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Are ethnic minorities who use anglicised names sell outs? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Are these people sell outs?
    Yes
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    17.09%
    No
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    67.52%
    In some cases
    18
    15.38%

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    (Original post by BoxesAndBangles)
    :

    He does haha. And when he absolutely HAS to admit his Arab side he pretends he's Lebanese.. cos in Arab countries sometimes Lebanese is considered to be the most 'exotic' and 'attractive' country. Lol the man is hilarious.
    im half italian (british) and lebanese but pretend (sometimes) to be latin

    Nothing wrong with that! Not sellling out!
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    (Original post by Stratos)
    My friend mohamed changed his name to Daniel.

    'I was like o.O'

    Spoiler:
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    wrong use of 'like' but as time passes it will morph the grammatical structure around it.
    suppose he still kept it "muslim" although prounouced as danial rather than the muslims way of daan-yaal.
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    (Original post by bunty64)
    im half italian (british) and lebanese but pretend (sometimes) to be latin

    Nothing wrong with that! Not sellling out!
    Haha, you've got the two sides this guy wishes he was! I don't know, people used to treat me differently in Arab countries and not like to speak Arabic with me that much thinking their horrible English was soo much more appropriate. When I pretended I was of Arabic heritage (I'm dark anyway) I got a much better response - but I stopped because I felt it WAS selling out, if they didn't accept me for who I was it hurt a lot because I loved the country and the language, which was why I was trying and why I went there - but I didn't really want to keep chasing something I wasn't accepted in anyway. I am who I am
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    Well, I am doing it. I'm German and have a northern German / Scandinavian name that most English speakers find quite hard to pronounce. That's why I go by an anglicised version of my second name. I've met some people who found it weird but I can't see what's wrong with it. It's just really annoying if you spend like 10 minutes just to spell your name every time you introduce yourself, especially at parties meeting random people you'll probably never see again.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    How on earth can it be a sellout? I'm sure they are perfectly aware of their original names prior to Anglicization.

    I think Anglicization is a great idea as it may often help in maximising their probability of employment.
    That is selling out. Selling out is when you change something about yourself or something that you have or do for success.
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    (Original post by Lyaios)
    Well, I am doing it. I'm German and have a northern German / Scandinavian name that most English speakers find quite hard to pronounce. That's why I go by an anglicised version of my second name. I've met some people who found it weird but I can't see what's wrong with it. It's just really annoying if you spend like 10 minutes just to spell your name every time you introduce yourself, especially at parties meeting random people you'll probably never see again.
    Exactly. I don't know why people find it difficult to understand why people do it when the reasons are obvious.
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    I don't have an English name but if people made an effort to try and pronounce our names some people would not choose an English name. My name gets missed in the register at school because of lazy teachers, it is not even that hard to say or they call me by my surname becuase it is English.
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    Exactly. I don't know why people find it difficult to understand why people do it when the reasons are obvious.
    Why change their name completely to an English name, why not simply shorten their name but it keep its form? It's common for people called Alexander or Christopher to shorten theirs but not change it completely to suit others. Also I've met a lot of Muslims/Arabs who have really long complicated names and Greek people as well, they don't use English names though - either people refer to them via a shortened version or they simply keep it intact. It doesn't seem to do them any harm.
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    I think there is a big difference between them actively choosing to do it, and feeling that they have to.
    And since no two people are the same, it wouldn't be wise to call them all "sell-outs" at the best of times.
    I understand what you are saying, but there is more to an ethnic or religious background than a name.
    Much, much more.
    If I get married in the future and take my husbands surname, am I selling out my family?
    Not in my book.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    Why change their name completely to an English name, why not simply shorten their name but it keep its form? It's common for people called Alexander or Christopher to shorten theirs but not change it completely to suit others. Also I've met a lot of Muslims/Arabs who have really long complicated names and Greek people as well, they don't use English names though - either people refer to them via a shortened version or they simply keep it intact. It doesn't seem to do them any harm.
    My name is shortened, I haven't changed it but then I can empathise with those people who decide to totally changed their names. When one deals with frustrations of having a long name, I can see how it could get to a point when they would want absolutely nothing to do with that name.

    Also people also seem to find it difficult to say even the shortest name, as Ayostunner described. When people go through such frustrations even with their shortened forms, maybe the best way is just to change the name?
    Saying that, I would prefer to have an ethnic name. The annoying thing about my name is that its long and unpronounceable. The shorted form ends up being an English name which I don't want. I would prefer just to have a short ethnic name.
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    (Original post by damidude)
    That is selling out. Selling out is when you change something about yourself or something that you have or do for success.
    When I lived in South Asia I wore a kurta/lungi.

    When I started work in the UK I wore a suit.

    Soon I will go to the Netherlands and since there is no dress code at the company I'm joining there I can wear a kurta again.

    Do you think it is selling out to wear a suit in the UK?

    What about a British-born person who wears a tracksuit at home but chooses to wear an ironed suit and ironed trousers in his/her workplace (in the UK). Is this selling out too? - since they are after all changing something about themselves, probably for the sake of success.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    When I lived in South Asia I wore a kurta/lungi.

    When I started work in the UK I wore a suit.

    Soon I will go to the Netherlands and since there is no dress code at the company I'm joining there I can wear a kurta again.

