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    (Original post by dontlookhere)
    Good for you. Remember though, for some people thats so far from reality its quite insulting to tell them what the "real world" is to you, seeing as you clearly have no idea what the word "real" means
    And for some people, it's very close to reality. Which is exactly why I say the "real world" is different for everyone.

    For a tribesman in Africa, the "real world" is having to go to hunt food every day. If he told you that you were unprepared for the "real world", since you didn't know how to hunt, would you agree with him?
    I would simply say that my world is different to his, and requires a different set of skills. Sure, I probably couldn't cope in his "real world". But he probably couldn't cope in mine either.

    What gives one person the right to call their lifestyle any more "real" than someone elses?
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    (Original post by Lintu93)
    Really? Where I live, we have the 11+ system, and in my opinion, it works. The statisics speak for themselves in that the grammar schools (which take those who pass the 11+) have very high pass rates at GCSE and A-level and althought the secondary schools don't, people who do well from them often move to the sixth forms at the grammar schools.

    Is this not better than the comprehensive system?
    I don't think so no. If you pass the 11+ and get into grammar school then it's all lovely, and I would expect them to have great GCSE and A levels. What if a child for whatever reason performed poorly in the 11+, and had to spend the next 5 years in a secondary school that he didn't belong in? The test is not a perfect system for dividing pupils. People get put into the wrong groups and this can really affect their future. I don't disagree with the 11+ because I think that it bad to split people by ability, I just think that 11 years old is too early to do it.
    Obviously comprehensive schools are not a perfect system either, and I would never dream of arguing that. As a higher ability pupil who would have got into a grammar school if they had them in my area, myself and pupils like me were largely ignored by teachers as they tried to pull everyone's grade up to a C. I believe I could have got better GCSE results if I had gone to a grammar school. From a entirely personal and selfish point of view I suppose I would like to have gone to a grammar school, but in a wider, national context I don't think they are the best system. I think that the comprehensive system is the lesser of the two evils.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    And for some people, it's very close to reality. Which is exactly why I say the "real world" is different for everyone.

    For a tribesman in Africa, the "real world" is having to go to hunt food every day. If he told you that you were unprepared for the "real world", since you didn't know how to hunt, would you agree with him?
    I would simply say that my world is different to his, and requires a different set of skills. Sure, I probably couldn't cope in his "real world". But he probably couldn't cope in mine either.

    What gives one person the right to call their lifestyle any more "real" than someone elses?
    Its easy to call you're lifestyle the "real world" when you havent got a clue what reality is, anyone in the world could cope with you're money filled lifestyle
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    I hate to say it, but if State schools were as good as Private schools, there would be no need for private schools.

    Equally, there are some brilliant state schools and some shocking private schools.
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    (Original post by TheGrandmaster)
    What if a child for whatever reason performed poorly in the 11+, and had to spend the next 5 years in a secondary school that he didn't belong in?
    There are procedures where you can appeal against the decision and sometimes the primary school headteachers can get involved, so it's not always the end of the world. Also, when I sat the 11+ we sat three different papers and they averaged the marks from the top two.

    (Original post by TheGrandmaster)
    I don't disagree with the 11+ because I think that it bad to split people by ability, I just think that 11 years old is too early to do it.
    So if 11 is too young to split people by ability, when should it be done? At the end of key stage 3? After GCSE? Not at all?

    Although yeah, the system isn't perfect at all and has plently of flaws. I'm probably biased towards defending it because it's benefited me.
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    I did my GCSE's at an average state school and came out with straight A*'s. I don't come from a priveleged background, I wasn't sneered at or ridiculed at the state school I attended, and I more or less loved every minute of my time there. Moved to a grammar school for my A-Levels and there is a stark contrast which really seems to lack reality, as noted by other posters. It is elitist and I don't like it and am looking to move back to a comprehensive after Christmas. (I only changed as my former state school didn't have a sixth form).

    I know that this thread discusses the merits and demerits of private schools and I've talked about grammar, but I've seen that people have digressed and chose to do so as well. It would be interesting to hear more peoples views on the pro's and con's of grammar schools. If you are academically gifted, is it really necessary to attend a grammar school?

    Jack
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    I go to a grammar school and I think it's absolutely right for me; other schools in my area, I don't think, would have suited me and I wouldn't be happy as I'm lucky in that I don't have to work *too* hard for decent grades, but knowing the non-grammar and non-private schools near me, that would not have gone down too well which is why a grammar school suits me. As it is, the school I'm at produces excellent results pretty much across the board.
    However, they spend far too much time trying to persuade me that I want to do a scientific career; I dropped all sciences and maths for a reason, **** off . That's where I think my school is weak, as it doesn't open our eyes to things that are outside the scientific arena, which is very prejudiced against arts and humanities.
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    (Original post by dontlookhere)
    Its easy to call you're lifestyle the "real world" when you havent got a clue what reality is
    So then tell me, what is "reality"? And what makes this lifestyle you call "reality" anymore "real" than a rich person's lifestyle?
    Everybody thinks their lifestyle is "reality"...

    anyone in the world could cope with you're money filled lifestyle
    What makes you think my lifestyle is "money-filled"? How do you know that anyone in the world could cope with it?
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    What makes you think my lifestyle is "money-filled"? How do you know that anyone in the world could cope with it?[/QUOTE]

    You have already said that you went to a fee paying school and errrr well, because its easy?
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    (Original post by Lintu93)
    So if 11 is too young to split people by ability, when should it be done? At the end of key stage 3? After GCSE? Not at all?
    I'd like to say at the end of Key Stage 3, but I'm not sure how that would work logistically in practice. After GCSEs would be OK as well, GCSEs are pretty easy so the higher ability pupils will generally still do well.
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    (Original post by TheGrandmaster)
    I'd like to say at the end of Key Stage 3, but I'm not sure how that would work logistically in practice. After GCSEs would be OK as well, GCSEs are pretty easy so the higher ability pupils will generally still do well.
    Yeah, I'd like to say at the end of KS3 too. It would make sense as people would have a better grasp of where their abilities lie. Although, for that to work the school system would need a massive overhaul... I think a system where there is some sort of 'middle' comprehensive school for years 7, 8 and 9 would be quite good. Students could then chose to (a) to continue at the comprehensive, (b) sit a test for admission to a more academic grammar school, or (c) enrol at a more vocational school which teaches the core GCSE's alonside some more BTEC-style vocational courses.

    Logistical nightmare!

    But after GCSE's? My problem with that is that not every secondary comprehensive school would teach the same range of subjects (the obvious one that springs to mind is latin - it's not the most popular of subject and doesn't have enough teachers to cover every single school). At least separating students before the GCSE stage places students who are more likely to study latin into schools that teach latin, and students who are more likely to study hospitality into schools that teach hospitality.

    And of course, there'd be the private schools alongside this system for those parents who could afford it. :rolleyes:
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    This is an utter load of rubbish! Some parents work hard for their children to attend private schools, for the reason the reason that the state 'comprehensive' system is terrible and does not encourage the stable development of children (rather it encourages backwardness and apathy).
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    (Original post by Georgey1993)
    This is an utter load of rubbish! Some parents work hard for their children to attend private schools, for the reason the reason that the state 'comprehensive' system is terrible and does not encourage the stable development of children (rather it encourages backwardness and apathy).
    Erm... really? :confused:

    I highly doubt that! Have you got any proof for this?
 
 
 
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