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    (Original post by ilovehotchocolate)
    Peninsula is the only medical school in the country which does not do dissection or prosection. Their theory is that if you are looking at dead flesh you have done something wrong as dead flesh looks very different to living tissues. We learn all our anatomy by drawing it and feeling the landmarks on each other and life models, using plastic models, looking at online resources like Aclands Dissection videos and Anatomy TV. They say that if a view of something doesn't exist that you want they will make it for you. Not only that, but you can prob download it to your iphones as well. They are quite techy, our lot. Personally, I love doing it this way because I can look at it in lots of different ways as many times as I like, and I can go through the anatomy dissection videos which are helpfully broken down into 5 minute chunks on specific parts with helpful commentary from many different angles, whenever I like as many times as I like. You can only cut something once, and I'm assuming you can only see the prosections once? If we really want to do some cutting ourselves, there's tales of a surgeon in Truro that will do small group sessions on demand.
    We can request sessions in the DR with prosections etc. pretty much as often as we like.

    And I can see their point at Peninsula, but even dead embalmed flesh is useful to look at and feel. Particularly when looking at the path of nerves or blood vessels. Plus, at a school operating with prosection/dissection, you get the benefit of those methods of learning, but can also utilise the methods you use at peninsula (we also do timetabled surface anatomy on each other etc.) in addition.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I used the term "non-medic" in the context of it being a medical open day. It's fine to use cadavers for education (as their are many other fields that do dissection and use prosections) but not to "show off" dissection as part of open days or to sell the course.
    I'm not sure they would have been show the exposed cadavers; when I went on the BSMS open day they let us into the dissection room and the cadavers were out on the dissecting tables but wrapped in plastic as they normally are.

    BSMS is also pretty strict on what comes in and out of the DR, and the HTA guidelines, so I would be very surprised if they had the cadavers themselves out (and unwrapped) on the open days.
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    (Original post by Persephone9)
    I'm not sure they would have been show the exposed cadavers; when I went on the BSMS open day they let us into the dissection room and the cadavers were out on the dissecting tables but wrapped in plastic as they normally are.

    BSMS is also pretty strict on what comes in and out of the DR, and the HTA guidelines, so I would be very surprised if they had the cadavers themselves out (and unwrapped) on the open days.
    I had a prosected lower limb waved in my face.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I had a prosected lower limb waved in my face.
    Well I have to say that's pretty gross. Actually though, I had forgotten they showed us prosections on the open day.
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    (Original post by digitalis)
    I had a prosected lower limb waved in my face.
    thats about normal for you Brats, mind. i understand one of your students left a prosected hand on the London tube one afternoon. it caused quite a scream! that poor lady passenger...
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    Do Glasgow do whole-body dissection, for how long and how often? (Does it play a big part?)
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    Do Liverpool do dissection on cadavers?
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    Manchester does, but the damn dentists nick the heads, so its everything from the neck down that you get to do

    (Original post by jimbob_)
    Do Liverpool do dissection on cadavers?
    I'm not 100% sure but I think they do from what I remember at interview there. They also had a new shiny anatomy department with loads of stuff in that looked pretty beasty.
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    (Original post by xy7690*)
    what are the pros of learning anatomy through dissection/prosection.
    Well you can't really learn it any other way Most if not all medical schools use cadaveric material to teach, some do whole body dissection but most think that prosection works better.

    One of the key learning objectives is for students to experience the range of normality so that they can identify abnormality. That requires you to look at a person's arm...what their vertebrae look like. Not just what the book, the ideal person looks like.
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    Keele & QUB
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    st andrews deos and there's only four people in my group, try to beat that ratio anywhere!
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Well you can't really learn it any other way
    Don't Peninsula use some kind of funky computers to learn anatomy, with no hands-on work at all?
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    if you mean using people for surface anatomy, using images that are used in hospitals every day or having access to prosections isnt hands on, then yes thats true.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Don't Peninsula use some kind of funky computers to learn anatomy, with no hands-on work at all?
    Possibly, certainly all the medical schools I know of use it in some respect

    Learn something new everyday.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Don't Peninsula use some kind of funky computers to learn anatomy, with no hands-on work at all?
    We've got computers (not funky ones... just standard computers!) that have anatomy software on them. You can get them from home as well...off the top of my head they're things like medical imaging programmes, videos of dissection and virtual people you can look around.

    We do get hand on experience though it's not dissection - things like living anatomy session where we draw on each other, learn to recognise landmarks and such. We've also got ****-loads of plastic anatomical models to gander at.

    Personally I find it a perfectly good way of learning anatomy, though as I've only been there for a term this could change. Also don't have any experience of dissection so couldn't say which is better!
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    (Original post by jimbob_)
    Do Liverpool do dissection on cadavers?
    We don't. We have the Human Anatomy Resource Centre (HARC) where an anatomist prepares all the prosections we use and we do get to handle them. Hope that helps.
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    they do do dissections on cadavers! they also have prosections aswell!
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Well you can't really learn it any other way Most if not all medical schools use cadaveric material to teach, some do whole body dissection but most think that prosection works better.

    One of the key learning objectives is for students to experience the range of normality so that they can identify abnormality. That requires you to look at a person's arm...what their vertebrae look like. Not just what the book, the ideal person looks like.
    i was thinking this is a poor philosophy, macca, since every cadaver to be dissected that ends up in your anatomy lab is ridden with abnormalities, being well old people, not ideal normal people.

    full body dissection teaches you to learn what is abnormal dead and way off colour, and torn apart by teenagers. although prosection improves on this latter point,i do like prosection.

    imaging is wat you will be looking at as a doctor, thats the only thing that will ever represent 'ideal' in the dissection lab.
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    (Original post by smile-always)
    We don't. We have the Human Anatomy Resource Centre (HARC) where an anatomist prepares all the prosections we use and we do get to handle them. Hope that helps.
    Yep, that defo helps! Thank you
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    as in on dead people?

    i know cardiff says it does, and it also says that it's "one of the few that does dissection"... so which other universities do dissection, and does this mean that a lot of universities don't do dissection of humans at all, or only a small amount and the rest is animals/looking at videos or whatever they do as a substitute?

    is it better to go to a uni that does this? because i think i learn better by doing stuff, rather than reading about other people doing stuff. also might help me get used to the idea of death.
 
 
 
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