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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    They didn't have to do those 5 years. A huge problem with the education system is that everything is so rushed. A person between the ages of 16-21 is going to change their opinions and aspirations A LOT and you're told it's good to have a degree, if that degree is in anything, and most of the time your feelings are pushed aside just so long the school gets their results. I think people born in other generations had the benefit that they could work their way up, there isn't the widespread option to do that anymore.
    They didn't have to, no, but they were definitely advised/pushed/encouraged by everyone they were supposed to look up to, from their parents to the government.
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    Why do you make exceptions just because it's 'less academically demanding degree' when they were told the same things as a child?
    Because no one is told that if you get a degree in some "fun" subject, you'll instantly get a great job in the field. If you do a degree like that, you should expect to find it difficult to get work.
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    (Original post by punani)
    Sure some of these people are extremely naive and deluded, but the real scandal is what made them this way?
    Oh boy. They're not ready to hear the answer to that one. What is education and how/why does it work? They would probably want to murder whoever told them the unvarnished truth. Did you know that at many universities students are still campaigning for the abolition of tuition fees? The education and so-called 'research' sector is dominated by socialist academics exploiting the naivete and foolishness of young people borrowing themselves into oblivion. It's a gravy train. When it stops moving and the bull**** about the value of arts and social science 'research' isn't believed, it won't exactly be comfortable for those who are currently invested in it as a 'career'.
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    (Original post by ChocoCoatedLemons)
    Because no one is told that if you get a degree in some "fun" subject, you'll instantly get a great job in the field. If you do a degree like that, you should expect to find it difficult to get work.
    Some students don't receive very good advice
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    (Original post by Hopple)
    They didn't have to, no, but they were definitely advised/pushed/encouraged by everyone they were supposed to look up to, from their parents to the government.
    Anyone who looks up to the government is asking for trouble
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    (Original post by Picaa)
    Oh boy. They're not ready to hear the answer to that one. What is education and how/why does it work? They would probably want to murder whoever told them the unvarnished truth. Did you know that at many universities students are still campaigning for the abolition of tuition fees? The education and so-called 'research' sector is dominated by socialist academics exploiting the naivete and foolishness of young people borrowing themselves into oblivion. It's a gravy train. When it stops moving and the bull**** about the value of arts and social science 'research' isn't believed, it won't exactly be comfortable for those who are currently invested in it as a 'career'.
    My plan is to start up my own business and move abroad so I won't have to pay back my student loans.

    Thousands of EU students do this to us every year and if you can't beat 'em....................
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    Photographers are useless, I can take cool pic with my phone with 0 training whatsoever.

    And oh, such people must grow up and realise that in the real world nobody gives a **** about them or their qualifications and if they are not good enough then stacking shelves is what they are going to do.
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    They didn't have to do those 5 years. A huge problem with the education system is that everything is so rushed. A person between the ages of 16-21 is going to change their opinions and aspirations A LOT and you're told it's good to have a degree, if that degree is in anything, and most of the time your feelings are pushed aside just so long the school gets their results. I think people born in other generations had the benefit that they could work their way up, there isn't the widespread option to do that anymore.
    You may have a point there. On one of the other threads somebody was talking about whether or not we should be like Germany. Another comparison is Norway. Sweden gets used as well as a comparison.


    All of those countries have (although Germany recently dropped it) compulsory military service/voluntary work at 18. Gives people an 18 to 24 month breather before they start into higher education about whether higher education is for them or not..

    Just a thought
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    There may even be jobs for an average, moderately untalented photography graduate. For example graduate programs with supermarkets, McDonalds or whatever. But he has to show the right work skills, enthusiasm and professionalism, and the brutal reality is that his degree hasn't equipped him with any of those qualities. It hasn't even given him a proper academic grounding. But while he was doing it, he appeared to have a function in society, i.e. he was a 'university student'.

    If you had told him his degree was useless while he was doing it, he would have felt bad first, then angry. He would have lashed out at whoever told him the truth. In other words, he was part of the problem himself. He was a part of the universities propaganda system. His participation in that system wasn't on the basis of politics or his pathetic defenses of the indefensible anonymously on internet forums. It was on the basis of the funding he brought to the university as a customer.

    Note the underlined words I used above. You want proof of this? Find out why I have no much neg rep on this forum. In many cases, neg rep of the inexperienced and of fools and ideologues is worth much more than positive rep in forums like this one. I have many times introduced little nuggets of basic real-world truths on the SOAS subforum especially. Check my past posts, see if you agree or disagree, and note the reactions.

