Perfect 45 points Watch

RandomUser7
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#81
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#81
good for you

and follow the thread... it's a perfectly good continuation of the discussion

P.s nice detective skills... not like I have my name as my account or anything ha
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Lingo09
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#82
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(Original post by Ishamo)
good for you

and follow the thread... it's a perfectly good continuation of the discussion

P.s nice detective skills... not like I have my name as my account or anything ha
definitely :P
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summer_l
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#83
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only some 60-something people WORLDWIDE achieve the top score each year...
that's a very small percentage, so it's a little ridiculous that cambridge still asks for a 43+
if they do seem to understand the IB, i don't get why they can't give more generous offers.
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FiniteMr
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#84
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(Original post by summer_l)
only some 60-something people WORLDWIDE achieve the top score each year...
that's a very small percentage, so it's a little ridiculous that cambridge still asks for a 43+
if they do seem to understand the IB, i don't get why they can't give more generous offers.
Its more around 100 people every year, and Cambridge's average offer is 39/40. 43 is only for artsy subject combinations, which are of course easier to get the higher end marks in.
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The Man of the Hour
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First, stats about getting 45 points: Let’s first calculate the number of people in IB in a typical year using the statistical bulletins for May 2010 and November 2009. 37,919 people (May passes) + 10603 (fails) + 4,417 (November 09 passes) + 1086 (November fails) = 54,025 people who wrote exams in a typical year, although this number is climbing every year. Now, how many got the 45? 96 (May) + 31 (November)= 127 people. 127/54025 x 100= 0.235% of candidates that get the 45 in a year. While I’m clearly combining two different sets of exams and while the process is not exactly rigorous, it’s safe to say that this number is extraordinarily small. I have heard of people being asked for 45 at Cam…and this is what they are asking you for. Get in the top 0.235% of these candidates…and meet their expectations for interviews, whatnot.

But let’s be fair: let’s take Hypocrism’s average of 40 points as your admission offer. 2560 in May got 40 points or more, and 709 got 40 points or more in November 09. 3269 people out of 54025 x 100= 6.05% of candidates get 40 points or more. The fact is...the top 6% of IB students are eligible to go to Cambridge. That's a pretty fair deal. Cam is one of the most well-established educational institutions on the planet, and it makes sense that only the top 6% are eligible. If this is an average score required for entrance, you have no right to complain. If you are being asked to get 45 in order to enter their arts programmes, however…there’s an issue. That’s just nutty—that’s expecting you to be BEYOND the top 0.3% of the world. And I can honestly tell you…it’s harder to get a 7 in English HL than it is to get a 7 in HL Physics. I got a 6 in HL Physics and I was hardly the ideal student, nor did I even have a well-established course/teacher to help me. I got a 6 in HL English, even with an experienced teacher and lots of help from IB teachers who had been teaching the course for years! At least statistically…there does seem to be something unfair about IB admission processes. I can see why some of you would be complaining about what you are being asked for.

http://www.ibo.org/facts/statbulleti...albulletin.pdf
http://www.ibo.org/facts/statbulleti...alBulletin.pdf

Maybe someone could respond to this by doing the math for the A-Levels results using a typical average (A*AA). I don't feel like I'm capable-- I'm only from Canada and I don't know much about the A-Levels system.
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FiniteMr
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#86
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(Original post by The Man of the Hour)
First, stats about getting 45 points: Let’s first calculate the number of people in IB in a typical year using the statistical bulletins for May 2010 and November 2009. 37,919 people (May passes) + 10603 (fails) + 4,417 (November 09 passes) + 1086 (November fails) = 54,025 people who wrote exams in a typical year, although this number is climbing every year. Now, how many got the 45? 96 (May) + 31 (November)= 127 people. 127/54025 x 100= 0.235% of candidates that get the 45 in a year. While I’m clearly combining two different sets of exams and while the process is not exactly rigorous, it’s safe to say that this number is extraordinarily small. I have heard of people being asked for 45 at Cam…and this is what they are asking you for. Get in the top 0.235% of these candidates…and meet their expectations for interviews, whatnot.

