Dropped Out of University Watch

Limpopo
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#81
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Havent read all the comments but common themes seem to be be drop outs because of..

Hard work
boredom

Nothing worthwhile comes easy and it seems to me that when selecting a degree course, one must have an eye on employment prospects and earning potential when you come out the other end of the machine.

There is no point in having a degree in something you find teribly interesting but which has limited appeal to employers.

Life doesnt get any easier as you get older.

I dont have the luxury of a degree but i have never had a days unemployment since leaving school more than 30 years ago and i still have my foot on the pedal right up to to day.

The end result is plenty enough money to do what i like and also good retirement income.
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Where'sPerry?
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(Original post by Limpopo)
Havent read all the comments but common themes seem to be be drop outs because of..

Hard work
boredom

Nothing worthwhile comes easy and it seems to me that when selecting a degree course, one must have an eye on employment prospects and earning potential when you come out the other end of the machine.

There is no point in having a degree in something you find teribly interesting but which has limited appeal to employers.

Life doesnt get any easier as you get older.

I dont have the luxury of a degree but i have never had a days unemployment since leaving school more than 30 years ago and i still have my foot on the pedal right up to to day.

The end result is plenty enough money to do what i like and also good retirement income.
To be honest I think the most common theme here actually seems to be depression. It was definitely the case for me as well, I literally cried for hours every day that I was at uni. I was homesick, not enjoying my course (it had fairly poor job prospects so there was no point sticking it out for money) and hating halls. I have never ever been so low and I'm still not sure if I have 100% recovered yet. I dropped out four months ago.

I'm really surprised that you're such a firm advocate of uni, bearing in mind that you have done well without a degree! After leaving I am way, way more supportive of the employment and apprenticeships route and I personally believe we need to stop encouraging almost every school leaver in the UK to go to uni. Pretty much every day on TSR I see posts along the lines of "I'm a graduate and I can't get a job" and it's awful to see so many in this situation when they seem to have almost been promised that having a degree will make their desired career a reality - it won't.
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Limpopo
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(Original post by Where'sPerry?)
To be honest I think the most common theme here actually seems to be depression. It was definitely the case for me as well, I literally cried for hours every day that I was at uni. I was homesick, not enjoying my course (it had fairly poor job prospects so there was no point sticking it out for money) and hating halls. I have never ever been so low and I'm still not sure if I have 100% recovered yet. I dropped out four months ago.

I'm really surprised that you're such a firm advocate of uni, bearing in mind that you have done well without a degree! After leaving I am way, way more supportive of the employment and apprenticeships route and I personally believe we need to stop encouraging almost every school leaver in the UK to go to uni. Pretty much every day on TSR I see posts along the lines of "I'm a graduate and I can't get a job" and it's awful to see so many in this situation when they seem to have almost been promised that having a degree will make their desired career a reality - it won't.
Thanks for your input Perry...

Yes i can see that psychologically, going to Uni could have its challenges. It must be quite a big leap for many. From the relatively cocooned environment of the home straight into the big wide world where you have to do almost everything for yourself,learn to live independently, try to fit in socially,make new friends and oh by the way get into study mode with all the pressures it entails.

I guess there is an expectation and received wisdom that you go off to Uni,make lots of friends, go out on the lash almost every other night and its all a breeze and one big social whirl.

I'm sure its not like that for many young people.

I guess its better if you are from nuclear family in the Shires who are reasonably well wadded and you are as a result,buffered in your new world but again, for many its not like that.

When I left school the world was very different. At that time the people who went into sixth form college/class and then onto Uni were seen as the elite.

Most people left school and got a job and boy, there were so many opportunities that Employers courted YOU and YOU did the picking.

You could easily open the local paper a few months before the traditional school leaving date of August and find pages of companies looking to take on Apprentices, to invest in people and give them high quality training.

What changed?

A lot of things I guess but i think a big driver was the switch from the UK being a big R&D/Developmental and manufacturing base to a service and finance economy.

Look where we are now. HM Government has to kow tow to the City of London and court them for if they pull the plug and move to Hong Kong then UK PLC would be stuffed.

I do think many Uni students would benefit greatly from better support networks. Maybe mentoring contacts ?

