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    This was at my work, a little village pub.

    "Did your parents divorce when you were young?"

    "...Yes, why?"

    "Oh, people from broken homes have the loveliest smiles."

    I wasn't too sure how to react to that :L
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    I think I must look approchable or knowledgable since I always get picked out to be the person people ask questions.

    Last week I had two people ask me if the train we were on was going to their destination despite there being actual staff on the train.
    The day before I'd had someone ask for Loughborough Uni's 'main reception' because they'd missed the open days and just turned up to have a look around. I probably get asked for directions around campus on a fortnightly basis, though our campus maps are pretty confusing.
    I've also had someone ask me if there were any more Greggs in Loughborough because the two they'd been to didn't sell the same bread that a store elsewhere in the country does.

    Odd thing is I'd personally be far too shy to ask random people for help, unless it was pretty much a life or death situation.
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    Stranger: where is the nearest stripper club?

    ME: * silence*
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    People need to say 'hi' more often to each other
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    I was walking along once on quite a nice Summers day when from around 50 feet away a shirtless man who looked like a junkie started to hail me; "Excuse me, excuse me, excuse me, excuse me" as I walked closer.

    Assessing the situation, and deciding that I was by no means ready for a stabbing I ignored the fellow, who continued saying "Excuse me" until I was a couple of feet past him. He then began shouting '********' at me, at around the same frequency.

    In many ways it could have been a beautiful friendship. I actually hate all strangers talking to me in the street, if we see each other around then we can begin a relationship, starting off with a brief incline of the head and moving on to an 'Alright'. This may eventually progress to brief chats. I IN NO WAY want to talk to the assorted shower of *******s present on public transport, in the streets and especially not in the pub. Although I did learn one thing from a well refreshed lady in a pub once; 'Fat disnae wrinkle' was apparently the reason for her youthful appearance.
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    (Original post by Jam198)
    What I mean is, you're minding your own business or whatever and then some stranger makes a comment for whatever reason.

    So I had some woman tell me 'to watch the road or you'll get run over', because I was looking at a dog, lol.

    I actually don't appreciate things said to me by strangers even if it is for my own good.

    Another example was this man asked me why my bag was so big? I was thinking mind your own f****%%g business. But I didn't say it out loud because he was big. What are these people on.

    I'd like to think of myself as normal and I just wouldn't say stuff to random people like this unless I needed directions or something like that.
    Your reply: Why are you so big?
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    Strangers often talk to me - as long as they seem nice, I don't mind at all!

    The only time I don't like it is when people act creepily and get way too close to you. The other week I was in the bus station. There's a Costa in the corner, I was sat next to the railings which separate it from the "waiting area" of the station. Both the coffee shop and waiting area were completely empty - I was the only one there. Then this random middle-aged man sits RIGHT NEXT to me on the other side, rests his chin on the railings (so that his eyes are right in-level with my chest), grins and starts asking me where I live, what I'm reading... :erm: To say I felt uncomfortable is a massive understatement...

    But MOST of the time, people are friendly and just want to chat, and I'm more than happy with that!
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    I don't mind when they say nice things or ask me questions about something, but when a group of chavs shout

    GAAAAAAAAAYBOYYYYYYY

    at you in a busy place it is quite embarrassing and mortifying, so please don't do that to anybody
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    When I was in year 7 I was walking to school (private; all-girls) and a boy from the local catholic school came up to me and called me a posh *****. I've never been able to understand quite what the point in it was as I was simply minding my own business :sigh:

    Although, I often speak to friendly strangers on long train journeys. Most recently coming back from the London olympics a guy sitting opposite my mum and I was talking to us about Beth Tweddle because he was the head professor at the university she goes to. He even told us that she was going to be on dancing on ice months before it was announced
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    Keeping in mind I have never met this women in my life.

    *Starts tugging a bit of my hair* "Do you wear extensions?" *continues tugging some of my hair"

    :dots: Ahem.

    No I don't and I'd appreciate it if you simply asked me instead of feeling up my hair.
    Why do people seem to assume that long hair = fake hair? :eyeball:
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    Reading through the comments. It's not the saying 'Hi' that is offensive, although (I do find that strange), it's not this that is really the problem. I'm saying this to non-brits who don't understand.

    It's the fact that these strangers say 'weird' things that are intrusive and nosey. Things that are none of their business. Everyday life in the UK, people don't talk to each other like we know each other, so we 're not used to it, and when you hear so much about con-men and whatnot on the news, no wonder we're wary. In America, you guys are alway fake nice to one another, it's normal there, everywhere is different. It's nothing to do with 'get over yourself', it's just unusual here; all relative.

    There was an east european guy in the news who put a hanky over people's iphones in coffee shops, pretending to be all friendly and then swiped their phones. But you can usually tell who is genuine, well you would think so.
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    (Original post by Forget that)
    Your reply: Why are you so big?
    I wish I was good at come backs, but I'd probably have to get ready to dash off
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    I think there's only a few British social interactions between strangers that are acceptable:
    - dog walks, with fellow dog owners who you gradually get to know after seeing them everyday.
    - long train journeys

    .. That's it, sorry.

    Once this drunk man on the bus started trying to talk football with me, with which I decided to just go " yeah. yeah." and he then proceeded to ask me where I was getting off.
    I got off when we were on a moon made of cheese. Obviously.
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    I got asked by a junkie if I had a lighter or money I could tap him? But that is all really haha, you do get the occasional wee old woman who talks to you though, that's cute.
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    (Original post by PINKFLEUR)
    Keeping in mind I have never met this women in my life.

    *Starts tugging a bit of my hair* "Do you wear extensions?" *continues tugging some of my hair"

    :dots: Ahem.

    No I don't and I'd appreciate it if you simply asked me instead of feeling up my hair.
    Why do people seem to assume that long hair = fake hair? :eyeball:
    Ha, strangers touching your hair is odd.

    You just end up with a :eek: expression. That's pretty much all you can do while you think about how crazy they are.
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    Nothing too crazy, been asked a couple of times for money by homeless people and once when I gave the guy what he asked for, he said 'is that it?' In a ungrateful tone and walked off. Now whenever I see him and I always do up town, I make sure not to give him anything and all because of his lack of damn gratitude. I feel bad for homeless people but they can still show some appreciation when someone helps them out, I mean most of the time their living situation was brought on by them so it's a bit rich to go demanding all sorts.
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    (Original post by Reform)
    Ha, strangers touching your hair is odd.

    You just end up with a :eek: expression. That's pretty much all you can do while you think about how crazy they are.
    It happened on a cramped bus where you could practically feel people breathing down your neck and armpits were in people's faces (mine included) because everyone was desperate to keep out of the cold and rain - in May!

    She was speaking really loudly so people would turn around to find me just standing there awkwardly with some strands of my hair still in her hand. :huff:
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    Stranger once pat me on the back and obvs I turned around and they go "I'm a robot and you are my friend. Nice to meet you child" then they ran away...


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    Oh and a police man once told me my face paint looked good (I was like 5)


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    I seem to attract old people and little kids no end, I reckon its the hair.
    I got told I look like brave today, last week this girl came up and started bouncing her hand on my hair. Also, on Monday this old woman came up to me and complimented the pen I was holding, I can assure you a thrilling conversation ensued

    I dont mind chatting to people, but I can't imagine initiating it

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