get real and realise that any degree is worth the same is each other.
    Yes, a law or Doctors degree from oxbridge is worth the same as a 'surfing management' course from Brighton (no offence to Brighton people, im refering more to the course itself)
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    (Original post by ap3456)
    Indeed. The sad thing is that apart from the OP (obviously a troll) there are actually many people who are led to believe that a degree in media is equivalent to one in a serious subject.
    whether someone works in a laboratory, a bank or a recording studio, they're being paid what they're worth to their company or client

    media is not an 'unimportant' subject as there are a lot of jobs in media and a lot of money to be made in the related industries, it's a serious business
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    At the proper universities.

    Please don't tell me that Engineering and Medicine are vocational degrees, because, yeah, they have some vocational elements in it, but they command high academic requirements.
    A degree can be vocational and be academically challenging you know; medicine, law, engineering, architecture etc; all vocational, all highly academic.

    I'm just interested to know what your opinions are on Bsc Marine Biology at the University of Plymouth. I guess you don't know much about marine biology as it's quite specialised but would you say it's a hard science degree or a soft degree?
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    The truth is, those sort of courses are just enjoyable but mean crap all, broadcasters or TV shows don't give a **** about if you have a degree in media. I'm sorry sweet heart but your friend is correct about this. Listen to her and get a degree that is useful, not something that wont get you a job and you will be in debt big time paying for this.
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    Unfortunately for you, your friend is correct.
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    (Original post by TK2 King Pin)
    media is not an 'unimportant' subject as there are a lot of jobs in media and a lot of money to be made in the related industries, it's a serious business
    That's not in question; what is, is whether a media degree is going to help you get those jobs, and the answer is, not really: read my above post and I'll try to dig up some figures.
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    OP just commited TSR suicide.

    In the following order:

    1) Title did not have significant capital letter.
    2) Poor grammar and spelling. Shudder.
    3) 'Degree' :facepalm2: and lack of common sense. Some of us have spent years, years preparing ourselves and performing detailed research on degrees and future academics! When you come swanning in with no knowledge on the matter it's pure disrespectful and some would say insulting.
    4) You generally suck.

    Do not return to this site on the same account. You will be hacked and terrible things will happen to your family.

    You have been warned :holmes:
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    At the proper universities.

    Please don't tell me that Engineering and Medicine are vocational degrees, because, yeah, they have some vocational elements in it, but they command high academic requirements.
    I swear you get more ridiculous by the day.

    Medicine is regarded as a vocational degree. Indeed, it's quite academic as far as vocations go, however vocational doesn't mean not academically challenging. It is vocational, as it is leading to a specific career, and training you specifically FOR that career in a working environment. 3 years, out of 5 or 6 years depending on whether you intercalate, are working IN a hospital and are purely career training, whereas the other 2/3 years are scientific (unless in the latter number of years you intercalate with a clinical subject in which case it is more vocation than science).
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    (Original post by Sex Panther)
    That's not in question; what is, is whether a media degree is going to help you get those jobs, and the answer is, not really: read my above post and I'll try to dig up some figures.
    well to be fair, i'm not taking a degree and im going into media later this year

    what i imagine the course does provide, other than an understanding of how the industry works (depending on the university) is useful contacts and inside information

    what i have found however, having just finished a level, is that you can learn about it by yourself, and i think i'll be better equipped 3 years from now than someone fresh out of a media degree (with 3 years of working in a studio under my belt), so in that respect i guess you're right

    quote me if you get those figures btw
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    (Original post by lovely_me)
    OP just commited TSR suicide.

    In the following order:

    1) Title did not have significant capital letter.
    2) Poor grammar and spelling. Shudder.
    3) 'Degree' :facepalm2: and lack of common sense. Some of us have spent years, years preparing ourselves and performing detailed research on degrees and future academics ! When you come swanning in with no knowledge on the matter it's pure disrespectful and some would say insulting.
    4) You generally suck.

    Do not return to this site on the same account. You will be hacked and terrible things will happen to your family.

    You have been warned :holmes:
    what a hypocrite

    and i'd hardly call that tsr suicide, nor the 2nd or 4th points, or even the 3rd if im honest (although it bears a stronger argument than the other 3 points)
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    Do what you like, don't let anyone else tell you different!
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    (Original post by amiejade-x)
    not everyone has to or wants to do maths, physics, law etc
    Whoever said they did?

    (Original post by amiejade-x)
    if someone wants to better their life by going to uni and experiencing the uni life, then let them
    Who's to say it will 'better their life' exactly?
    Uni degrees still get subsidized by the taxpayers pocket so I hardly think just because someone wants to 'experience uni life' with a useless degree is a good way to spend public money.

    (Original post by amiejade-x)
    people still get first class degrees from all unis, yeah maybe not as many, but just because you don't go to oxbridge doesn't necessarily mean that you don't have a chance to suceed in whatever course you are doing.
    Again, who said it doesn't?
    Irrelevant point here.

    (Original post by amiejade-x)
    you still need people to do the arts subjects otherwise there will be a shortage of graduates in this field of work and if people prefer arts subjects, then let them do it!
    Yes, we still need people for the art industries but is qualification by degree appropriate? I think not.
    Frankly, 'art degrees' like media/fashion/etc are overcrowded and are quickly being deemed useless. This isn't being snobby - this is a fact.

    Has on anyone else picked up that all the people harping on about 'equal degrees' have significantly poorer arguments and worse grammar than those who don't?
    I think I see a correlation - I wonder why :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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