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If your born deaf, what language do you think in? Watch

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    (Original post by Fleurie)
    so if you're thinking "i don't like this person, why are they being so nasty to me" or "i really want to go to the beach"... how do you think that? or especially at school for example when writing an essay in english or trying to understand something in chemistry that you can't quite understand and you are just figuring it out in your brain?
    This is hard to answer because I can't quite describe it. If I don't like someone it comes out in feelings. I can feel anger and dislike towards someone I don't like or hatred and anger towards someone I despise.

    When I'm trying to write an essay which I've been preparing for, I think the entire thing in images and translate the images into words which can be difficult. If I don't understand something in chemistry, etc, I mainly get these worrying images of failing tests, etc, etc. I tend to read my notes then I go to the teacher for help.
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    (Original post by raaachek)
    TheGoonerGirl, can I ask, before you experienced sound for the first time, did you feel that you were still living life to the full, because it was impossible for you to imagine any better?

    I always ask myself whenever I see a deaf or blind person, 'What sort of a life does this person have? It must be infuriating for them, being deprived of a sense that plays such a HUGE part in the lives of those of us with 5 senses!'

    But a friend of mine raised a hypothetical situation where some of us have a sixth sense - telepathy - and because telepathy is something they use all the time, these people ask themselves exactly what I ask myself about you guys in the deaf community: 'What sort of a life do these people without the sense of telepathy have? We use it all the time and it's the source of so much of our enjoyment!' I thought what my friend said was genius. What do you think?? Is it the same sort of thing, would you say??
    I couldn't really live life to the full because my deafness kinda restricted that. Before I got my hearing aids it was hard to imagine having clearer and louder hearing. When I could hear properly for the first time I was absolutely petrified of sound but it meant my deafness had less control over me.

    Yes, being deaf can be infuriating for me and can imagine that it is for others like me. It means mishearing people and struggling in school (the local council refused to fund a SEN for me to go to a special boarding school for deaf children). It has also shaped me into the person I am: shy, quiet, etc, etc.

    Deaf people can communicate in sign language, but not all. I know the basics of British Sign Language but I've probably forgotten most of it from not practising over the years.
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    I've wondered the same thing about animals, and babies. They have to think in some way. Most of it is probably instinctual.

    Thinking in your own language is actually the slowest form of doing something. Have you ever done sports where you have to think fast etc? You don't think, "I'm going to catch that ball", etc. Its all motor memory etc, and your brain just knows what to do. That form is the fastest.

    So I don't believe you have to think everything that way.
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    I couldn't really live life to the full because my deafness kinda restricted that. Before I got my hearing aids it was hard to imagine having clearer and louder hearing. When I could hear properly for the first time I was absolutely petrified of sound but it meant my deafness had less control over me.

    Yes, being deaf can be infuriating for me and can imagine that it is for others like me. It means mishearing people and struggling in school (the local council refused to fund a SEN for me to go to a special boarding school for deaf children). It has also shaped me into the person I am: shy, quiet, etc, etc.

    Deaf people can communicate in sign language, but not all. I know the basics of British Sign Language but I've probably forgotten most of it from not practising over the years.
    I'm really sorry to hear that. That really is unfair. I have a deaf friend and she's faced so many setbacks in her life, like you. It's embarrassing for her having to ask people to repeat themselves constantly (she lipreads), and when people ask her for directions and stuff in public, she has to recite a worn out speech about her being deaf and having trouble understanding people who talk fast. I won't even get started on her school life.

    She was profoundly deaf from 18 months old to 4, and until age 15 she could only hear in one ear (cochlear implant), but now she's got the bilateral and it gives her major headaches. There's a magnet in her head or something.

    I might be out of line saying this but... are there occasions where you're actually grateful for the deafness - perhaps because your neighbours are playing loud music and you can just switch off your hearing aid? When my neighbours are at it, I wish for the time being that I could be deaf.
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    (Original post by raaachek)
    I'm really sorry to hear that. That really is unfair. I have a deaf friend and she's faced so many setbacks in her life, like you. It's embarrassing for her having to ask people to repeat themselves constantly (she lipreads), and when people ask her for directions and stuff in public, she has to recite a worn out speech about her being deaf and having trouble understanding people who talk fast. I won't even get started on her school life.

    She was profoundly deaf from 18 months old to 4, and until age 15 she could only hear in one ear (cochlear implant), but now she's got the bilateral and it gives her major headaches. There's a magnet in her head or something.

    I might be out of line saying this but... are there occasions where you're actually grateful for the deafness - perhaps because your neighbours are playing loud music and you can just switch off your hearing aid? When my neighbours are at it, I wish for the time being that I could be deaf.
    No need to be sorry! Like your friend, it's also embarrassing for me to have to ask for people to repeat themselves when they're talking to me. It's even harder when the person isn't facing me as I have to lip-read too. My older cousin always thinks that I use my deafness as an excuse to not hear anything, which I find pretty rude and offensive! I also have trouble trying to understand people who talk fast.

    I got my first hearing-aids when I was about 9 or 10 but they're not the same as your friend's. Your friend has much worse hearing than me and requires more help to hear.

    Yes, there are times where I'm grateful to have my deafness. It means I can relax more and get to sleep more easily, as well as blocking out my noisy and rather disruptive neighbours. I simply switch off my hearing-aids and get on with stuff. It's not out of line at all for asking me that.
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    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    No need to be sorry! Like your friend, it's also embarrassing for me to have to ask for people to repeat themselves when they're talking to me. It's even harder when the person isn't facing me as I have to lip-read too. My older cousin always thinks that I use my deafness as an excuse to not hear anything, which I find pretty rude and offensive! I also have trouble trying to understand people who talk fast.

    I got my first hearing-aids when I was about 9 or 10 but they're not the same as your friend's. Your friend has much worse hearing than me and requires more help to hear.

    Yes, there are times where I'm grateful to have my deafness. It means I can relax more and get to sleep more easily, as well as blocking out my noisy and rather disruptive neighbours. I simply switch off my hearing-aids and get on with stuff. It's not out of line at all for asking me that.
    Do you not worry about burglars/poltergeists at night without your hearing aids on?
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    (Original post by raaachek)
    Do you not worry about burglars/poltergeists at night without your hearing aids on?
    That's a very good point. When I'm older and I leave home, I'll probably have to have a hearing dog which would help, guide and alert me.
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    (Original post by Jingers)
    So they think in words and images?
    Interesting question, also jJingers I was captivated by your sig snake and watched it all lol.
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    Interesting thread.
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    (Original post by AlexandrTheGreat)
    It occurred to me, what do blind people think about when they masturbate?
    guess thats a down side of being blind
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    (Original post by raaachek)
    Omg, you're blind??? How does your computer work?

    That's really interesting what you said. Thanks for your response, Fleurie.
    lol no i'm not blind! sorry did it come across like i was? i was talking about how snakes can see in infrared too!
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    (Original post by Fleurie)
    lol no i'm not blind! sorry did it come across like i was? i was talking about how snakes can see in infrared too!
    oh lol haha xD
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    (Original post by CheeseMunchies)
    Just all ways puzzled me. I guess there heads are silent and its visual.
    Maybe in pictures or like reading ( in the language the person can read/speak/understand)
 
 
 
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