    Some people want to be conned. Others want to con them. That's why we have the consumer product of mass access to 'higher education'. And religion.
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    (Original post by MatureStudent36)
    You may have a point there. On one of the other threads somebody was talking about whether or not we should be like Germany. Another comparison is Norway. Sweden gets used as well as a comparison.


    All of those countries have (although Germany recently dropped it) compulsory military service/voluntary work at 18. Gives people an 18 to 24 month breather before they start into higher education about whether higher education is for them or not..

    Just a thought
    I saw the posts about Germany, I hear good things about the country mainly. But compulsory military service I have a problem with because some students may know what they want and the state is dictating to them what they need. The option should be available and I agree it could help them get a sense of direction, but I wouldn't be happy about it pushed on me!

    I'm thinking more of encouraging individuality (which doesn't happen that much, people say be yourself etc, but it doesn't work when schools push you to get their grade averages), opening apprenticeships, not being so reliant on the service sector and not drilling into people's minds that if you don't academically succeed you're a failure.
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    (Original post by c_al)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/23686814

    This kind of thing annoys me personally, as some people seem to think getting a degree should automatically give them an amazing job and they will therefore reject any job that they do not deem worthy of themselves.

    I also find it hilariously ironic that one of the people in the article has just completed a degree in photography and yet is moaning about wasted talent.
    omg and he's a ****ing photography graduate too. Not like he did physics, or maths or something hard! What an obnoxious, dumb little ****! I'd happily do shelf stacking, but asda rejected me!
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    (Original post by CEKTOP)
    Photographers are useless, I can take cool pic with my phone with 0 training whatsoever.

    And oh, such people must grow up and realise that in the real world nobody gives a **** about them or their qualifications and if they are not good enough then stacking shelves is what they are going to do.
    There is still demand for professional photography though (special occasions, passports).
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    Almost anyone has the ability to earn a degree, and many do believe they have earned themselves a place in a high pay job within that profession. Complaining about stacking shelves is like complaining about having no money. In this day and age a job is hard to come by and even a tenner is hard earned cash. You can't put the blame on society for your lack of experience and laziness. A degree in the arts is very competitive and requires you to be the best at your craft, you can't just expect opportunities to come knocking at your door.
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    But the fact still remains that he has borrowed thousands in taxpayer's money and he isn't paying any of it back on minimum wage. What a wasted investment.
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    The biggest problem is that only 1 in 4 jobs requires a degree, yet numerous governments have been obsessed with getting half of school leavers into higher education.

    This means there is extreme levels of competition for the best jobs and with the massive increase in immigration, cheap labour has driven down the wages of almost every other skilled and semi-skilled career.

    Unless you have skills that are actually in demand then it will be very tough for you.
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    While I agree that no one is too good to stack shelves, especially someone at the start of their career, at the end of the day, university graduates taking low skill minimum wage jobs just takes those jobs away from people not capable of doing more skilled work, so they are the ones claiming benefits instead, ergo, nothing is really solved.

    On another note, I graduated two years ago, everyone I know that did more a more vocational degree, such as Public Relations, Events Management and Graphic Design has found relevant work, where as a lot of those who did degrees like History and English Lit are really struggling, just some food for thought for those slating "non traditional" degrees.
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    It's ok to have a low paid job before/whilst at University but sorry, I haven't studied GCSE's for the best part of three years, A-levels for two and potentially 4-5 years at University just to end up in the same job as somebody who didn't even consider all of the above!
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    (Original post by g_star_raw_1989)
    Stacking shelves is actually not that bad. It is your attitude towards stacking shelves that will screw you up more than anything; in terms of thinking that it is a useless task that won't get you anywhere in life.

    Sales or Customer Development positions at companies at like Proctor & Gamble/Unilever actually involve to some extent going into supermarkets and deciding where your products will be placed, how they will be stocked on the shelves and creating displays for them. Admittedly, that is not all they do but there is an element of it.

    These are graduate level jobs with 30k starting salaries.
    What's your point? You've described a tiny similarity between two vastly different jobs and then left it at that.
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    Some students don't receive very good advice
    That's life for you. It's a tough old world.
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    There is still demand for professional photography though (special occasions, passports).
    Yeah, I can agree with that, but the supply far exceeds the demand. This is the thing few of those who choose a degree in photography understand.
 
 
 
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