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    (Original post by Tamora)
    A united Ireland might become the majority opinion among the public, but does it have any political support outside Sinn Fein?
    Does it really need to until it becomes popular opinion among the public? Everyone is aware of the clause in place to take the vote. Parties will become aware when public opinion wants it and most likely push for it then. Ireland is littered with parties pushing for reforms ad hoc when the public want something. Of course, for now it is only educated speculation.
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    (Original post by ANB1993)
    Does it really need to until it becomes popular opinion among the public? Everyone is aware of the clause in place to take the vote. Parties will become aware when public opinion wants it and most likely push for it then. Ireland is littered with parties pushing for reforms ad hoc when the public want something. Of course, for now it is only educated speculation.
    So none of the major parties support a united Ireland. Any supporters of a united Ireland must build their support from the bottom up. I hope you have more luck with that (if it's what you want) than we in England have with any thing that might benefit the wider general public.
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    (Original post by Tamora)
    So none of the major parties support a united Ireland. Any supporters of a united Ireland must build their support from the bottom up. I hope you have more luck with that (if it's what you want) than we in England have with any thing that might benefit the wider general public.
    Frankly I do not care whether we remain in the Union or not. I go to university in England and will most likely not return t Ireland. Which leads to the next major problem facing both north and south; Mass emigration.
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    I am currently studying it now for my AS History exam (but only up the 1920's, when the Irish Free State and Northern Ireland were established). But, I don't know that much about what happens after this though . I need to read some more about Irish history over the summer holidays I think.
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    (Original post by CelticSymphony67)
    Easter is a very special time for us Irish, as it is the Anniversary of the Easter Rising in Dublin, when we finally had enough of English Rule. The relationship between Ireland and the UK has never been better, and whilst the IRA did some terrible things since 1969, lets not beat about the bush. The English did no good in Ireland, they brought Wars, Famines, Destruction, and partition of our country. Even though I have lived in the UK for a long time and have lots of English friends, I will always wear my Easter Lily when I think of our Fenian dead, who fought and died, against English Brutality.

    That's a very simplistic view. The people of Dublin were disgusted at the Rising because of the damage it did to the city and because many had loved ones fighting for the British Army in WW1.

    Celebrating the Easter Rising is something of a fabrication. We do it because we could never celebrate the War of Independence because the divisions the outcome caused. That was Ireland's truly democratic revolution, Sinn Fein had a mandate from the people finally fed up and disillusioned of Britain, angry at the execution of Rising leaders, and fearful at the horror of WW1 and the threat of forced conscription in 1918.
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    (Original post by DK_Tipp)
    That's a very simplistic view. The people of Dublin were disgusted at the Rising because of the damage it did to the city and because many had loved ones fighting for the British Army in WW1.

    Celebrating the Easter Rising is something of a fabrication. We do it because we could never celebrate the War of Independence because the divisions the outcome caused. That was Ireland's truly democratic revolution, Sinn Fein had a mandate from the people finally fed up and disillusioned of Britain, angry at the execution of Rising leaders, and fearful at the horror of WW1 and the threat of forced conscription in 1918.
    We celebrate it because it is our Declaration of Independence from Britain, and while you are spot on about the initial reaction to The Rising from local Dubliners. That ill feeling towards the rebels soon evaporated when the British slaughtered the leaders of the Easter Rising. Thousands celebrate the Easter Rising every year, and it is an event we should hold dear to our hearts, as true Irishmen.
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    I count myself pretty lucky that I've had the opportunity to learn about it in History A-Level to be honest. I'd never realised about it before, and it's a pretty significant period.
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    (Original post by Tamora)
    So none of the major parties support a united Ireland. Any supporters of a united Ireland must build their support from the bottom up. I hope you have more luck with that (if it's what you want) than we in England have with any thing that might benefit the wider general public.
    Ummm, Sinn Fein are the second biggest party in NI? The SDLP also claim to support a united Ireland, but they have been less vocal about it of late.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Ummm, Sinn Fein are the second biggest party in NI? The SDLP also claim to support a united Ireland, but they have been less vocal about it of late.
    Last vote did Sinn Fein not actually poll more? (As in, they're the biggest party)

    So there should be at the very least a shared ministry. Not a first and second.
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    (Original post by CelticSymphony67)
    We celebrate it because it is our Declaration of Independence from Britain, and while you are spot on about the initial reaction to The Rising from local Dubliners. That ill feeling towards the rebels soon evaporated when the British slaughtered the leaders of the Easter Rising. Thousands celebrate the Easter Rising every year, and it is an event we should hold dear to our hearts, as true Irishmen.
    Is it really our Declaration of Independence though? The IRB whom the Proclamation credits with organising the Rising had their own Declaration in 1867 which was a more concrete document and laid out a vision for nation based on Republican ideals that valued the labour of it's people and promoted a complete separation of church and state (how we would have benefited from that!). It also reaches out to the British working classes.

