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If you're of an ethnic minority, how do you react to someone saying this Watch

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    I usually just say that I was born in England, but my parents are from Nigeria. Though, more precisely, just my dad was born in Nigeria, as my mum was born in England and moved to Nigeria when she was a kid and pretty much grew up there.
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    (Original post by SpriteOrSevenUp)
    Half-caste?

    we are not half pure or anything of that sort.
    Half-caste (or often mis-spelt half-cast) is a term used to describe people of mixed race or ethnicity
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    What does "ethnic" mean to you? You do realise that calling someone "ethnic" is completely retarded as everyone has an ethnicity.
    ~Absolutely, but if i had said "brown" or "immigrant" or "black/chinese/asian/middle eastern/latino/polynesian" i'd get some tw*t (someone not dissimilar to yourself) having a go at me for not being pc. So i suggest you grow some testes.
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    (Original post by yousif92)
    ~Absolutely, but if i had said "brown" or "immigrant" or "black/chinese/asian/middle eastern/latino/polynesian" i'd get some tw*t (someone not dissimilar to yourself) having a go at me for not being pc. So i suggest you grow some testes.
    I'm just saying you should've said "ethnic minorities" not "ethnics". The way you wrote it suggested you meant it in a derogatory manner, as if "whites" (as you put it) are over and above racial identification. Not to mention you used the word inaccurately. Someone cannot be "ethnic", someone CAN however belong to an "ethnic group" or "ethnic minority" etc. So may I suggest that YOU grow some testes, and learn how to use English correctly.
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    (Original post by therealOG)
    I'm just saying you should've said "ethnic minorities" not "ethnics". The way you wrote it suggested you meant it in a derogatory manner, as if "whites" (as you put it) are over and above racial identification. Not to mention you used the word inaccurately. Someone cannot be "ethnic", someone CAN however belong to an "ethnic group" or "ethnic minority" etc. So may I suggest that YOU grow some testes, and learn how to use English correctly.
    Firstly, i myself am an "ethnic". I use that word on a day to day with other "ethnics" and we all seem to do fine. With regards to my ability to master the english language: I am freshie ya? i cant speek full english brother ha yes? you from where?


    Penis.
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    (Original post by yousif92)
    Firstly, i myself am an "ethnic". I use that word on a day to day with other "ethnics" and we all seem to do fine. With regards to my ability to master the english language: I am freshie ya? i cant speek full english brother ha yes? you from where?


    Penis.
    Aren't we all?
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    (Original post by Jacktri)
    Half-caste (or often mis-spelt half-cast) is a term used to describe people of mixed race or ethnicity
    Do your research. It is highly offensive.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    Aren't we all?
    Ffs. Im not making myself very clear. Its in inverted commas for a particular reason.
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    "I'm from england."

    I hate that question so so so much... my dad's parents were born in ghana, my dad was born here and lived here all his life, my mum is just english.

    I have no contact with my dads side of the family, I've never been to ghana, i don't speak ghanain, i don't even know any ghanains but somehow complete strangers expect me confess to secretly being from this completely foreign country that I know f all about.

    My friends grandmother is french but she is not expected to announce to everybody she meets that she is in fact french.

    What they're really asking is "why are you not white?". I don't see myself as being remotely ghanain, I'm english and proud of being english, I find it quite hurtful and upsetting that they assume I can't possibly be a part of my own country.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    Why don't you just ask them what their ethnicity or ethnic origin(s) are, rather than posing a vague question?
    To someone you just met, "What is your ethnicity?" seems a little detailed and racial for a first convo IMO
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    (Original post by yousif92)
    Firstly, i myself am an "ethnic". I use that word on a day to day with other "ethnics" and we all seem to do fine. With regards to my ability to master the english language: I am freshie ya? i cant speek full english brother ha yes? you from where?


    Penis.
    Wow, you are one simple chap aren't you? Didn't you read my replies? YOU CANNOT BE AN "ETHNIC". "ETHNIC" IS NOT A NOUN. And your pathetic attempt at humour is actually quite humourous. Kudos to you.
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    I'd tell em my background.
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    Well I think next time I ask something like this I need to be more careful in my wording.

    I think last time I asked "is it india you're from?" Granted that's not a brilliant thing to say, but we were both drunk and as it happens my hunch was right (That's how I remember it anyway)
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    (Original post by lukejoshjedi)
    As in someone not of ethnic minority, you've met, you're getting along and you start talking about personal things - your family, past schools, where you're from etc

    "So where are you from"

    You answer casually, seeing as you were born in the UK, nothing weird

    "No, but where are you from"

    You may think that's like straight from a comedy skit and it never actually happens but it does, anyway if you're asked that and you're from an ethnic minority, how do you / would you react?

    Anyone got real and funny experiences of a conversation like that they want to share?
    I don't actually bother asking, if someone wants to tell me then that's their choice and if I do ask I ask if their parents were born in the UK aswell and then they usually say "yeh, but my grandparents are from.." or "no they're from.."
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    I really dislike the way people are uptight about race and ethnicity. Appreciating diversity is a good thing, we don't all need to pretend we're cut from the same cloth, that would just be so bland.

    But what I find amusing is the reaction of people when I tell them I'm from Baghdad - usually a white person will just look sympathetic, but a Muzzie want to know if I'm shia or sunni to know whether to hate me or sympathise.
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    i'd start of with saying that i'm born in england. and that i'm half indian, half pakistani. then it sometimes leads to stupidity like "so you're half muslim, half sikh?" -which makes no sense whatsoever.
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    I get asked this question sometimes, but not a lot since there are A LOT of Chinese / Asian people in Canada where I live.

    Yet, I still get very annoyed when I get asked this question.

    No, I am not from China, I am from Canada. I was born & raised in Canada, I barely speak the Chinese language and I'm really not a fan of China as all.

    So, where am I from? Canada, all the way.
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    I was best friends with this girl at school for about 5 years.
    One day she suddenly comes out with, "So, when did you move here from India?"
    I was born here. To put it bluntly, i was aegutituqbIUGBEATGBQIBubib
    Slightly relevant, i guess. Slightly.
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    i'd kick in the door waving my '44.
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    (Original post by SpriteOrSevenUp)
    Do your research. It is highly offensive.
    I did some research nobody found it offensive myth busted.
 
 
 
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