Turn on thread page Beta
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Jam')
    I don't think it should be a fee but a deposit of say £5. You'll only end up out of pocket if you miss your appointment.
    I've not heard that idea before but I think it's a good one! I can't see many downsides to it.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Pittawithcheese)
    I would cut the following:

    Gastric bypass surgery;
    Cosmetic surgery (as distinct from plastic surgery);
    Breastfeeding support workers (because the evidence shows they don't work);
    Methadone prescriptions after a certain period of time has elapsed;



    I would also introduce nominal charges for:

    Dressings and other consumables;
    Prescriptions upon discharge;
    Insulin (cumulatively the most expensive prescription medicine in the whole NHS).
    The flu vaccine

    The idea being that if you go to hospital with a broken arm, the treatment and investigations are paid for, but you pay a small amount for the plaster-cast and other items that you take home.

    :-)




    Posted from TSR Mobile

    I would say that the idea of charging people for certain things is a bit of a slippery slope - how do we know where to draw the line between free to use and paid? I think charging for anything just defeats the point of the NHS. As a healthcare professional, what would you do if someone broke their arm but then refused to get a cast because he/she didn't want to pay?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Helenia)
    Languageline costs $3.95 per minute (no idea why they price in dollars) http://www.languageline.co.uk/soluti...l-interpreter/. Hospitals in areas with large immigrant populations spend a LOT of money on interpreters. I don't think it's going to save the NHS but it would certainly be a useful saving.
    Spending was £23m last year, so 0.02% of the budget or so. Every little counts i guess, but i don't feel too uncomfortable stretching the definition of 'pittance' in context

    Do you think it is actually an area that could be saved on? I think i've seen a translator being used literally once in Oxford (hashtag demographics?)
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Beska)
    I've not heard that idea before but I think it's a good one! I can't see many downsides to it.
    Its the NHS - can you imagine the bureaucracy involved?!

    Might be a good idea in psych though.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jam')
    I don't think it should be a fee but a deposit of say £5. You'll only end up out of pocket if you miss your appointment.

    (Original post by Beska)
    I've not heard that idea before but I think it's a good one! I can't see many downsides to it.
    Good idea. I read a similar idea the other day which was to charge for missed GP appointments. I still think education/public health is the best route to saving money in the long run though.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Pittawithcheese)
    I would cut the following:

    Gastric bypass surgery;
    Cosmetic surgery (as distinct from plastic surgery);
    Breastfeeding support workers (because the evidence shows they don't work);
    Methadone prescriptions after a certain period of time has elapsed;



    I would also introduce nominal charges for:

    Dressings and other consumables;
    Prescriptions upon discharge;
    Insulin (cumulatively the most expensive prescription medicine in the whole NHS).
    The flu vaccine

    The idea being that if you go to hospital with a broken arm, the treatment and investigations are paid for, but you pay a small amount for the plaster-cast and other items that you take home.

    :-)
    Insulin and the flu vaccine? I don't see why you'd want people to not take their £100 insulin and instead come in in DKA costing thousands, or come in a few years later with wrecked kidneys needing hundreds of thousands spent on kidney transplants and/or dialysis.

    And pretty sure the flu vaccine is quite cost-effective given the amount they spend advertising it every year. Would healthcare workers get it free or would they have to pay too?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by nexttime)
    Its the NHS - can you imagine the bureaucracy involved?!

    Might be a good idea in psych though.
    Ack, knew there would be a problem with it.

    Would probably work well at GP-level though, maybe...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    ... my wrists?
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I would cut the umbilical cord
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah, people here totally know enough about the workings of the NHS to make choices about what should be cut :rolleyes:.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nexttime)
    Spending was £23m last year, so 0.02% of the budget or so. Every little counts i guess, but i don't feel too uncomfortable stretching the definition of 'pittance' in context

    Do you think it is actually an area that could be saved on? I think i've seen a translator being used literally once in Oxford (hashtag demographics?)
    I'm honestly not sure how much could realistically be saved. I have used them a lot more than you, perhaps unsurprisingly, and it can add up really quickly. Even for a simple day case operation, you need an interpreter for the clinic appointment where it's booked, one for pre-assessment clinic, one for the surgeon to take consent on the day, for the anaesthetist to do their assessment and then the ODP to do their pre-op checks - and most of the time we aren't co-ordinated enough to make the last 3 happen in smooth succession. For more complex care, for example involving an ITU stay, needing to keep relatives informed when they also don't speak English, and when face-to-face interpreters are really essential (and more expensive) then the costs can become quite significant.

    Trouble is, how would you arrange payment? Many people couldn't/wouldn't pay up front, so there'd have to be a billing system, with some way to chase them up - and knowing the NHS, that system would probably cost more than the money they get back!
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by arson_fire)
    I`m not disagreeing that its an unpleasant situation to be in, but IVF is not a medical necessity - nobody has to have it to stay healthy. I can`t agree that the taxpayer should pay for it.

