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    I have never spoken to someone, face to face, who has either successfully and smoothly installed linux first time or acquired a computer that both had linux and worked. Windows seems simpler somehow.
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    (Original post by Bobifier)
    I have never spoken to someone, face to face, who has either successfully and smoothly installed linux first time or acquired a computer that both had linux and worked. Windows seems simpler somehow.
    Because it doesn't work. Its just an OS without any user functionality - its basically windows without menus, toolbars, any working drivers or software support, 90% of the time you have to write a decent kernel to get stuff done and over 9000 neckbeards who complain that home users arn't using it when its so much better.

    The reason it runs smoother and "less bloated" is because theres feck all there. Its for script-kiddies who think looking for a script online to organize a directory into backwards alphabetical order means they are born hackerz.

    Yes i mad, and i dont know why.
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    (Original post by Gwalchgwyn)
    Because it doesn't work. Its just an OS without any user functionality - its basically windows without menus, toolbars, any working drivers or software support, 90% of the time you have to write a decent kernel to get stuff done and over 9000 neckbeards who complain that home users arn't using it when its so much better.

    The reason it runs smoother and "less bloated" is because theres feck all there. Its for script-kiddies who think looking for a script online to organize a directory into backwards alphabetical order means they are born hackerz.

    Yes i mad, and i dont know why.
    I think your judgement of linux is perhaps mildly extreme and also maybe a bit unfair. I also can't help but feel that your final statement is the kind of thing you get teenage girls saying, just before they tell everyone "LOL I R SO RNDOM LOL" when really they're just acting retarded. Believe me, that's not a way you want to look. Unless you're a 14 year old girl, in which case LOL UR SO RANDOM.
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    (Original post by Bobifier)
    I think your judgement of linux is perhaps mildly extreme and also maybe a bit unfair. I also can't help but feel that your final statement is the kind of thing you get teenage girls saying, just before they tell everyone "LOL I R SO RNDOM LOL" when really they're just acting retarded. Believe me, that's not a way you want to look. Unless you're a 14 year old girl, in which case LOL UR SO RANDOM.
    I can't help but feel that you know im mildly correct and so try to change the subject into a personal attack in an attempt gain superiority.
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    Linux is great. I don't understand your problem.
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    Im using windows 7 on my pc because its a gaming one,
    but on my laptop i use kubuntu purely because of its extremely good looks and functionality
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    (Original post by Bobifier)
    I have never spoken to someone, face to face, who has either successfully and smoothly installed linux first time or acquired a computer that both had linux and worked. Windows seems simpler somehow.
    You have now. Ubuntu is so easy to install, you can even do it straight from windows for those that still can't manage it!
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    (Original post by Gwalchgwyn)
    I can't help but feel that you know im mildly correct and so try to change the subject into a personal attack in an attempt gain superiority.
    See my post above.
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    (Original post by JamesyB)
    You have now. Ubuntu is so easy to install, you can even do it straight from windows for those that still can't manage it!
    I hate dual booting its to slow might muck up your hard drive
    but its useful if you want to do various tasks :cool:
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    (Original post by blueray)
    I hate dual booting its to slow might muck up your hard drive
    but its useful if you want to do various tasks :cool:
    I've got Win7, Vista (stupid recovery partition) and ubuntu all on the same hard drive on my laptop. Still as quick today as it was the day I got it.... :P Just needs a little care and attention :P
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    Since I installed Slackware the otherday, I realised I had to upgrade VMware to make sure vmware-tools was up to date and could handle the 2.6 kernel.

    I did that, then I had a problem with X because the mouse and keyboard drivers were being disabled for some stupid reason. But it was pretty easy to fix (it was in the log file). I just had to add 1 line to /etc/X11/xorg.conf and all was fixed.

    Now I am using KDE which is a bit annoying. I want to switch to fluxbox, but I think I'm not able to use the 'drag and drop' feature with vmwaretools

    I've just been fiddling with it for the last few days. Its good fun
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    (Original post by JamesyB)
    I've got Win7, Vista (stupid recovery partition) and ubuntu all on the same hard drive on my laptop. Still as quick today as it was the day I got it.... :P Just needs a little care and attention :P
    Yeah i just dont want to muck it up
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    I used to run Slackware under colinux or occasionally VM until my last external drive (which I'd installed it on) started cocking up, and then after that I reinstalled XP on this cruddy laptop. I've not got round to sorting it out again yet.
    Trying to boot from USB is just a giant pain so I don't bother with that, though I also used it for dual boot back when I had my desktop machine.

    I use the Backtrack live CD fairly often though.

    I'm pondering whether to install something better (Slackware ^^) when I eventually get another machine. Windows is increasingly annoying me these days...
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    (Original post by Gwalchgwyn)
    Because it doesn't work. Its just an OS without any user functionality - its basically windows without menus, toolbars, any working drivers or software support, 90% of the time you have to write a decent kernel to get stuff done and over 9000 neckbeards who complain that home users arn't using it when its so much better.