    The Proclamation of the provisional government is a much more poetic, flowerier piece of writing. It is sentimental and refers to God and the "dead generations". It's a stirring piece of course but is it really the seed of the nation? It's vision of the country is limited to a single paragraph. The sacrifice of the volunteers the role they played in Irish freedom should be acknowleged. I just don't know if we should take our vision for Ireland from Pearse.
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    I do see you're point of view, and I don't think you are wrong either. I just think that the majority of our people view Easter 1916 as the starting point in the modern fight so to speak for Irish Independance, which culminated in Partition of the island of Ireland and the Irish Free State. I believe in looking back at our history with mostly pride, and not forgetting where we came from. Of course, some of our history is dark too, Civil War and Sexual Abuse to name two.
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    Last vote did Sinn Fein not actually poll more? (As in, they're the biggest party)

    So there should be at the very least a shared ministry. Not a first and second.
    Are we talking the last election? Then no, otherwise Sinn Fein would have the First Minister's post. The DUP won more seats than Sinn Fein, though they might have more individual supporters across the country, I haven't researched the matter. As it stands, though, they are the lesser of the two largest parties.

    However, I don't know how the polls have changed since that election.
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    I don't even think half the young people of Ireland know the full story of it's recent history, not many of them have a clue about it's history pre 1800 anyway. I'm only interested in Irish history up to the 1600's, after that the place went to hell. I'm originally from a strong Nationalist area in the countryside, just 2 years ago my next door neighbours house was raided by the police as he was a 'suspect' for a bombing, he turned out to be innocent, his children were dragged from their beds in the morning.

    In terms of my opinion on a united Ireland, I am not sure, A surprising amount of people from ROI couldn't care less about us and don't want re-unification, this angers me as many northerners gave their lives for their republic, most people in the UK couldn't care less about the N.Ireland unionists so in an ideal world I would support an independent Northern Ireland free from ROI and free from UK but that would never happen, or maybe we could become the 51st US state though when I see sights like the union flag protests and the red hand of Ulster being used as a loyalist symbol it brings out the angry nationalist in me
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Ummm, Sinn Fein are the second biggest party in NI? The SDLP also claim to support a united Ireland, but they have been less vocal about it of late.
    Even they're loosing support on the issue

    http://www.rte.ie/news/2013/0206/366...ro-union-vote/

    People ar elooking south and not liking what they see.
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    (Original post by toddman10)
    I don't even think half the young people of Ireland know the full story of it's recent history, not many of them have a clue about it's history pre 1800 anyway. I'm only interested in Irish history up to the 1600's, after that the place went to hell. I'm originally from a strong Nationalist area in the countryside, just 2 years ago my next door neighbours house was raided by the police as he was a 'suspect' for a bombing, he turned out to be innocent, his children were dragged from their beds in the morning.

    In terms of my opinion on a united Ireland, I am not sure, A surprising amount of people from ROI couldn't care less about us and don't want re-unification, this angers me as many northerners gave their lives for their republic, most people in the UK couldn't care less about the N.Ireland unionists so in an ideal world I would support an independent Northern Ireland free from ROI and free from UK but that would never happen, or maybe we could become the 51st US state
    I don't just think it's Ireland/Northern Irelands History that people don't care about. There's a general lack of understanding of History everywhere.

    To quote Nye Bevan. 'Why do I need a Chrystal Ball when I can have a history Book.

    I like this guys take on History for sorting out the future.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSd_Ld6X6O8
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    Even they're loosing support on the issue

    http://www.rte.ie/news/2013/0206/366...ro-union-vote/

    People ar elooking south and not liking what they see.

    I don't think you'd find too many in the Republic too keen on taking on costs of an economy heavily dependent on state employment and the sectarian baggage that goes with a statelet where people riot because they don't get to fly a flag either.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    I don't just think it's Ireland/Northern Irelands History that people don't care about. There's a general lack of understanding of History everywhere.

    To quote Nye Bevan. 'Why do I need a Chrystal Ball when I can have a history Book.

    I like this guys take on Hostory for sorting out the future.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSd_Ld6X6O8
    sometimes you would wonder nowadays if people think the world began when their football club was formed
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    (Original post by DK_Tipp)
    I don't think you'd find too many in the Republic too keen on taking on costs of an economy heavily dependent on state employment and the sectarian baggage that goes with a statelet where people riot because they don't get to fly a flag either.
    I remember going out with a girl from the Republic many years ago. She was very indifferent to the problem.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    I remember going out with a girl from the Republic many years ago. She was very indifferent to the problem.
    It's quite sad to see the disconnect between Northern nationalists and Southerners at times. They claim the same flag, the same Republican ideals, they share the same culture and language.

    I think people in the North felt abandoned to Ulster Unionism and it's consequences by the South and people in the Republic felt betrayed and horrified by the the atrocities carried out in the name of Irish Republicanism.
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    (Original post by DK_Tipp)
    It's quite sad to see the disconnect between Northern nationalists and Southerners at times. They claim the same flag, the same Republican ideals, they share the same culture and language.

    I think people in the North felt abandoned to Ulster Unionism and it's consequences by the South and people in the Republic felt betrayed and horrified by the the atrocities carried out in the name of Irish Republicanism.
    I feel more associated with the Ulster flag or the green harp flag than the Irish tri-colour which is unusual I suppose.
 
 
 
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