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I am poor and want to do a 2nd degree...how to fund this? Watch

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    (Original post by Larrabee)
    So people like winter mute who want to do second degrees in medicine. they're wastrels are they? Those doctors, they don't contribute to society at all!

    Did you know that a high proportion of nurses and other health professionals have first degrees in unrelated subjects?

    I can see where doing degree after degree until you're 60 and never actually getting a job might be a bit of an issue, but realistically how many people would actually do this? Most people who do second degrees do so in order to get into a specific career or to better their career prospects, leading to them being more productive, not less.
    Don't be ridiculous. Anyone wanting to do any of those degrees you mention get funding already. Quite rightly. We need them. It is the whiners who "didn't realise History wouldn't get me a job " that don't deserve any sympathy.
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    there is nothing much you can do. Other than get a bank loan or stick with it unfortunately
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    Don't be ridiculous. Anyone wanting to do any of those degrees you mention get funding already. Quite rightly. We need them. It is the whiners who "didn't realise History wouldn't get me a job " that don't deserve any sympathy.
    Not all medical degrees are funded at all, none are fully funded, only part.

    Nursing has the fees paid right now, do you think that will continue under this government?

    There are plenty of degrees outside the healthcare field that are very useful to society, you mention history, well I happen to think history is important to humanity in general, don't you?

    You do realise that same 'whiner' who has become disillusioned with history might be one of the students who goes pn to be an excellent doctor or nurse? So do they deserve funding or not?
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    are you thick or something? They get it funded!
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    Actually, on balance, NO. We are already producing more medics than we need and can get them trained from Europe, much cheaper. I'd much rather have a French doc then a UK one. There's is the best health care system in the world and their doctors the worst paid in Europe, so they'd jump at the chance to come here.
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    are you thick or something? They get it funded!
    My point was, you state that 'whiners who did history' don't deserve funding, but people doing medicine as a second degree do, without realising that they could be the exact same people.

    No I'm not thick thanks for asking, your first sentence should start with a capital A though.
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    OP- just wanted to add something, having read through the thread a bit more (does anyone else just read one or two pages of a big thread and skip to the end?).

    Maths and Biology are definitely not incompatible. Though would be far easier to research in biology having studied maths first, than the other way round!

    History is peppered with folk who studied an alternative subject first, before doing some important biological research- Frances Crick did Physics- and it's still happening now. This is because there are areas of biological research which are indeed based on mathematical methods. I've met mathematics Phds who were researching population dynamics of infectious diseases (epidemiology, really) and trying to predict whether things like bird flu were going to become a pandemics, and what to do to contain it. I also know of one engineering Phd who is studying the mechanics of certain human muscles. Ha, just remembered- the neuroscientist Susan Greenfield (love her or loathe her) studied Classics first, before going onto graduate studies in Neurophysiology (I guess the Ox system was a lot different back then!!).

    There are also mathematicians working in the fields of evolution and genome selection, the mechanics of animal locomotion, the spread of a gene in a population, and good old statistics (Bleurgh. Memories of a bad lecturer...).

    If you studied biology and wanted to do mathematical research, that'd be much, much harder! Erm I suppose if you studied animal behaviour, you would stray into economics and mathematical probabilities... Maths tends to slip into biology one way or another though, so you could find ways to encounter it. Harder to do it without learning all the equations and legwork first- I did Biochem and I feel like I have an understanding of lots of biochem science, but I don't have the set of 'tools' and ability to carry out equations that a mathematician would have.

    Hope that's of some inspiration to you. I got depressed at uni too. It was all-consuming and in the end I just kept my head down and completed my three years because I wanted to get it over with, and get free in the world I've done some study since then, stuff which I wanted to do, and it was great as I knew myself a lot better, and I could pay for it myself. Wish the government would approve student loans to folk who want a second degree for a good reason... I have a flipping strong drive to work and pay off my debts, so it's not like I'm going to sit on my butt and be unemployed afterwards.
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    That's why I'm glad the govt only funds degrees once. People take the piss, how someone can choose a degree that's not right for them is beyond me.

    If you are really motivated then you will work and save up for a masters or whatever you plan to do. There are also bank career development loans available.

    Maybe it's time for the workplace and to gain a bit of maturity. It's no longer the nanny state and rightfully so.
    That's a rather unintelligent thing to say. Most people usually go to uni at around age 18 which is very young. At such a young age, with little wisdom experience or knowledge it's not surprising that a lot of people don't know what they want to do.