    The reason it runs smoother and "less bloated" is because theres feck all there. Its for script-kiddies who think looking for a script online to organize a directory into backwards alphabetical order means they are born hackerz.

    Yes i mad, and i dont know why.
    Completely wrong.

    Look above, I installed Slackware which is usually considered a more difficult distro to work with in under an hour. Everything was working correctly when I started it.

    The only modifications I have had to make were minor and only because I was using Linux within VMWare, which means VMware-tools had to be installed and configured.

    Some of the more desktop orientated distros are much better than Windows. Most people simply do not feel comfortable with *nix based systems, because its quite different to Windows. You would get a very similar reaction from non-tech type of people using Mac for the first time and I definately think Macs are much more user friendly and much better overall than Windows.

    You say Linux has no user functionality? Are you mad? Linux is configurable down to the very nitty gritty. That may not be useful to everybody and sometimes can be its downfall for someone looking for something very simple and basic - but Windows and MS products in general are the ones lacking functionality. With windows - if everything works out of the box, you are fine. If however it doesn't - you are absolutely ****ed a lot of the time. Whereas in Linux, its usually very simple and easy to find the source of the problem and rectify it.

    Also Linux is nothing like Windows - so your next statement is just a load of garbage. Without menus and toolbars? What drugs have you smoked? Most of the window managers for X are much better than Windows. Also, there is a great variety. If you want a heavily GUI dependant environment you have options such as Gnome and KDE. If on the other hand you want a very lightweight GUI, you have options such as Fluxbox and Blackbox. They look better, they work better, they are much more functional than the resource draining Windows interface.

    You go on to say 'theres **** all there'. Another absurd observation. What does Linux lack that any of its competitors has?

    Also Linux is still very much a developing project that hasn't reached its peak in my opinion. Its not far off though and I think within the next 5 - 10 years it will become much more influential. Not saying that it hasn't been influential over the last 10 years or so.

    By the way this is coming from someone who hasn't used anything BUT windows for the last 7-8 years.

    Edit: Just to say Linux software support exists and there is tonnes of it out there. The only time it will lack is when you are using a very obscure/rare peice of software and land into a problem that others haven't experienced. There are tonnes of guides/How-tos out there which are very simple and easy to follow for anyone with a reading age above 10.

    I'm not saying Linux is for everybody, because its not. But its defiantely improving and the desktop solutions offered by Linux distros will be competing much more with Windows in the coming years.

    Linux is also being used ever more by manufacturers as the pre-installed OS on a lot of netbooks. This is a good sign.
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    (Original post by blueray)
    Yeah i just dont want to muck it up
    I say this to you, you DON'T need to re-partition your drive, and if the install goes wrong (I.e. incompatible hardware, however unlikely), just uninstall inside Windows!! It will run a little slower, but that's not as bad as it sounds.

    See here:

    http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ub...dows-installer
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    Ubuntu 10.6
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    (Original post by Steph90)
    Completely wrong.

    Look above, I installed Slackware which is usually considered a more difficult distro to work with in under an hour. Everything was working correctly when I started it.

    The only modifications I have had to make were minor and only because I was using Linux within VMWare, which means VMware-tools had to be installed and configured.

    Some of the more desktop orientated distros are much better than Windows. Most people simply do not feel comfortable with *nix based systems, because its quite different to Windows. You would get a very similar reaction from non-tech type of people using Mac for the first time and I definately think Macs are much more user friendly and much better overall than Windows.

    You say Linux has no user functionality? Are you mad? Linux is configurable down to the very nitty gritty. That may not be useful to everybody and sometimes can be its downfall for someone looking for something very simple and basic - but Windows and MS products in general are the ones lacking functionality. With windows - if everything works out of the box, you are fine. If however it doesn't - you are absolutely ****ed a lot of the time. Whereas in Linux, its usually very simple and easy to find the source of the problem and rectify it.

    Also Linux is nothing like Windows - so your next statement is just a load of garbage. Without menus and toolbars? What drugs have you smoked? Most of the window managers for X are much better than Windows. Also, there is a great variety. If you want a heavily GUI dependant environment you have options such as Gnome and KDE. If on the other hand you want a very lightweight GUI, you have options such as Fluxbox and Blackbox. They look better, they work better, they are much more functional than the resource draining Windows interface.

    You go on to say 'theres **** all there'. Another absurd observation. What does Linux lack that any of its competitors has?

    Also Linux is still very much a developing project that hasn't reached its peak in my opinion. Its not far off though and I think within the next 5 - 10 years it will become much more influential. Not saying that it hasn't been influential over the last 10 years or so.

    By the way this is coming from someone who hasn't used anything BUT windows for the last 7-8 years.

    Edit: Just to say Linux software support exists and there is tonnes of it out there. The only time it will lack is when you are using a very obscure/rare peice of software and land into a problem that others haven't experienced. There are tonnes of guides/How-tos out there which are very simple and easy to follow for anyone with a reading age above 10.

    I'm not saying Linux is for everybody, because its not. But its defiantely improving and the desktop solutions offered by Linux distros will be competing much more with Windows in the coming years.