I wonder if there is a growing tide of resentment amongst Uni students with regard to the declining availability of places and also the lack of flow into employment which was once seen as almost a right of passage due to having a degree?

Is the move to an Apprenticeship still scorned and seen as a much less attractive option? More blue collar than white?
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Brian Butterfield
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apprenticeships better than uni? please... uni is so much more than getting a piece of paper which says you're above average in subject x.

depression is crap but you do get over it eventually, and when you do, life is good again
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addylad
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(Original post by Brian Butterfield)
apprenticeships better than uni? please... uni is so much more than getting a piece of paper which says you're above average in subject x.

depression is crap but you do get over it eventually, and when you do, life is good again
Who even are you?

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Anz
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(Original post by Naami)
*Sigh* I'm currently doing chemistry - in my first term of first year and I honestly don't feel cut out for it. I keep thinking I'm going to fail and the workload is intense - I feel all I ever do is post labs and tutorials, I never have time to even go over lectures/extra work nvm societies! I don't want to drop out, and I'm gonna see how the rest of the year goes, but it is a bit demotivating that one of my course mates dropped out last week (and she was actually very smart!)
Hey there. Are you still at university? I hope it's getting better for you. And I shouldve made a post when I was struggling during my first semester, worse than anyone I knew. It's got better for me now but I'm still thinking of leaving at the end of the year, Pharmacy is difffficcculttt.
And I know what you mean- I know 3 friends who have dropped out, but think of it as you being a survivor! and fight! you can do it.

People need to remember that, despite so many older people telling you if you don't get a degree you'll be unemployed and broke, what's the most important thing? It's your happiness

Do. Whatever. Makes. You. Happy.

and remember there are people living on less than £5 a day somewhere out there

you'll be fine
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katesx
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I'm thinking of dropping out, what happened with your student finance? Did you have to pay it all back straight away? and did that include grants?
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wilson_2k4
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(Original post by Brian Butterfield)
apprenticeships better than uni? please... uni is so much more than getting a piece of paper which says you're above average in subject x.

depression is crap but you do get over it eventually, and when you do, life is good again
I find this a horrendously funny quote because you could very well say this about certain degrees in some manner these days...

And you can say that about anything to do with depression, that isn't limited to University. Not everyone deals with it in the same way and some won't get over it during their time at Uni, even if they stay the whole 3-5 years.
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wilson_2k4
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(Original post by Anz)
Hey there. Are you still at university? I hope it's getting better for you. And I shouldve made a post when I was struggling during my first semester, worse than anyone I knew. It's got better for me now but I'm still thinking of leaving at the end of the year, Pharmacy is difffficcculttt.
And I know what you mean- I know 3 friends who have dropped out, but think of it as you being a survivor! and fight! you can do it.

People need to remember that, despite so many older people telling you if you don't get a degree you'll be unemployed and broke, what's the most important thing? It's your happiness

Do. Whatever. Makes. You. Happy.

and remember there are people living on less than £5 a day somewhere out there

you'll be fine
This.

It's difficult. I found the jump between GCSEs to A-Levels difficult enough to have to re-sit a year, I had no idea what was in store when I went to University.

The only modules I did any good in in my first year were Maths related and that's because I'd done the same Maths for the three years prior to joining so I was effectively studying the same thing again.

Yeah, it was bad but I think if you're happy enough to stay and it's just you aren't quite getting the grades yet... give it another chance. Hell, even if you finish will all Ds, passing the first year is difficult. It's a whole new level of education alongside everything else that goes with University.

As for drop-outs, try not to let them worry you. Everyone drops out for their own reasons, they aren't things that you should extend to yourself from them unless you felt it to begin with. The drop-out/course-changing rate in first year is huge and it's pretty standard across most courses that this is the case.

But like Anz said, do what makes YOU happy. Try not to let others' experiences bug you. You're your own person at the end of the day. If you've gotta leave, you've gotta leave, there's no shame in it, it is in fact a very difficult decision to make sometimes. Either way, you make a big decision whether you stay or go and you should be proud whichever decision you make.
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Limpopo
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(Original post by Brian Butterfield)
apprenticeships better than uni? please... uni is so much more than getting a piece of paper which says you're above average in subject x.

depression is crap but you do get over it eventually, and when you do, life is good again
High quality Apprenticeships can indeed be a better option for some people.

