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    (Original post by Mess.)
    Because it doesn't just have an impact on the decision maker, it is the grunts that suffer.
    This is very true and I've already given you +rep so I can't rep you again


    I'd use the example of longer sunday trading during the Olympics. No one at my store was asked if we wanted to do it, we were told that Sundays we'd be open 10-6 not 11-5 and that was it.
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    (Original post by Bronco2012)
    The you're a bit of a noblet as it's very easy to just stock up on christmas eve.
    Stock up and just throw away unused stuff? Unless you're an idiot that likes to waste food and money.
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    This is actually a really difficult logistical and ethical question imo. On the one hand, what gives the government the right to dictate the hours businesses can trade - this includes Sunday opening times, the laws regarding this are frankly medieval and ridiculous.

    On the other hand, employees who celebrate Christmas will either be unwilling or outright refuse to work on Christmas Day.

    I've had to work Christmas Day twice (I used to work for an airline), and it's really a s*** feeling - the whole country stops for the festivities, and you can't even enjoy a cheeky champagne until after you finish work.

    Maybe a compromise - businesses may choose to open on Christmas Day, but on the condition that they cannot force employees to work - i.e. they either find employees willing to work then or not open?
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    No, it is not necessary in my opinion. Shops are open every other day of the year.
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    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    Stock up and just throw away unused stuff? Unless you're an idiot that likes to waste food and money.
    Well then just accept that you can't buy food on christmas day it's really not hard
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    It doesn't seem very necessary but it depends on the actual shop and whether they can get staff I guess.
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    (Original post by Bronco2012)
    Well then just accept that you can't buy food on christmas day it's really not hard
    Or few supermarkets would be open and the staff who would be working for few hours on that day would get double pay. Or at least few smaller branches of e.g. Tesco would be open for few hours. Like on Easter, I went to Tesco superstore but it was closed down, but luckily Tesco express was open :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    Or few supermarkets would be open and the staff who would be working for few hours on that day would get double pay. Or at least few smaller branches of e.g. Tesco would be open for few hours. Like on Easter, I went to Tesco superstore but it was closed down, but luckily Tesco express was open :rolleyes:
    But why? What's the advantage to this? It's incredibly simple to stock up on christmas eve.
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    NO. Think of the workers for goodness sake. Businesses will force them to go in, they have to spend ages Christmas eve there it'll be so unfair to allow the bosses to make them work Christmas day as well. Can't we just have one peaceful day without Tescos being open.
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    Yes, if they have volunteers to work. They should not force people to work. My guess is though, paying double, there would be enough volunteers (for at least reduced hours).
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    Should they be allowed to? Yes. But there's two problems:

    1) How on Earth are shops going to find the staff to function on Christmas Day? The vast majority of employees are going to want to stay home, open presents, eat turkey and visit family.

    2) Where's the demand? There's virtually nobody who would go shopping on Christmas.
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    Should they be allowed to open? Yes.

    Should they open is another kettle of fish. It's now become a holiday tradition to have the day off working (for most people, not people like hospital workers and shelter volunteers etc) and spend it at home with family and presents and the lunch, or visit relatives and friends or go on holiday. I think it would be impossible to change Christmas day to a working day, where people could be called into work. It just wouldn't work now unless it was done on a volunteering-to-work basis, or people were bribed with short shifts and time and a half or double pay.

    I do think, however, on a general note that it's nice (for lack of a better word right now) to spend a day out of the retail shops. Imagine going to the sales on Christmas day? That's a bit upsetting/sad to think about for many reasons you can imagine. Maybe supermarkets could be the only exception and petrol stations (? I'm not sure if these are open anyway...I presume not but don't actually know) in case a family runs out of fuel or needs some food.

    But personally, I don't think any shops open is necessary. It's fine as it is now. But, yes they should be allowed to open if they really wish to, why not? I suppose not everybody celebrates Christmas.
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    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    No, no, no What if a corner shop doesn't have what you need and only a supermarket has, the thing you need is essential and you cannot be without it?
    Deal with it. If a corner shop doesn't have it that it's something you won't desperately need :P
    People need a break too.
    I am pretty sure you can survive without one item for a day :rolleyes:
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    I don't see why there should be a law dictating the opening times of shops...

    Maybe a law saying workers can not be forced to work on their chosen religious Anual holiday. Then everyone is happy, people who dont celebrate christmas (or sunday) get shops and people who do still get their holidy.

    What reason does the government have for saying shops can't open Sunday?? Its stupid
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    (Original post by navarre)
    Should they be allowed to? Yes. But there's two problems:

    1) How on Earth are shops going to find the staff to function on Christmas Day? The vast majority of employees are going to want to stay home, open presents, eat turkey and visit family.

    2) Where's the demand? There's virtually nobody who would go shopping on Christmas.
    not in multicultural britain :confused:
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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    not in multicultural britain :confused:
    Um yes... in Britain.
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    Doesn't matter what religion the workers are (xmas isn't even Xian anyway). I believe it's infringing on our human rights to force closure.
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    (Original post by Treeroy)
    Doesn't matter what religion the workers are (xmas isn't even Xian anyway). I believe it's infringing on our human rights to force closure.
    Do let me know which of your human rights it infringes...
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    Do let me know which of your human rights it infringes...
    I think, in essence, it's a right to do what you want unless it violates someone else's rights. Running a shop on Xmas day doesn't do that, so shouldn't be illegal.
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    Why not? I think they should be able to. We're supposed to be secular.
 
 
 
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