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    I'm not sure yet I'd probably like to end up being a clinical psychologist or involved in counselling/addictions.
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    I want to eventually go into law with my psychology degree so I can fight cases in court using psychology. Sounds so good and I can't wait to explore the option even more


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    (Original post by SpottedZebra)
    I've always had an interest in studying medicine but i just don't think I could cope with the stress of all that competition!
    NOw that Im a psych grad really want to medicine however as I already did 2 years of medicine before and failed an exam and asked to withdraw there is no chance of my dream coming true
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    (Original post by skotch)
    Just graduated from a psychology degree. Most are pretty unsure of what they want to do in life.

    I would say about 15% are looking to go into medicine.
    About 10-20% want to go into teaching, either primary or secondary school.
    Quite a few are doing research masters or PhDs.
    Quite a few are doing masters or placements in order to go down the clinical psychology route or mental health nursing stuff.
    Couple of people are going into law.

    But loads of people have no idea what they want to do and are biding time and relaxing for a bit. I wouldn't worry what you want to do just yet. I only decided I wanted to go into medicine at Christmas time in my final year!

    Good luck with it all!
    Hi what brought you to the medicine conclusion I realy wana go that route but tried it before and been unsuccessful
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    (Original post by the_apprentice)
    Hi what brought you to the medicine conclusion I realy wana go that route but tried it before and been unsuccessful
    I just became a bit disillusioned with Psychology and the way that is essentially the empirical study of philosophy, and thus there are no set answers. We can propose all these different theories and paradigms, but at the end of the day there will always be other theories and proponents of them. With medicine things are a lot more objective (not completely, obviously) and I have always considered myself more interested in the biological side of things in psychology. Why I didn't do neuroscience rather than psychology I'll never know...

    Medicine also offers many other things that really appeal to me - constant interaction with new and interesting people, virtually guaranteed job security once qualified, the investigative nature of medicine, opportunity to travel with work, the huge variety of things you can do with the degree, constant learning throughout your career and it's a well-respected, well-paid and ultimately satisfying career choice (or so I believe!)
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    (Original post by skotch)
    I just became a bit disillusioned with Psychology and the way that is essentially the empirical study of philosophy, and thus there are no set answers. We can propose all these different theories and paradigms, but at the end of the day there will always be other theories and proponents of them. With medicine things are a lot more objective (not completely, obviously) and I have always considered myself more interested in the biological side of things in psychology. Why I didn't do neuroscience rather than psychology I'll never know ...
    My thoughts exactly. It's almost cute how Cognitive Psychology tries to find concept and auxiliary explanations when actually our whole thinking is just neurons firing action potentials and therefore Biopsychology and Neurosciences are way better at explaining that stuff. Half of my time I'm sitting there staring at shapes and having to deal with shape constancy and regression to the real when the other half, brain anatomy and physiology, neurons, axons, oligodentrocytes etc. is so much more interesting

    But think of Physics: what's that about string theory? People have been working on it for decades and still no ones knows whether they actually exist. Not even physics is 100% accurate and free of philosophical aspects

    Not to forget Psychology is a very young discipline. Physics and Chemistry have been properly investigated since the 17th century, Psychology just emerged as a scientific field in the late 19th century. Or as my tutor put it, "Basically we're still in the dark ages of Psychology."

    Medicine also offers many other things that really appeal to me - constant interaction with new and interesting people, virtually guaranteed job security once qualified, the investigative nature of medicine, opportunity to travel with work, the huge variety of things you can do with the degree, constant learning throughout your career and it's a well-respected, well-paid and ultimately satisfying career choice (or so I believe!)
    Just study medicine afterwards, that's what I'm going to do
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    My thoughts exactly. It's almost cute how Cognitive Psychology tries to find concept and auxiliary explanations when actually our whole thinking is just neurons firing action potentials and therefore Biopsychology and Neurosciences are way better at explaining that stuff. Half of my time I'm sitting there staring at shapes and having to deal with shape constancy and regression to the real when the other half, brain anatomy and physiology, neurons, axons, oligodentrocytes etc. is so much more interesting

    But think of Physics: what's that about string theory? People have been working on it for decades and still no ones knows whether they actually exist. Not even physics is 100% accurate and free of philosophical aspects

    Not to forget Psychology is a very young discipline. Physics and Chemistry have been properly investigated since the 17th century, Psychology just emerged as a scientific field in the late 19th century. Or as my tutor put it, "Basically we're still in the dark ages of Psychology."