But let’s be fair: let’s take Hypocrism’s average of 40 points as your admission offer. 2560 in May got 40 points or more, and 709 got 40 points or more in November 09. 3269 people out of 54025 x 100= 6.05% of candidates get 40 points or more. The fact is...the top 6% of IB students are eligible to go to Cambridge. That's a pretty fair deal. Cam is one of the most well-established educational institutions on the planet, and it makes sense that only the top 6% are eligible. If this is an average score required for entrance, you have no right to complain. If you are being asked to get 45 in order to enter their arts programmes, however…there’s an issue. That’s just nutty—that’s expecting you to be BEYOND the top 0.3% of the world. And I can honestly tell you…it’s harder to get a 7 in English HL than it is to get a 7 in HL Physics. I got a 6 in HL Physics and I was hardly the ideal student, nor did I even have a well-established course/teacher to help me. I got a 6 in HL English, even with an experienced teacher and lots of help from IB teachers who had been teaching the course for years! At least statistically…there does seem to be something unfair about IB admission processes. I can see why some of you would be complaining about what you are being asked for.

http://www.ibo.org/facts/statbulleti...albulletin.pdf
http://www.ibo.org/facts/statbulleti...alBulletin.pdf

Maybe someone could respond to this by doing the math for the A-Levels results using a typical average (A*AA). I don't feel like I'm capable-- I'm only from Canada and I don't know much about the A-Levels system.
I haven't seen a single source saying Cambridge asked for a 45.
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Aeschylus
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#87
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I've seen a 43 offer from Cambridge, never seen a 45. Of my friends who got into Oxford, everyone but me was asked for a 38 (I had 40). I think what people were pointing out that while the top 6% of people going to Cambridge seems fair, how many people get AAA or A*AA?
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heymanbarca
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(Original post by Hypocrism)
I haven't seen a single source saying Cambridge asked for a 45.
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...eterhouse%2045
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FiniteMr
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#89
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(Original post by Aeschylus)
I've seen a 43 offer from Cambridge, never seen a 45. Of my friends who got into Oxford, everyone but me was asked for a 38 (I had 40). I think what people were pointing out that while the top 6% of people going to Cambridge seems fair, how many people get AAA or A*AA?
Easily more than 6%, and definitely a higher proportion than people getting 40+.

I really don't trust some post on a forum saying their offer was 45 - it seems completely fake. Is there any other mention anywhere of a 45 offer, because if not, it is certainly a lie.
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Aeschylus
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(Original post by Hypocrism)
Easily more than 6%, and definitely a higher proportion than people getting 40+.

I really don't trust some post on a forum saying their offer was 45 - it seems completely fake. Is there any other mention anywhere of a 45 offer, because if not, it is certainly a lie.
Definetly a lie. Universities use the IB's point system to give higher grades than A levels because they want the very very brightest but asking for a 45 is a near impossible task. It's a phenomenal amount of work. Most of the 45s in the world come from 2 or 3 schools.
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The Man of the Hour
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#91
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From certain articles from the Guardian, I've seen an average of 6% of students in a certain town or city get an A*, but it doesn't really give stats on whether these individuals get As as well. Presumably, however, more than 6% of A-Levels students get the A*AA that is normally required.
And the 45-- I'm still taking it as legit. You are presuming he/she is lying, and without sufficient proof, I might add. From what I've seen, 44 points is also an offer from Cam...so why doesn't a 45 offer seem true?

EDIT: Does anyone have the statistical bulletin for A-Levels, if such an item exists? We have to kind of measure it to see if 6% of people actually get A*AA in general...which is ENTIRELY possible given the large # of students taking these exams...
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FiniteMr
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#92
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(Original post by The Man of the Hour)
From certain articles from the Guardian, I've seen an average of 6% of students in a certain town or city get an A*, but it doesn't really give stats on whether these individuals get As as well. Presumably, however, more than 6% of A-Levels students get the A*AA that is normally required.
And the 45-- I'm still taking it as legit. You are presuming he/she is lying, and without sufficient proof, I might add. From what I've seen, 44 points is also an offer from Cam...so why doesn't a 45 offer seem true?

EDIT: Does anyone have the statistical bulletin for A-Levels, if such an item exists? We have to kind of measure it to see if 6% of people actually get A*AA in general...which is ENTIRELY possible given the large # of students taking these exams...
Actually, we had several 43/44 offers from Oxbridge at my school over the last few years, and after complaints they admitted it was an error and lowered every single one to 40, which seems to be their typical offer. The highest I've seen proof of is a 42.
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Commando3200
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#93
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According to this, 24% of AQA A Levels students receive either an A or an A*. 6.8% of all students receive an A*.

It doesn't show the results of three A Levels combined, so unless someone finds a better source, it looks like more people get As and A*s than 40+ points in IB.