Im not talking about the current crop of low grade workplace training thats being rebadged as apprenticeships eg apprentice barrisata at costa coffee,im talking about 3 year structured training and development within an established business.

Be careful. HM Government are currently trying to tout low grade training by rebadging it as apprenticeships. This is as bad as low grade degree courses which lead to nowhere.

The only important thing is to learn something useful,something that is marketable in the workplace and from which you can earn a long term living and develop/progress.
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i-love-coffee
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(Original post by Nfergs)
This week I made the decision of dropping out of university. For those who have also dropped out of university, what did you do afterwards and do you regret your decision?
Got a job in Paris for a year, improved my French to fluency, re-applied to study outside the UK for the coming September and will be starting a business degree at a top university. Do not regret my decision at all.
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xlizx
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I dropped out in 2011, I had picked the wrong degree, and the longer I stayed the more apparent it become, I also hated living in halls and being so far from home. I worked while I decided what I really wanted to do with my life, I realised what it was I wanted to do, got some work experience in that area, and am starting university again in September at a university I am much happier with, and a degree that I am far more passionate about.

It was the best decision I ever made, it was difficult at the time feeling like I'd failed and let people down, but it was defiantly the right decision.
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FelicityMarie
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I originally started a degree in Building Surveying at Liverpool John Moores Uni in 2009, but quit after two months because the actual work was too difficult for me. I then had to pay LJMU £550 out of my own pocket in 11 monthly repayments I thought I'd be able to handle it but it was way too complicated for me, especially the Mathematics part.

Now I'm starting Uni again in September doing a degree in Counselling, Coaching and Mentoring and I'm hoping that this is MUCH more up my street.

I do regret not staying on though, I could've been earning a top wage by now
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wartortle
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(Original post by thursdayschild)
I'm so glad I found this thread and people in the same situation! I'm currently at uni in my first year, and hating it. I don't like the course, the tutors or the people, due to a mess up on the universities part, I'm in accommodation far away from the university. I'm in a massive city (London, over 5 hours on the train from home) and have had the worst few months that have really affected my mental and physical health and my coursework has been terrible, not like me at all, so I think I'm going to withdraw this week, and apply for another uni to start again in September! My family are keen for me to do it because I'm so unhappy but I guess I'm just kinda worried about going home and having to tell everyone that I dropped out and also being a year older than everyone when I start again.
I was at my dream uni, a top business school, but I hated the city, I was to far away from family.
I dropped out, and have a place a my local uni which is also good. But the second I dropped out I felt happy again.
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username418231
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(Original post by Add!ction)
Took me a while to sort student finance but I believe they're just letting me keep the first instalment, so I'll just keep it by for next year.

I think people underestimate how big a step going to uni is. You have to be 100% happy with the decisions you make, as long as you have no regrets then all is good.
This. I always believed it was a massive decision for one to make, hence why I took my time with my decisions and did a lot of research. Then again, I had known for a long time that I wanted (and might need) to go to university.

I think a lot of people are pushed to much to go to any university and just do any course as long as it is a course you love. I remember being constantly pushed into going to any university with places to fill, despite having poor grades. I tried Clearing, and that didn't work out. Yet I was expected to try again yet when I tried to get support from they school (about taking a year out/retaking the year) they completely ignored me and refused to help me. Luckily the deputy head of sixth form, and the careers adviser all gave me great advice on what to do and alternatives to university. Eventually I withdrew my application and reapplied during my gap year.

I managed to pick the right course, at the right university (having done a foundation year at the same university) and I feel as though I made the right decision. I'm glad I didn't settle for any uni doing a random course I hadn't researched.