    Just study medicine afterwards, that's what I'm going to do
    Surely by that logic then one could say (although you would have to be quite narrow minded to say it) that its cute that biological and medically sciences even bother when we all know that everything is explainable by basic physical forces and elementary particles.

    Either way, although i like biology, im not jealous that my biology friends at university mostly spend their time memorising facts which are almost universally recognised to be true (to a certain extent obs), whereas in psychology pretty much everything you learn is dodgy and questionable (which makes it interesting to learn).
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    Surely by that logic then one could say (although you would have to be quite narrow minded to say it) that its cute that biological and medically sciences even bother when we all know that everything is explainable by basic physical forces and elementary particles.
    Not really. Biological and Medical Sciences are employing the knowledge of these physical forces and elementary particles. Physics explains these forces and works with them, Chemistry is concerned about how these particles interact to form molecules etc., Biology and Medical Sciences investigate how these molecules are working in living beings and so on. Physics simply can't explain what Biology is investigating because it's not interested in that, it's a different field. Neuroscience and Cognitive Psych., on the other hand, partly work on the same questions.

    Cognitive Psych. employs methods of the natural sciences to some extent, but then again it proposes stuff like logogens or lexical access when everyone knows that there are no such things as logogens or an internal lexicon but it's all just neurons interacting by the means of biochemistry.
    But I guess I'm bashing Cognitive Psych. a bit too much, there's probably a valid reason for its existence
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Not really.1. Biological and Medical Sciences are employing the knowledge of these physical forces and elementary particles. Physics explains these forces and works with them, Chemistry is concerned about how these particles interact to form molecules etc., Biology and Medical Sciences investigate how these molecules are working in living beings and so on. 2.Physics simply can't explain what Biology is investigating because it's not interested in that, it's a different field. 3.Neuroscience and Cognitive Psych., on the other hand, partly work on the same questions.

    Cognitive Psych. employs methods of the natural sciences to some extent, but then again 4.it proposes stuff like logogens or lexical access when everyone knows that there are no such things as logogens or an internal lexicon but it's all just neurons interacting by the means of biochemistry.
    But I guess I'm bashing Cognitive Psych. a bit too much, there's probably a valid reason for its existence
    1. Summary: Biological, Medical and Chemical sciences are applied physics.
    2. Technically incorrect. See point 1. Physicists are not working on biology but biologists are using physics to work on biology.
    3. Do they? There is an overlap between neuroscience and cognitive psychology. Exactly, the same overlap that exists between bio/med/chem and physics. Up to a point, cognitive psychology is applied brain science in the same way that bio/med/chem is applied physics.
    As you can see, this overlap is so loose and hugely vast that thinking in terms of overlaps is not really useful. Instead we think of levels (either in information processing terms or in biological terms).
    4. The explanations are empirically supported explanations that make sense of stuff that we see it's going on. Example: we all know that "memory stores" do not exist. But the idea of memory stores is a pretty good explanation that explains how some memories are not transient. This can be empirically tested.

    Otherwise, "it proposes stuff like logogens or lexical access when everyone knows that there are no such things as logogens or an internal lexicon but it's all just neurons interacting by the means of biochemistry." becomes: "it proposes stuff like immune system/organs/organisms/molecules when everyone knows that there are no such things but it's all just lots of particles interacting by the means of physics."
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Not really. Biological and Medical Sciences are employing the knowledge of these physical forces and elementary particles. Physics explains these forces and works with them, Chemistry is concerned about how these particles interact to form molecules etc., Biology and Medical Sciences investigate how these molecules are working in living beings and so on. Physics simply can't explain what Biology is investigating because it's not interested in that, it's a different field. Neuroscience and Cognitive Psych., on the other hand, partly work on the same questions.

    Cognitive Psych. employs methods of the natural sciences to some extent, but then again it proposes stuff like logogens or lexical access when everyone knows that there are no such things as logogens or an internal lexicon but it's all just neurons interacting by the means of biochemistry.
    But I guess I'm bashing Cognitive Psych. a bit too much, there's probably a valid reason for its existence


    I don't really want to defend cognitive neuroscience. But how does chemistry and physics tell us about quesitons like what effect does parenting have on child development, or what is the effect of pornography on children? Knowledge of biochemistry isn't going to help for a lot of these things.
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    Study medicine.

