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Edexcel Physics Unit 3 9th May Watch

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    (Original post by rhamill95)
    I think we'll be asked to make a nuclear reactor using the materials supplied (usually consisting of 2 paper clips, a stick of chewing gum and length of thread). It will probably be fusion, as fission is a bit advanced for a-level.
    What the hell are you talking about. There is nothing about fission in Units 1 and 2
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    (Original post by NilFBosh)
    What the hell are you talking about. There is nothing about fission in Units 1 and 2
    They always like to include synoptic and common sense elements.
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    (Original post by rhamill95)
    They always like to include synoptic and common sense elements.
    LOL. Nothing like that will come in the paper. Stop thinking too much
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    (Original post by NilFBosh)
    LOL. Nothing like that will come in the paper. Stop thinking too much
    ok, but just to be safe, ive prepared schematics of my nuclear reactor and am just finishing the prototype.
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    (Original post by NilFBosh)
    What the hell are you talking about. There is nothing about fission in Units 1 and 2
    You do realize that he is joking? :smug:

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    (Original post by Relaxedexams)
    You do realize that he is joking? :smug:

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    Yea I know


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    hours left..... good luck everyone.

    my tutor says they will not ask us to explain Planck constant's theory..
    hard experiments have easy questions
    most of the answers are in the paper itself. FOCUS
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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    What is the difference between metre rule, meter rule, rule and ruler?

    I think measuring g, or finding the refractive index of a liquid or glass shall come
    I reckon they are the only practicals left.
    Or maybe rotation of angle of polarisation or showing independance of verticle and horizontal motion etc or hooks law or efficiency of electrical motor or output of a potential divider or investigating Newton's second law
    A rule is the same thing as a ruler.

    A metre rule is a rule(r) that is 1 metre long.

    "Meter rule" is American spelling, don't use this spelling in an A-level exam.
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    (Original post by NilFBosh)
    Meter and Metre are the same different words but one of them is used in American English and the other in British English.

    A rule is a ruler that starts on the edge and a ruler starts off set from the edge.
    thank you
    Thank you.

    But you didn't think of deleting the thank you when you copied from wikianswers, which is most certainly a wrong answer,
    But is that the real difference?
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    A rule is the same thing as a ruler.

    A metre rule is a rule(r) that is 1 metre long.

    "Meter rule" is American spelling, don't use this spelling in an A-level exam.
    But a British exam board called edexcel used "metre rule".
    I think Pearson being an american company ...lol

    But meter rule can be less or more than one meter? I think a meter ruler is just a ruler measuring in the metric system with mm as the least count.
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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    Thank you.

    But you didn't think of deleting the thank you when you copied from wikianswers, which is most certainly a wrong answer,
    But is that the real difference?
    Rule is just a more "traditional" way of saying ruler. There is no difference.
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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    But a British exam board called edexcel used "metre rule".
    I think Pearson being an american company ...lol
    Yes, "metre rule" is British spelling. So Edexcel is using the British spelling here.

    "Meter rule" is American spelling.
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    Yes, "metre rule" is British spelling. So Edexcel is using the British spelling here.

    "Meter rule" is American spelling.
    So the difference lies in meter and metre, not in rule and ruler.
    It was a bit confusing to see "metre rule". I though metre was supposed to be meter and rule ruler. Centre is in British and center is in American spelling.But i guess it doesn't matter.
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    i just booted up my reactor and although not perfect, its not a bad prototype.
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    Please someone reply to my question on page 4
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    Damn I am a goner in this paper! I cant get anything through my head.
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    (Original post by Silex93)
    Lamalam they are esentially the same thing and are use interchangably for a level physics...that's all you need to know to be honest...And also i have a question...when doing a question in the exam that asks to plan an experiment...DO i have to write a whole essay-type answer with a procedure or can i just answer it as they have it in the marking scheme... For example

    A. (draw labelled diagram)

    B. (list appartus that aren't shown in the diagram)
    And so forthand so forth...
    YES you can answer part by part. a) b) c)
    But don't worry they'll mark it holistically.

    Go through some examiners' reports.
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    (Original post by StUdEnTIGCSE)
    YES you can answer part by part. a) b) c)
    But don't worry they'll mark it holistically.

    Go through some examiners' reports.
    In a question about photoelectric effect. Why is the first ammeter reading zero?


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    (Original post by NilFBosh)
    In a question about photoelectric effect. Why is the first ammeter reading zero?


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    To get stopping voltage.

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    (Original post by NilFBosh)
    In a question about photoelectric effect. Why is the first ammeter reading zero?


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    When you provide a reverse potential difference to the photo voltaic cell work is done against the motion of the phtoelectron. When you increase the voltage across the PV cell the rate of work against the motion of photoelectron (Ve) increases and if it equals or surpasses that of the kinetic energy of the photoelectrons it completely stops them reaching the other electrode. So no current flows through it. So the ammeter ( gulvanometer/picometer) shows zero, and the voltage is recorded to being the stopping voltage for that particular frequency of EM waves.

    What do you mean by "first"?
 
 
 
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