I think people shouldn't rush into university - if you are unsure then take a year out and figure out what you want to do. It's wrong for teachers and the government to push people into making massive decisions at the age of 18.
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Failure
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Gosh. I'm thinking about dropping out too. I feel like I'm probably a bit late to say that though with most people now talking about it from different perspectives!
I'm doing chemistry and am in the first year but I'm not really enjoying it or doing well at all. I think I might need some time to mature a bit more and also to learn how not to start four consecutive sentences with I. Like someone else's said, all of you who feel the same way coming out and saying that is very comforting. It can be quite lonely having this feeling when everyone else seems to be having so much fun! So thanks everyone for the advice and for sharing what really is quite a personal experience.
I think from here I need to ask a few people some things to determine if I can leave without messing up the housing for next year. Then see how it goes I think. Sorry if maybe I've been a bit too open here. I think I needed to type this out to get the ball rolling for me.

Also, katesx, I found this thread about loans and things that I found quite helpful.
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Linelli
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Don't regret dropping out at all i started an english literature and history course, it sucked all the fun out of things i enjoyed. i didn't like the uni, i didn't like the organisation of the course so i left. i ended up working in a paintballing centre for 9 months until i came across a job as a healthcare assistant on a medical ward. after working there for a year i decided i was going to give uni another go and here i am now studying towards becoming a registered mental health nurse; aiming to go into the area of substance misuse, and i am loving every single second of it the best decision i ever made.
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nmr1991
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I've now made the decision of leaving university having failed one year of a course that was right up my alley, but ended up being a waste of time, I should have got a diagnosis of depression and anxiety but it was too late into the year and I chose a different course that I thought would benefit me. This year I started computer science more or less which just like the previous course was unexpectedly challenging, but it wasn't the workload that alot of people would question, but it was the way it was being taught and the way I had to demonstrate my understanding of the subject.

I have depression some of the time, but only when I think there is nothing I can do anymore like right now when I have no chance of passing any of the units so really I won't make it to second year anyway. I was advised to take a retake year but that would mean I would have to face the same difficulties I had this year i.e. forming a group, communicating with others, making friends and that sort of thing which I was really bad at and it just made my confidence drop. So I won't be taking a retake year like so many i've taken in the past. All my peers have already graduated, at least the ones who weren't retaking anything.

I will be finishing off this year just to see how far I get, but I will just be delaying the inevitable, I will need a job to get my overdraft back onto an acceptable balance which will be difficult so I might have to get JSA, but it won't be as much as a job.

I think the alternative would be to either look really hard for a job or find an apprenticeship to occupy my time and get good experience from it. I can't really look right now since i'm still at university, but when I leave, that is the first thing I will do, I can't shy away from any of these things anymore.

On another note, my family thinks i'm doing very well, what a shock to their system it will be when they find out I will drop out once I finish.
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jonathanemptage
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(Original post by Nfergs)
I started my first semester of first year in September and only managed to last until November. I was studying French/Spanish with German as my elective at Heriot-Watt University.

One reason why I dropped out was because of the workload, I was constantly stressed and had no social life whatsoever. Because I lived at home all I ever did was go to university everyday, go to classes, do homework during breaks and then come back home to do more homework. I had so much homework that I never had the time to do any self-study which piled up and got ignored. It felt like no matter how much work I did, I was making no progress at all. Not living in halls made me feel like I was missing out on all of the 'fun' aspects of university. There wasn't really anything I actually enjoyed during the whole two months I was there. I was constantly miserable and I eventually had enough.

I'm not saying this to put anyone off, I know people that have had the complete opposite experience!
I would say one of the mistakes you made was commuting from home may I ask how long your journey was each day?

I dropped out in my first year too I reapplied to a different uni on a different course. The nice thing about uni is that you can always go back or even go somewhere new if you want to I would say if you do go back make sure it's something you like and also live in halls it's a much better experience

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Nfergs
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#100
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(Original post by jonathanemptage)
I would say one of the mistakes you made was commuting from home may I ask how long your journey was each day?

I dropped out in my first year too I reapplied to a different uni on a different course. The nice thing about uni is that you can always go back or even go somewhere new if you want to I would say if you do go back make sure it's something you like and also live in halls it's a much better experience
In the morning the journey could vary from 20 minutes to 45 minutes whereas it would take much longer to get home because of traffic.

I can assure anyone that I won't be going back to uni as I hated it from day one. The commuting didn't bother me too much and I felt staying in halls was a waste of money as I already lived in the same city and had everything I needed at home.
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