    I'm studying Psychology at the University of Dundee (currently in my 2nd year, abroad in Australia) but after I'm done with my Bachelor I'm pretty much set on studying medicine back home in Germany. There's a national 'waiting quota' of 20% for people who didn't get the grades at school to get into medicine directly, so depending on how many people apply you wait for a number of years (currently 6) and then go right into medicine without any further application or interview or whatever. Most people spend the time doing professional training in nursing, as emergency medical assistants etc., as my grades at school were good but not good enough (you don't stand a chance in Germany if you didn't get final grades equivalent to A*A*A or higher) I decided to study another degree.
    can I ask how old you are? I feel a bit old to be starting with medicine im in my mid 20's that's whats putting me off
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    (Original post by the_apprentice)
    can I ask how old you are? I feel a bit old to be starting with medicine im in my mid 20's that's whats putting me off
    I'm 22. Left German secondary school (Gymnasium) when I was 19, which is normal for Germany, worked a year for the Red Cross in Ghana, worked a year to earn some money for my studies, then started university in Scotland and am now in my 2nd year. When (if) I'm going to study medicine through the waiting quota I will be between 26 and 27 which might be fairly old, but in Germany 20% of all med students get in via this quota so every fifth person is at least as old as you

    The usual drawbacks are a fear of not fitting in and a financial loss through studying for a long time. However, a friend of mine started dentistry at 26 and fitted in perfectly fine, found friends etc. Furthermore, being a doctor doesn't turn you into a millionaire at once but you earn pretty decent money, over your lifetime it's probably more than with a random other degree. So the drawbacks really aren't that grave or even non existent.

    And life is just too short to not follow your passion
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    (Original post by the_apprentice)
    can I ask how old you are? I feel a bit old to be starting with medicine im in my mid 20's that's whats putting me off
    I wouldn't worry too much; the average age on my course is mid 20's and we have something whose 38 (and quite a few over 30).
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    (Original post by Sir Fox)
    I'm 22. Left German secondary school (Gymnasium) when I was 19, which is normal for Germany, worked a year for the Red Cross in Ghana, worked a year to earn some money for my studies, then started university in Scotland and am now in my 2nd year. When (if) I'm going to study medicine through the waiting quota I will be between 26 and 27 which might be fairly old, but in Germany 20% of all med students get in via this quota so every fifth person is at least as old as you

    The usual drawbacks are a fear of not fitting in and a financial loss through studying for a long time. However, a friend of mine started dentistry at 26 and fitted in perfectly fine, found friends etc. Furthermore, being a doctor doesn't turn you into a millionaire at once but you earn pretty decent money, over your lifetime it's probably more than with a random other degree. So the drawbacks really aren't that grave or even non existent.

    And life is just too short to not follow your passion
    I like it when people take breaks rather than going straight to university.
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    At the moment I'm planning on postgraduate study where I can hopefully get some work experience along the way too.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    PhD in social or experimental psych. Then plan to be a lecturer
    I like your answer,not sure why just yet but I do:-)
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    Ahhh....well I first had my heart and mind set on becoming a counselor of the humanistic vibe but my lovely tutor during my Access said. 'The choice is of course yours but I see you more studying Psychology as it is more academic based which is where you excell,also...well...you are still evolving'.
    To be fair we continually evolve until we breathe our last breath but I understand the point my tutor was making.
    During counselling skills afternoon's I often panicked as being in the role of counsellor often felt stilted somehow,yet in the role as client I felt right at home:-)
    So Psychology became my area of interest and in particular Forensic.
    In the long term I will be working with families in distress within my own practice,however to get me started I want to work with young offenders in a secure unit,prison.
    The female Carl Jung if you like,continually evolving and all:-)
    I love this thread,it just feels so good to contribute to a thread where though we all have different areas within Psychology that interest us,the common theme is Psychology.
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    Me again,there are some elements of Psychology as a whole that I do not agree with.
    A lot of world famous tests/research conducted is focused generally on a small percentage of society and then applied as possible fact for the rest of the world whose 'social norms' may be very different,that said the likes of Stanley Milgram hit the nail on the head when he carried out his obedience test.
    No school of thought is perfect1
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    Either clinical neuropsychology or straight clinical, undecided right now.

    The good thing about going into clinical neuropsychology is that you can either do a doctorate in Clinical or Educational psychology. As Clinical is so competitive that's a plus!


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    Educational psychology is also very competitive
 
 
 
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