Unless my reasoning is wrong... Thoughts?
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FiniteMr
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(Original post by Commando3200)
According to this, 24% of AQA A Levels students receive either an A or an A*. 6.8% of all students receive an A*.

It doesn't show the results of three A Levels combined, so unless someone finds a better source, it looks like more people get As and A*s than 40+ points in IB.

Unless my reasoning is wrong... Thoughts?
That assumes each A* from an individual student is around 7% chance. Realistically, most students who get one A* are going to get all A* or A, because they have the ability and probably the guidance from teachers.

So the A/A* pupils are probably around the same percentage as 40+, but remember that IB's 40+ statistic is likely a little more realistic - I expect that a higher proportion of people doing IB, especially in the UK alone, are aiming to go to university while the A-level statistics seem likely to be bogged down by the many students who have aims outside their academic curriculum - a proportion which I expect is higher than in the IB. So, out of the people "serious" about their studies, the A/A* group will seem less exclusive while in the "serious" IB crowd, the 40+ bracket will still be about as exclusive as it seems from the statistic.
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dbmag9
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Hmm, this seems like an amusing thread. My subjects etc. are in my signature*.

OP: aim to get lots of points, but don't aim at a specific value. IB marking is too inconsistent and unpredictable to do that to any degree of certainty. My ToK essay was amazing and I got a B, my German is terrible and I got a 7. I worked moderately hard, especially right before exams (although I still ran my school's cadet inspection during the exam weeks), but the rest of the time I did more interesting things. Then again, perhaps you're one of these people who can actually revise effectively without imminent pressure. The only way I could get myself to revise was to do timed practice papers ad nauseam.

As for A-levels vs. IB, in terms of actual difficulty IB seems to have it harder (my school offered both), but a lot of that was due to everything happening in one go, and there being more subjects. In terms of content different subjects go different ways - IB Philosophy seems much nicer than A-level, whereas the teachers at my school definitely preferred A-level to IB Latin. I never found Maths that hard, but I was definitely in a minority with that.

As for offers and statistics, I'm fairly sure a friend of mine has a 43 offer for Oxford (PPE) at the moment, and someone in my year didn't get into Cambridge (Engineering) because he needed a 7 in Maths. Around 90 or so seem to get 45 each summer worldwide, but I'm pretty certain the majority of those are in the UK (I asked them to provide country-based statistics but they said they couldn't) - my school had two 45's, KCS Wimbledon had 10, and I'm sure Sevenoaks and North London Collegiate have quite a few more.

*Didn't realise I'd taken subjects out of my signature: I did HL Maths, Physics, Philosophy, and Latin, and SL German and English. My EE was on Philosophy.
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FiniteMr
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#96
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(Original post by dbmag9)
Hmm, this seems like an amusing thread. My subjects etc. are in my signature*.

OP: aim to get lots of points, but don't aim at a specific value. IB marking is too inconsistent and unpredictable to do that to any degree of certainty. My ToK essay was amazing and I got a B, my German is terrible and I got a 7. I worked moderately hard, especially right before exams (although I still ran my school's cadet inspection during the exam weeks), but the rest of the time I did more interesting things. Then again, perhaps you're one of these people who can actually revise effectively without imminent pressure. The only way I could get myself to revise was to do timed practice papers ad nauseam.

As for A-levels vs. IB, in terms of actual difficulty IB seems to have it harder (my school offered both), but a lot of that was due to everything happening in one go, and there being more subjects. In terms of content different subjects go different ways - IB Philosophy seems much nicer than A-level, whereas the teachers at my school definitely preferred A-level to IB Latin. I never found Maths that hard, but I was definitely in a minority with that.

As for offers and statistics, I'm fairly sure a friend of mine has a 43 offer for Oxford (PPE) at the moment, and someone in my year didn't get into Cambridge (Engineering) because he needed a 7 in Maths. Around 90 or so seem to get 45 each summer worldwide, but I'm pretty certain the majority of those are in the UK (I asked them to provide country-based statistics but they said they couldn't) - my school had two 45's, KCS Wimbledon had 10, and I'm sure Sevenoaks and North London Collegiate have quite a few more.

*Didn't realise I'd taken subjects out of my signature: I did HL Maths, Physics, Philosophy, and Latin, and SL German and English. My EE was on Philosophy.
Josef's offer is only 41 points (did I guess correctly?)
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dbmag9
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#97
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(Original post by Hypocrism)
Josef's offer is only 41 points (did I guess correctly?)
Is it? My bad. But shouldn't you be revising?
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