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Speech from a 15 y/o on fees to an audience of 1000+ Watch

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    (Original post by Fat-Love)
    I may not agree with the content but I applaud his passion and proactive approach to his education. It's not often you get 15 year olds concerned with matters such as this but if it happened more often it can only be a good thing.
    He is pretentious and it's his age that is the hard sell.
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    (Original post by Manitude)
    Looking at it as an example of "a speech" it's pretty good, especially for his age. He's clearly spent quite some time watching how excellent public speakers make their speeches (I would say he may have taken note from one of the one best public speakers of all time, Hitler, but I really doubt that given that it was a student giving the speech)

    I disagree with much of what he said content-wise though.
    No amount of student protests will change the minds of politicians, violent or otherwise. You can make your view known, but don't expect to change minds. They knew the rise in fees would be extremely unpopular - they already know that, and they've made their decision with that knowledge in mind. They have decided that, on balance, it is worth saving the money but having to face thousands of angry students. Politicians are not out to get students and deliberately annoy them or treat them unfairly, they simply saw a large amount of expenditure and reduced it.
    behave - they want whats best for them and the markets. The expenditure isnt a problem when you realise if we collect our tax gap we'd have an extra 40-120 billion.

    Student protests can change minds. Look at France 1968. They caused a massive wave of protests. They very nearly brought the government down. The only reason they didnt was because they let the De Gaulle back for an election rather than keeping up the pressure - if they hadnt of done that then you were not far off looking at a revolutionary situation. So more than a change of minds you were looking at a change of system.

    In Britian the Poll Tax was defeated by mass non payment campaign of 18million people. Politicians will change their minds if they are forced to by a big enough threat from 'the masses'. This is obvious.

    Your right on ur first parts that they already decided to go for it, but i think your wrong a)they wernt expecting this level of protest b) it can make a difference, in fact it has as wales and scotland will be subsiding the fee increase and to keep EMA now. Further, how many lib dem MPs would have voted against the bill had it not been for this level of protest?
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    (Original post by badtothebone)
    behave - they want whats best for them and the markets. The expenditure isnt a problem when you realise if we collect our tax gap we'd have an extra 40-120 billion.

    Student protests can change minds. Look at France 1968. They caused a massive wave of protests. They very nearly brought the government down. The only reason they didnt was because they let the De Gaulle back for an election rather than keeping up the pressure - if they hadnt of done that then you were not far off looking at a revolutionary situation. So more than a change of minds you were looking at a change of system.

    In Britian the Poll Tax was defeated by mass non payment campaign of 18million people. Politicians will change their minds if they are forced to by a big enough threat from 'the masses'. This is obvious.

    Your right on ur first parts that they already decided to go for it, but i think your wrong a)they wernt expecting this level of protest b) it can make a difference, in fact it has as wales and scotland will be subsiding the fee increase and to keep EMA now. Further, how many lib dem MPs would have voted against the bill had it not been for this level of protest?
    If it was that easy, why havent the government already done it?
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    (Original post by jakemittle)
    If it was that easy, why havent the government already done it?
    no political will to do it.

    billionaire Sir Phillip Green, head of Arcadia (topshop etc.), is advising the governement on how to implement the cuts. Green's wife lives in Monaco for tax purposes. So this fella isn't exactly going to want to crack down on tax dodgers. The government appoint him for a number of reasons, but i think primarily as they are of the same ilk, being in government isnt a job for life - they'll need to do summit after - say sit on the board of a big business, and their chances of this are increased if they help them when in government. In effect the politicians and big business men help each other out and this means it is at the expense of our public services, jobs, pensions etc.

    that is pretty much the reason. Politicians don't really represent whats best for you, the represent whats best for them, which usually isnt good for you. The way to change that is to kick up a fuss to such an extent that its better for them to do what the working/middle class want than for what the business class want. That usually means a mass campaign with marches, strikes, occupations etc.

    Unfortunate, but true.
 
 
 
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