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Is feminism still relevant; what is modern-day feminism like? Watch

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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Bias in how we view crime. In fairness, the Pistorius example is a much better example of racial bias, though. (I should be asleep, not posting :p:) There was a lot of fuss made over the possibility that builders (who would be black) had broken in, before people were willing to accept that a white national hero had committed murder.
    I don't think it's even an example of that You could have made your last sentence read "There was a lot of fuss made over the possibility that builders had broken in, before people were willing to accept that a national hero had committed murder." and it would make sense in any country.
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    (Original post by Hopple)
    I don't think it's even an example of that You could have made your last sentence read "There was a lot of fuss made over the possibility that builders had broken in, before people were willing to accept that a national hero had committed murder." and it would make sense in any country.
    Well I don't have time to dredge up articles on it for you. And a lot of the assumptions aren't that intuitive for English people, because the demographic is different (I grew up in SA). In SA its just assumed that criminals are black :goodnight:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Well I don't have time to dredge up articles on it for you. And a lot of the assumptions aren't that intuitive for English people, because the demographic is different (I grew up in SA). In SA its just assumed that criminals are black :goodnight:
    Oh, I'm not saying race can't be a factor, but the biggest factor in not believing Pistorius killed his girlfriend (on St Valentine's Day too, no less) is that it he is a national hero, regardless of skin colour. You can see this in football often, people will defend their team's players even if they wouldn't defend someone else in the same situation.
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    (Original post by Sheldor)
    I don't see how India is a brilliant example of a feminist hotbed....that law would've been kept because of the traditional gender roles perpetuated by the people, rather than any feminist campaign considering the terrible state of womens rights in the country. Anyway, if we humour this hypothesis, I fail to understand the supposed motive of feminists for preventing this law coming through?

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    They were going to make it gender neutral, however feminist pressure, following the tragic gang rape incident resulted in the government not passing the bill.

    http://www.ndtv.com/article/view/ind...?device=mobile

    articles.timesofindia.indiatimes .com/2013-03-09/india/37580560_1_gender-human-rights-groups-women-activists
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    (Original post by bottled)
    They were going to make it gender neutral, however feminist pressure, following the tragic gang rape incident resulted in the government not passing the bill.

    http://www.ndtv.com/article/view/ind...?device=mobile

    articles.timesofindia.indiatimes .com/2013-03-09/india/37580560_1_gender-human-rights-groups-women-activists
    Umm, no the woman minister was NOT against the gender neutral rape laws (who on earth would be?) She was against the age of consent being lowered to 16.

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    (Original post by chappers-94)
    Umm, no the woman minister was NOT against the gender neutral rape laws (who on earth would be?) She was against the age of consent being lowered to 16.