    Also for some people they've known what they wanted to do since they were about 15 or even since a little child, however this is rare. Also there are people that are only good at one thing and have a clear career path because there are no other options.

    Some people find it hard to find their calling or passion because they are equally good at everything and have an equal interest in everything.

    Sometimes with very difficult courses, often scientific, what you think the course is going to be like is very different to how it actually is. Some courses there's no way you can know what it's like before you get there, all you can have is preconceptions. People do History at a level and then History at uni, Psychology or English lit at a level then the same thing at uni, something like Geophysics is very different.

    I find it odd you are unable to understand how someone can choose the wrong subject.
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    I disagree, I studied biomed because I genuinely enjoyed it and wanted to work in the field, however as I got more involved in the course I decided that I wanted to study medicine and work in the public sector.

    There are numerous reasons why people decide to do a degree in a particular field, be it money, peer/family pressure or because they have a particular affinity for that subject.

    Choosing a degree at 18 can be a mentally tiring process and whilst at Uni many, many people I knew had no idea what they wanted to do in life. Some did Masters to try and focus their interest in something specific, some abandoned their original courses altogether for other things and others have just enjoyed life for a bit.

    OP you can receive (maintenance)loans as far as I am aware however you will not be eligible for the tuition fee loan. You can apply for a bank loan which can tide you over for a little while but you will need to find paid work.

    I am going down the same route this year and its not going to be easy. Just make sure you genuinely want to do this and that it will benefit you in the long run.

    Totally agree. There are many reasons. Can't see how Babygirl110 could find it impossible to comprehend how someone could choose the wrong degree.

    Clearly she hasn't spoken to many older adults.

    Countless people I've spoken to that are aged 25-50 are working in a completely different field to what they got degrees in. It's not such a weird thing.
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    (Original post by mackemforever)
    Live with it.

    You didn't do your research properly and so you chose the wrong course. Surely you would have realised that you were not a fan of the course within the first year, at which point you could have changed to something you liked more, or dropped out and reapplied.

    Also, you must have known before you went travelling that you wanted to do a 2nd degree, so why didn't you stay at home rather than travelling so you had some money to start your 2nd degree.

    As thing stand you have 1 option, get a job, save up, and then apply again a few years down the line.
    I did a LOT of research when choosing my course. Far more research than anyone that did choose the right course. Your judgement and attitude is poor.
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    This suggests to me that people going to university are obviously a bit immature to be making important decisions such as choosing the right university degree and possibly need to take time out in the workplace before making such huge decisions. I'm glad the coalition government is putting an end to this nanny state otherwise how will people effectively make career decisions if they are handed things on a plate? I'm glad EMA has been scrapped (I hope whatever they have replaced it with is most appropriate). I'm also glad people like the OP will be unable to get a maintenance grant for their second degree. I'm also glad tuition fees has been raised because that way people will start seriously considering the decisions they make when they go to university and it will also bring back value to university education.

    I accept that we all make career shifts and changes but then we need to take full responsibility for that. Why can't the OP accept responsibility for his mistake and self-fund a Masters in Maths? That's because he is used to the nanny state that hands everything on a plate and so he wants to know if they can pay for another degree for him, that's absolutely absurd. If it means taking a few years to work then to do that. If he wants it so much then he will commit to doing so.

    I know someone who wanted to do medicine but didn't manage to achieve the grades she needed and so chose to do biomed with the view to go into medicine from then. There was a clear career focus and she also committed to self funding her career therefore, I don't quite liken your situation to the OP's. The OP expects to receive funding for his education, it's not quite the same because he's not taking responsibility.
    The OP came here not to receive judgement but for advice. People like you giving negative comments are of no use to them.
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    You wanna make some quick money? I can give you a few packages and all you gotta do is sell them on and you can make quick dosh, let me know if you're interested. (It's Ice Cream by the way )
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    (Original post by blue_shift86)
    But what if i want to do a maths degree? I think it'll be hard to do maths masters without having a sufficient grounding at bachelors level. I mean I did a few applied maths modules in my geophysics degree, but no where near the amount i would need for masters i think.
    If you can do a Masters of a subject without doing a degree I think it must be PRETTY easy. It's silly for them to suggest you can do a Maths masters without much other Maths knowledge when maths is a real subject.
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    (Original post by Blue Rose)
    That's a rather unintelligent thing to say. Most people usually go to uni at around age 18 which is very young. At such a young age, with little wisdom experience or knowledge it's not surprising that a lot of people don't know what they want to do.