    Do you think it is selling out to wear a suit in the UK?

    What about a British-born person who wears a tracksuit at home but chooses to wear an ironed suit and ironed trousers in his/her workplace (in the UK). Is this selling out too? - since they are after all changing something about themselves, probably for the sake of success.
    No I'ts not selling out to wear a suit.

    Your example is different. Wearing a suit is different from changing your name for two reasons. Firstly, at your workplace, there will already be a dresscode set out for you to adhere to. And secondly changing your name is a bigger deal. Its a permanent change.
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    (Original post by Captain92)
    I think there is a big difference between them actively choosing to do it, and feeling that they have to.
    And since no two people are the same, it wouldn't be wise to call them all "sell-outs" at the best of times.
    I understand what you are saying, but there is more to an ethnic or religious background than a name.
    Much, much more.
    If I get married in the future and take my husbands surname, am I selling out my family?
    Not in my book.
    No because you'd be doing that for the reason that you stated, that you got married. If you lived with your boyfriend's family and changed your surname to "fit in" with them then that's selling out imo.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    When I lived in South Asia I wore a kurta/lungi.

    When I started work in the UK I wore a suit.

    Soon I will go to the Netherlands and since there is no dress code at the company I'm joining there I can wear a kurta again.

    Do you think it is selling out to wear a suit in the UK?

    What about a British-born person who wears a tracksuit at home but chooses to wear an ironed suit and ironed trousers in his/her workplace (in the UK). Is this selling out too? - since they are after all changing something about themselves, probably for the sake of success.
    People just don't seem to understand that it's a simple process of adaptation which is driven by a need for survival, it has an evolutionary basis.

    I'd rather be an adaptable than a non adaptable individual.

    I think people who aren't able to adapt are usually simple minded, my observation anyway. I'm sure there's loads of research demonstrating that adaptable individuals tend to be more successful.
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    (Original post by damidude)
    No I'ts not selling out to wear a suit.

    Your example is different. Wearing a suit is different from changing your name for two reasons. Firstly, at your workplace, there will already be a dresscode set out for you to adhere to. And secondly changing your name is a bigger deal. Its a permanent change.
    No. You can always change the name back through deed poll. Many people have official names which differ from the names their friends and family call them. My uncle has an official name which none of his close family call him - instead they call him by his pet name which is very different (not like Robert vs. Bob).

    Also, if I don't wear a kurta, but wear jeans and a jumper in public (but not in the workplace), does this class as "selling out" too? (since there is no 'dresscode' in public places)

    Do you think changing one's citizenship classes as 'selling out' too? So were I to change my English citizenship to Dutch citizenship would I be 'selling out'?
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    People just don't seem to understand that it's a simple process of adaptation which is driven by a need for survival, it has an evolutionary basis.

    I'd rather be an adaptable than a non adaptable individual.

    I think people who aren't able to adapt are usually simple minded, my observation anyway. I'm sure there's loads of research demonstrating that adaptable individuals tend to be more successful.
    Hence why it could be described as selling out. Changing your name from a foreign one to an English one is "adapting" but it is also discarding a part of your heritage in order to chase success (and money).
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    Hence why it could be described as selling out. Changing your name from a foreign one to an English one is "adapting" but it is also discarding a part of your heritage in order to chase success (and money).
    I'd rather do that, **** heritage. In fact, I'm already doing it in many ways, call me a sell-out or whatever you like. There are some traditional things in my culture that I would rather do with out.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    Hence why it could be described as selling out. Changing your name from a foreign one to an English one is "adapting" but it is also discarding a part of your heritage in order to chase success (and money).
    This was done by huge numbers of European immigrants to the United States in the early 20th century, as well as by many descendents of European Crusaders in the Middle East (though in the latter case changing from a Western European one to an Arab/Turkic one). There didn't appear to be very many complaints with the actions of these peoples.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    No. You can always change the name back through deed poll. Many people have official names which differ from the names their friends and family call them. My uncle has an official name which none of his close family call him - instead they call him by his pet name which is very different (not like Robert vs. Bob).

    Also, if I don't wear a kurta, but wear jeans and a jumper in public (but not in the workplace), does this class as "selling out" too? (since there is no 'dresscode' in public places)

    Do you think changing one's citizenship classes as 'selling out' too? So were I to change my English citizenship to Dutch citizenship would I be 'selling out'?
    It depends what your motivations are if its for success (like James Khan/Caan) then yeah that it. but if its just a nickname then thats different.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    This applies to anyone of immigrant background who has a foreign sounding name and purposely uses an anglicised form of their name or uses a completely different English name instead. Barack Obama did it for a while, used the name "Barry" which people in college knew him as rather than his birth name. It is much more common in the US as you'll see a lot of Oriental/Asian as well as Arabs people adopt English first names (that may be because Americans find pronouncing foreign names a bit tricky) but it is quite common among some groups in the UK. It isn't uncommon for people of Nigerian background to use English names officially but be referred to by their African name among their family. What does everyone think though, are they ashamed of their culture or is this simply an effort to fit in with the rest of us? Is this a good thing or a bad thing?
    Are they sell outs? No.

    Were you being a bit of an ass by starting this thread? Probably.
 
 
 
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