    Posted from TSR Mobile

    The women's groups and human rights bodies
    want "all parties aligned with women's rights to
    ensure that laws made in the wake of the brutal
    Delhi gang rape case do not leave women even
    more vulnerable than they already are".
    "The report of the Parliamentary Standing
    Committee on the 2012 Criminal Law
    (Amendment) Bill as well as the 2013 Criminal
    Law (Amendment) Ordinance not only violates
    the letter and spirit of the Justice Verma
    Committee (JVC) recommendations but
    endangers and deepens women's vulnerability in
    this country," said representatives of women's
    groups while highlighting the lacunae in the law.
    On the International Women's Day, activists from
    voluntary organizations like Jagori, Saheli,
    Nirantar, Women Against Sexual Violence,
    Lawyers Collective, State Repression Forum
    Against Oppression of Women, Mumbai; and
    Madhya Pradesh Mahila Manch, Indore raised the
    issue in one voice. Several legal luminaries also
    joined the chorus.
    Lawyer Seema Mishra pointed out that one
    pernicious provision of the Ordinance 2013,
    upheld by the Committee report is blanket
    gender neutrality of the perpetrator of sexual
    harassment, assault and rape. "Put simply: unlike
    in existing law where the accused is male, the
    Committee recommendations if enacted into a
    proposed new Bill, will make it possible for women
    to be charged with these offences. This is wholly
    unacceptable," she said.
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    (Original post by bottled)
    The women's groups and human rights bodies
    want "all parties aligned with women's rights to
    ensure that laws made in the wake of the brutal
    Delhi gang rape case do not leave women even
    more vulnerable than they already are".
    "The report of the Parliamentary Standing
    Committee on the 2012 Criminal Law
    (Amendment) Bill as well as the 2013 Criminal
    Law (Amendment) Ordinance not only violates
    the letter and spirit of the Justice Verma
    Committee (JVC) recommendations but
    endangers and deepens women's vulnerability in
    this country," said representatives of women's
    groups while highlighting the lacunae in the law.
    On the International Women's Day, activists from
    voluntary organizations like Jagori, Saheli,
    Nirantar, Women Against Sexual Violence,
    Lawyers Collective, State Repression Forum
    Against Oppression of Women, Mumbai; and
    Madhya Pradesh Mahila Manch, Indore raised the
    issue in one voice. Several legal luminaries also
    joined the chorus.
    Lawyer Seema Mishra pointed out that one
    pernicious provision of the Ordinance 2013,
    upheld by the Committee report is blanket
    gender neutrality of the perpetrator of sexual
    harassment, assault and rape. "Put simply: unlike
    in existing law where the accused is male, the
    Committee recommendations if enacted into a
    proposed new Bill, will make it possible for women
    to be charged with these offences. This is wholly
    unacceptable," she said.
    What? They actually said that? Please provide evidence, because if that is true that's disgusting.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by bertstare)
    Ok so equality is your concern? Explain this to me then:
    What do you need explaining? I think it's pretty self explanatory.
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    (Original post by bottled)
    The women's groups and human rights bodies
    want "all parties aligned with women's rights to
    ensure that laws made in the wake of the brutal
    Delhi gang rape case do not leave women even
    more vulnerable than they already are".
    "The report of the Parliamentary Standing
    Committee on the 2012 Criminal Law
    (Amendment) Bill as well as the 2013 Criminal
    Law (Amendment) Ordinance not only violates
    the letter and spirit of the Justice Verma
    Committee (JVC) recommendations but
    endangers and deepens women's vulnerability in
    this country," said representatives of women's
    groups while highlighting the lacunae in the law.
    On the International Women's Day, activists from
    voluntary organizations like Jagori, Saheli,
    Nirantar, Women Against Sexual Violence,
    Lawyers Collective, State Repression Forum
    Against Oppression of Women, Mumbai; and
    Madhya Pradesh Mahila Manch, Indore raised the
    issue in one voice. Several legal luminaries also
    joined the chorus.
    Lawyer Seema Mishra pointed out that one
    pernicious provision of the Ordinance 2013,
    upheld by the Committee report is blanket
    gender neutrality of the perpetrator of sexual
    harassment, assault and rape. "Put simply: unlike
    in existing law where the accused is male, the
    Committee recommendations if enacted into a
    proposed new Bill, will make it possible for women
    to be charged with these offences. This is wholly
    unacceptable," she said.
    Absolutely revolting, tbh.
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    (Original post by chappers-94)
    What? They actually said that? Please provide evidence, because if that is true that's disgusting.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    http://articles.timesofindia.indiati...omen-activists

    yeah i botched up the linking the first time cause boy. was i tired. but there ya go
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    Out of curiousity, do we have any idea how common female rape of men is? Either assault by penetration, or forced intercourse (does this actually ever successfully happen?!)
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    (Original post by flying plum)
    Out of curiousity, do we have any idea how common female rape of men is? Either assault by penetration, or forced intercourse (does this actually ever successfully happen?!)
    It's probably more common than people think but because of the taboos of humiliation surrounding many men don't report sexual assaults from women.
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    (Original post by Kiss)
    It's probably more common than people think but because of the taboos of humiliation surrounding many men don't report sexual assaults from women.
    No doubt, though the same came be said for female rape statistics. Even given any embarassment/shame in reporting, are there any stats on it?
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    Here's a question for you, how many of you (male) truthfully have actually been a victim of A sexual crime committed by a woman? (From groping to female rape)

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    (Original post by chappers-94)
    Here's a question for you, how many of you (male) truthfully have actually been a victim of A sexual crime committed by a woman? (From groping to female rape)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well? Anyone?

    Didn't think so.
    Edit: my point wad it's so rare that you probably don't even know anyone who has ever been sexually assaulted by a woman.
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    (Original post by flying plum)
    No doubt, though the same came be said for female rape statistics. Even given any embarassment/shame in reporting, are there any stats on it?
    Unfortunately, the legal definition of 'rape' in many jurisdictions does not allow for a female assailant, so any such cases will likely be lumped together with other forms of sexual assault in official statistics. And I have not found any official UK stats which break down the genders of assailants. According to the UK Ministry of Justice "Around 21% of girls and 11% of boys experience some form of child sexual abuse. 23% of women and 3% of men experience sexual assault as an adult. 5% of women and 0.4% of men experience rape. [...] Most perpetrators are male and most victims are female. It is both a consequence and cause of gender inequality." This suggests, but does not prove, that cases of male victim and female assailant are relatively rare.