    Linux is also being used ever more by manufacturers as the pre-installed OS on a lot of netbooks. This is a good sign.
    This - most online web users use linux.
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    (Original post by MadnessRed)
    Interesting, since 2008 I have not had any trouble with any wireless cards. (If only the same could be said about windows).
    I fail to see how you could have bought a network card which doesn't work in Windows. 99% of PC network cards are used by Windows, so manufacturers ensure they have fully functional plug-and-play drivers before putting them on sale. Similarly with routers, printers, scanners, MP3 players, etc. I have never bought any hardware in about the last decade that wasn't instant plug-and-play in Windows.

    Meanwhile I have had personal experience of a router, three different printers, four different network cards, and a modem all being Linux-incompatible, at various points in time. And as for ATI graphics drivers...

    (Original post by MadnessRed)
    Sys-Rq and Control-Alt-F* really are for people who know what they are doing. The should pretty much never be used unless you are majorly messing with something, (or you just like the feeling of power they give).
    If X fails in some major way (not uncommon), control-alt-F is what you have to do. I have probably had to use Ctrl-Alt-F several hundred times.

    (Original post by MadnessRed)
    The different copy and paste I have only noticed in Terminal, where it's control, shift and c/v. However, this is because control + c cancels, which predates the clipboard, at least you can copy and paste at all in terminal with the keyboard, in windows you have to select the text then go looking in the edit menu in cmd.
    Terminal - ctrl shift c

    Gnome/KDE X programs - ctrl c

    generic X programs, or Linux h4ckers who think anything involving ctrl-c is for wusses - highlight to copy, middle mouse button to paste. Plus then it is "mark and paste", not "copy and paste", which is even more awkward, and you end up accidentally highlighting something else and it all goes wrong.

    Emacs, so beloved of a good proportion of Linux users: ctrl-w, ctrl y and I think maybe some other key. This is a totally different mechanism again, "yanking", whereby you have to cycle through previous things you have copied in a bizarre and confusing fashion. And god forbid you want to undo several actions which included copy pasting, and then redo them again. They might as well have gone the full hog and made the copy/paste system multi-dimensional and n-directional, it couldn't get much worse.

    Vi - god knows

    (Original post by MadnessRed)
    The file system is a bit confusing at first, but it is in no way indecipherable, in fact it is so clear Microsoft decided to copy it.
    Linux
    /home/#username#/Documents
    /home/#username#/Music
    /home/#username#/Pictures

    Old Windows
    C:\Documents and Settings\#username#\My Documents
    C:\Documents and Settings\#username#\My Documents\My Music
    C:\Documents and Settings\#username#\My Documents\My Pictures

    New Windows
    C:\Users\#username#\Documents
    C:\Users\#username#\Music
    C:\Users\#username#\Pictures

    The short names, var, usr, sys may seem offputting. But when you consider that the people who have any reason to be using the folders will probably in command line. The lack of spaces means escaping characters isn't necessary and the short names make it easier to type. Really, you do no need to be anywhere outside of /home/#username#/ unless you are fiddling, and the filesystem is designed to be helpful towards fiddlers.
    Microsoft did not "copy it", having users directories under one parent directory is just a blatantly obvious idea.

    But if you want to know which directory documentation for a gnome or kde program is in (usr/share/? usr/share/kde/doc? usr/share/kde/nameofprogram/doc? usr/local? usr/local/kde? some combination of the above? plus some other possibilities I have forgotten). Or where a game has installed itself (opt? usr/share? /usr/local? /usr/local/games? /home/yourname?).

    And as for the difference between /var and /tmp, or the difference between /proc and /sys, or what on earth is going on with things like init.d...

    (Original post by MadnessRed)
    Installing software in Linux can be a lot easier than Windows.
    As long as the program is both sufficiently open source and sufficiently popular to have a package available, that is. If meanwhile you want a little known game, or almost any commercial closed-source software. Like you know Flash, itunes, mathematics modelling software, Photoshop, the vast majority of games, MS Office, skype (still had major Linux issues a year ago), msn messenger, commercial software development tools, video editing software, commercial web browser add ons, easy-ti-use GUI freeware tools, etc, etc...

    And have you ever tried making an Ubuntu package? I refer you to the twenty billion page Debian Policy guidelines, the 5 billion page Ubuntu packaging guide, pbuilder, dbuild, and warmly welcome you to the wonderful world of chroots. Meanwhile in Windows it takes a freeware install program and about 10 minutes of writing a 10 line ini file.
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    (Original post by Tathrim)
    I say this to you, you DON'T need to re-partition your drive, and if the install goes wrong (I.e. incompatible hardware, however unlikely), just uninstall inside Windows!! It will run a little slower, but that's not as bad as it sounds.

    See here:

    http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/get-ub...dows-installer
    Oh wow that looks good! wont it have a slow boot time then? Or make windows slower how do I choose what I want to use?
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    I use Linux Poseidon. Love it.
    It has some bugs, but it is the idea behind linux to configure the system to your liking.
 
 
 
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