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Sister caught on speed camera and has no license. What will happen? Watch

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    (Original post by Rybee)
    Meh. I don't see why everyone is taking the moral high ground. I've done worse in the past... Nobody is an angel.
    You are right that nobody is an angel, we all speed from time to time, but i don't think driving on your own without a licence and speeding is really under that category, it's pretty serious. She's a danger to other road users and herself.

    I genuinely don't understand why you are fighting her corner so hard, she has shown from her lighthearted attitude that she doesn't give a **** about the law or the safety of others, or her sister.
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    (Original post by MsCourtney)
    Our faces are similar so that shouldn't be a problem. We have been confused for each other many times.
    admitting intent to take the PCoJ option ... classy move .
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    (Original post by deedee123)
    You are right that nobody is an angel, we all speed from time to time, but i don't think driving on your own without a licence and speeding is really under that category, it's pretty serious. She's a danger to other road users and herself.

    I genuinely don't understand why you are fighting her corner so hard, she has shown from her lighthearted attitude that she doesn't give a **** about the law or the safety of others, or her sister.
    Not fighting her corner. It wasn't her that did it, it was her sister...

    Just stating what she can do about it.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Not quite. The offences under section 143 of the Road Traffic Act, 1988 are (1)using, (2) causing to be used, or (3) permitting a vehicle to be on a road without third party insurance in force.
    It appears to me that following the authority of Chief Constable of Norfolk v Fisher [1992] R.T.R. 93 all the OP would need to be able to say was that she expressly told her sister that she needed to have someone (with a licence etc) in the car with her to satisfy that requirement. (this of course does not constitute legal advice and is a purely theoretical discussion of what 'permission' means in s.143)

    Here's the Westlaw headnote for Fisher:

    Abstract: Where a conditional permission to drive is given, the permission and the conditions attached must be given directly to the proposed driver. D was asked by L to lend him his car. D knew L was disqualified and lent the car to L on condition that L found someone to drive it who was insured to do so. L asked R to drive the car and both L and R assumed R was insured to do so. D knew nothing of the arrangement between L and R. Whilst R was driving there was an accident. R was not insured and D was charged with permitting R to drive whilst uninsured. The justices found that D had given conditional permission for the use of the car to L which extended to R and so dismissed the information.

    Held, allowing the appeal, that in order to establish a conditional permission the conditions would have to have been imposed by D directly on the intended driver, not on someone else. That was not the case here as D had not communicated the conditions to R (Newbury v Davis [1974] R.T.R. 367 explained).
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    (Original post by Norton1)
    It appears to me that following the authority of Chief Constable of Norfolk v Fisher [1992] R.T.R. 93 all the OP would need to say was that she expressly told her sister that she needed to have someone (with a licence etc) in the car with her to satisfy that requirement.

    Here's the Westlaw headnote for Fisher:
    But then she would have a criminal record in the UK.
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    She was speeding, she didn't have a licence, you knew lawfully she was driving it although you didn't know she was speeding.

    Most likely you will get points on your licence for letting her drive in your car when you know she hasn't got a licence and probably not insurance either. You should have known this would happen and shouldn't have taken the risk.
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    (Original post by MsCourtney)
    But then she would have a criminal record in the UK.
    Yes. That's rather the point of the criminal law, no?
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    If your sister is about to move the Canada, why is she also about to take her UK driving test?
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    If your sister is about to move the Canada, why is she also about to take her UK driving test?
    I have no idea why. She initially wanted to move later but changed her mind.

    Also my sister and I have lived both in the UK and Canada at different times in the past.
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    (Original post by yellowcopter)
    She was speeding, she didn't have a licence, you knew lawfully she was driving it although you didn't know she was speeding.

    Most likely you will get points on your licence for letting her drive in your car when you know she hasn't got a licence and probably not insurance either. You should have known this would happen and shouldn't have taken the risk.
    Actually, I wasn't home at the time and she never told me she was taking the car.
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    (Original post by MsCourtney)
    Actually, I wasn't home at the time and she never told me she was taking the car.
    But you have let her in the past :facepalm2:
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    You'll get the fine, the photo is just there for proof Incase you deny it lol they don't care about the driver , atleats the photo is hd
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    (Original post by MsCourtney)
    Actually, I wasn't home at the time and she never told me she was taking the car.
    Stick up or your sis!
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    (Original post by SannaS)
    Stick up or your sis!
    by committing Perjury / perverting the course of Justice ...


    classy ... not!
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    Blood is blood, it's not like she stole your car, she's used it before so she may have thought you'd be alright with it you don't run for the hills when your sister needs help
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    (Original post by MsCourtney)
    Actually, I wasn't home at the time and she never told me she was taking the car.
    Then argue you that in court and nothing will happen if you're innocent and didn't know. If your sister is on your side she will admit to that.
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    ive been through this before..all that will happen will a be a fine sent to your house telling you to pay up, however if it wasn't you driving at the time in question you state who was.Its up to you to tell the truth.I very highly doubt they will try to gather evidence by wasting resources proving who was driving the car at that time.
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    If you lie about who was driving you are committing perjury, a criminal offence. Whilst it is unlikely you will be found out, if you are you and your sister will face criminal proceedings and could see prison time as a result, if you show a particularly bad attitude (which you do, in general, toward driving). This would come into play if at any point you were living in or returned to the UK.

    Are you sure it is worth it? Maybe your sister should face the consequences of her wrongdoing, that is, driving above the speed limit without insurance or a valid license. If she had been involved in an accident, driving without insurance would have made life very difficult for the other person(s) involved. Do you or your sister care about the effects you have on other people, or about other people at all?
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    (Original post by Pigling)
    If you lie about who was driving you are committing perjury, a criminal offence. Whilst it is unlikely you will be found out, if you are you and your sister will face criminal proceedings and could see prison time as a result, if you show a particularly bad attitude (which you do, in general, toward driving). This would come into play if at any point you were living in or returned to the UK.

    Are you sure it is worth it? Maybe your sister should face the consequences of her wrongdoing, that is, driving above the speed limit without insurance or a valid license. If she had been involved in an accident, driving without insurance would have made life very difficult for the other person(s) involved. Do you or your sister care about the effects you have on other people, or about other people at all?
    i think prison sentences will be in the most severest of cases.not really worth mentioning in your post
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    (Original post by rizzl8)
    i think prison sentences will be in the most severest of cases.not really worth mentioning in your post
    She's already made an appearance in court for driving without due care and attention. A conviction overturned is not one forgotten at the discretion of a judge. Also, worst case scenario any investigation reaching her TSR account will easily reveal her extremely poor attitudes and previous offences involving her sister. If you are going to to play chicken with the legal system, it's not smart to host discussions about your numerous indiscretions online.
 
 
 
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