    In 1994, the U.S. Department of Justice said that "an estimated 91% of the victims of rape and sexual assault are female and 9% are male. Nearly 99% of the offenders they described in single-victim incidents are male." The source given is 'Violence Against Women, Bureau of Justice Statistics, US Department of Justice, 1994', although I have not verified it. Again, this suggests, but does not prove, that cases of male victim and female assailant are relatively rare.

    In a report on 'Youth Victims of Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, 2001 to 2010' from Massachusetts I found a table which states that 13 of 3,546 cases (i.e., 0.3%) were female assailant and male victim, fx, mature females seducing underage boys. NB, this report lumps sexual and domestic violence together, and focuses only on young victims.

    Although all figures in this area are prone to under-reporting, and although US and UK definitions vary, these three sources suggest that the number of male victim / female assailant cases are relatively rare. Nevertheless, they should be treated just as seriously as the more well-known and much more common male assailant / female victim cases.

    As you asking about stats, I should warn you that there is a numptie who keeps posting, in threads like this, stats from an American source ("CDC") which he doesn't remotely understand, despite various attempts to explain them to him. Take his claims and figures with a large pinch of salt.
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    (Original post by Pastaferian)
    Unfortunately, the legal definition of 'rape' in many jurisdictions does not allow for a female assailant, so any such cases will likely be lumped together with other forms of sexual assault in official statistics. And I have not found any official UK stats which break down the genders of assailants. According to the UK Ministry of Justice "Around 21% of girls and 11% of boys experience some form of child sexual abuse. 23% of women and 3% of men experience sexual assault as an adult. 5% of women and 0.4% of men experience rape. [...] Most perpetrators are male and most victims are female. It is both a consequence and cause of gender inequality." This suggests, but does not prove, that cases of male victim and female assailant are relatively rare.

    In 1994, the U.S. Department of Justice said that "an estimated 91% of the victims of rape and sexual assault are female and 9% are male. Nearly 99% of the offenders they described in single-victim incidents are male." The source given is 'Violence Against Women, Bureau of Justice Statistics, US Department of Justice, 1994', although I have not verified it. Again, this suggests, but does not prove, that cases of male victim and female assailant are relatively rare.

    In a report on 'Youth Victims of Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, 2001 to 2010' from Massachusetts I found a table which states that 13 of 3,546 cases (i.e., 0.3%) were female assailant and male victim, fx, mature females seducing underage boys. NB, this report lumps sexual and domestic violence together, and focuses only on young victims.

    Although all figures in this area are prone to under-reporting, and although US and UK definitions vary, these three sources suggest that the number of male victim / female assailant cases are relatively rare. Nevertheless, they should be treated just as seriously as the more well-known and much more common male assailant / female victim cases.

    As you asking about stats, I should warn you that there is a numptie who keeps posting, in threads like this, stats from an American source ("CDC") which he doesn't remotely understand, despite various attempts to explain them to him. Take his claims and figures with a large pinch of salt.
    I appreciate that s. 1 of the SOA defines rape as an activity conducted by a man, but I figured if I put it in inverted commas, I'd get a load of grief. I found the official stats, but I wondered if there were 'unofficial' stats, such as the recently released ones regarding the 'real' incidences of female rape and other sexual violence.

    I'm sure (as with domestic violence) the incidences of male sexual violence are higher than we appreciate, but I have a hard time believing it's 50/50, if you consider even male and female experiences of low level sexual harassment.
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    Out of curiosity, do people think that rape (as in penetration by a penis, regardless of whether victim is male or female) is worse than assault by penetration (s. 2 of SOA), which carries the same potential penalties, but can be committed by either gender. That is, do you think there is a reason why the two offences should be maintained?
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    I'd like to introduce you all to my feminist icon:
    Name:  Elle-Woods-elle-woods-2110408-800-600.jpg
Views: 66
Size:  232.2 KB

    She achieves amazing things and at the same time celebrates her femininity.
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    (Original post by PurpleEyes)
    Well that's your opinion and I'm glad you have it in some instances it's very justified. But on a level that seems "everyday" women are judged about whether they wear makeup or not, wear a short dress or trousers, have short hair or long, have a career or be a mum or both (the list continues). Of course people may do things that gain them more respect, but everyone (men and women) should start from the same equal platform, be treated decently and be given the same opportunities, and neither should be discriminated against for petty reasons.
    Some next bull**** generalisations right here
 
 
 
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