    Also for some people they've known what they wanted to do since they were about 15 or even since a little child, however this is rare. Also there are people that are only good at one thing and have a clear career path because there are no other options.

    Some people find it hard to find their calling or passion because they are equally good at everything and have an equal interest in everything.

    Sometimes with very difficult courses, often scientific, what you think the course is going to be like is very different to how it actually is. Some courses there's no way you can know what it's like before you get there, all you can have is preconceptions. People do History at a level and then History at uni, Psychology or English lit at a level then the same thing at uni, something like Geophysics is very different.

    I find it odd you are unable to understand how someone can choose the wrong subject.
    No hunny, I think an individual choosing to waste three or four years of his or her life is the most unintelligent thing to do. That is a waste of money and years. I'm so glad the majority vote was in favour of the raise in tuition fees, people might think twice before deciding that university is their natural career progression route. I'm also glad that once people have used up whatever allowances and loans they get from the government for their first degree, they are then not entitled to further funding. I've come across many individuals who have come unstuck post graduation, they made their beds and they should lie in them.

    If people are too young to make the decision at 18 then that suggests to me that the system is failing young people. Yes there are people who have a clear plan of what they want to do and where they expect their career path to take them, if university is what they need to get to their chosen destination then by all means. If people are unsure how and where their university course will take them then they probably need to make that decision when they are more mature. There are loads of options available to them, they do not need to immediately go to university at 18. Young people have been made to believe that university is the way to go after A levels. Yes, that is the case for some but not all, some people are more suited to apprenticeships and various other options.

    The fact is a large number of unemployed graduates have come out of university with degrees that aren't even worth the paper they are written on. They and the previous government would like to blame the recession but is the economic downturn the reason employers don't value some of these degrees? Somehow I don't think so. There are loads of good graduate jobs out there but there just isn't sufficient skill in the graduate market, only a select few graduates are actually suitable.

    A decision to do a university degree costs loads of money, time and years that is why I am unable to understand how someone can be so erroneous in making such a huge decision. I also think it's extremely unintelligent to suggest someone is unintelligent for airing a personal view without even questioning why that person has that view.
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    (Original post by Blue Rose)
    I did a LOT of research when choosing my course. Far more research than anyone that did choose the right course. Your judgement and attitude is poor.
    The only reason you find his judgement and attitude poor is because he is being pragmatic and you find it difficult to take in.
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    (Original post by I<3LAMP)
    Oh dear, ok I may need to prostitute myself,

    Any takers? :sigh:
    Where do live? :sexface: Today, I'm feeling generous...
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    For me, studying my degree is what led to my academic development which subsequently fed my disatisfaction for the subject. Hence I am choosing to do a second degree.

    I would never have realised this had I not studied my first degree.

    It isn't as simple as 'doing the research'.
    :fatcontroller::fatcontroller::gthumb::groovy::goodnight:
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    Hey,

    Where do you live in the united kingdom? If you live in england, then I think that you are not entitled to a maintainence loan for your second degree.

    However, if you live in Scotland, then you are allowed a student loan for living costs, which is a maximum of 5000 pounds, depending on your parental income. Also, the tuition fees if you choose to study a second degree in scotland would only be around 1200 pounds.

    It says this on saas ( the student awards agency for scotland):-

    Question:- I want to do a second degree. Will I be eligible to receive support from public funds again?

    Answer:- We will not pay all of your fees, the bursary or the additional loan if you have already received support for your first degree. If you have had a break in study of a
    year or more you can apply to us to pay £520 (£1,570 for medicine) towards your fees. You can apply for a student loan for living-costs and supplementary grants.
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    No hunny, I think an individual choosing to waste three or four years of his or her life is the most unintelligent thing to do.
    You are like a miniture of Alan Sugar aren't you? Vile creature. Jog along now you arrogant toddler. The world needs fewer people like you. You have nothing to add to my post and are just here insulting far more intelligent people than you. Research shows that indecisive people are just that because they are smart - they can do anything they put their mind to. You must not fit into this category because obviously you were born knowing you wanted to be a little alan sugar didn't you?....you waste cadet...
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    No hunny, I think an individual choosing to waste three or four years of his or her life is the most unintelligent thing to do.
    I think addressing people as 'hunny' in order to be patronising is up there on the list.
 
 
 
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