    If I changed what you wrote to "The effects of being ugly or flat chested can be pretty horrible, especially when society constantly reinforces the idea of a woman being defined by her looks.", would you say that cosmetic plastic surgery should be freely available on the NHS?
    This is currently the case, as it can be seen as a way to reduce depression
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Not sure if it's been said or not but if I were given the choice i'd make people without an NI card pay for their medical treatment (if under 16then a parents would do) at the end of the day they have to pay/have insurance in other countries. If they have an insurance card for their relevant country then i'd say we should bill them.

    That in itself might gain the nos some money which it could then out elsewhere like preventing closure of much needed services.


    *In no way is this an attack on immigrants (It may be stupid of me but i'm assuming once you're a LEGAL immigrant you get given an NI card?) just hose who illegally slip into our country because they want the free medical care.

    Sorry in advance to anyone who takes offence xx

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiggydiggy)
    Why? Being able to have a child is listed as a basic human right. There is more to medicine about curing diseases. It's about improving quality of life and reducing disability. Why shouldn't medicine intervene in a pathological process which is causing distress and compromising a basic human right?
    It shouldn't be a 'right', just like education or 'fun' that children are 'entitled' to.

    Because cancer causes distress, as does a broken tibia or female circumcision, do we give these problems individual rights? No.

    The overflow of 'rights' are what is destroying democracy. Most of the rights we take for granted are actually privileges. We've just become so far stuck in our socialist ways that we demand the highest quality of life and expect it to be provided by others for us on a plate, usually at their expense or loss of quality of life.

    I am not some neo-primitive idiot who simply strives for survival of the fittest, but I think a lot of people really should reconsider the disgusting use of 'rights' by modern governments to convince people that they have an entitlement to anything that makes them feel warm and fuzzy. I don't want to discontinue IVF whatsoever, I just don't think it's an essential health problem confronting the current population. The money would be far better spent on supporting the private sector which would eventually cause a big decrease in the price of treatments like IVF via competition.

    I really do suggest that you read some Ayn Rand. She might fundamentally change your perceptions on 'rights'.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Basic suggestions:

    1) More volunteering work oppurtunities: A lot of young people actually want to help out at hospitals. If they're given a week of basic training and CRB checked, people coming in to talk to families on wards, reading etc would really boost morale of the hospital, but it's actually very difficult to get into volunteering work these days.

    2) GPs open till late hours to clear up A&E.

    3) All students at secondary school and onwards should recieve 1 hour of a talk with a counselor a year and be encouraged to attend future sessions. This would reduce stress related inflicted problems and help reduce the stigmatism of mental health issues

    4) Food awards at hospitals to keep the standards competitively going up
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AdamskiUK)
    I really do suggest that you read some Ayn Rand. She might fundamentally change your perceptions on 'rights'.
    Medicine is a caring profession - most medics don't tend to be socially awkward objectivists with psychopathic tendencies.

    Shiggydiggy has it spot on, and lol at you for thinking anything about this country is "socialist".
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by TheGuy117)
    Yeah, people here totally know enough about the workings of the NHS to make choices about what should be cut :rolleyes:.
    Well I think the whole point of this thread is to try and discuss a medical school interview question. And, tbf, there are quite a few medical students/doctors kicking around on this thread.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    A reply said, how would you cope with complication of staff shortage at hospitals, in reply to my comment about the massive wage bill for locum doctors, considering some hospital locum trainee doctors earn £2000 per day, a pensioner receives £110 per week basic pension, it has to be addressed what ever complication arise, from staff shortage.

    Highway robbery of tax payers hard earned cash, most on low pay.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...y-doctors.html

    Regard GP's earning extra money from certain prescribed drugs, an example would be blood pressure tabs.

    Depression tablets very expensive and addictive, still be given like sweeties, even though Nice guideline recommends using CBT/CCBT a proved help, as part of depression treatment.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by **** Dastardly)
    A reply said, how would you cope with complication of staff shortage at hospitals, in reply to my comment about the massive wage bill for locum doctors, considering some hospital locum trainee doctors earn £2000 per day, a pensioner receives £110 per week basic pension, it has to be addressed what ever complication arise, from staff shortage.

    Highway robbery of tax payers hard earned cash, most on low pay.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...y-doctors.html

    Regard GP's earning extra money from certain prescribed drugs, an example would be blood pressure tabs.

    Depression tablets very expensive and addictive, still be given like sweeties, even though Nice guideline recommends using CBT/CCBT a proved help, as part of depression treatment.
    To address your last point, a month of Prozac costs about £1. A course of CBT is several hundred pounds.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Why GPs open until late to clear up A&E? If the patients think their problem is an accident or emergency then surely it makes more sense to employ more A&E staff to deal with them, we don't send people along to hospital if we are understaffed in general practice and have lots of people wanting to see us, we look at employing more staff in the long term and seeing more extras in the short term. In our area there is an emergency GP out of hours service who deal with primary care stuff out of hours. If our local A&E think some patients are abusing A&E they tell them to either go away and see their GP in the morning or to contact the OOH service from the phone in A&E.
    You can't just dump more stuff on GPs because the hospital can't cope, we are still working flat out during the day as it is.
    If they're attending inappropriately you educate them and send them away, if they're attending appropriately but there are too many of them you need more staff, but more A&E staff, not GPs, it's a different job requiring different skills..
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: November 26, 2013

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.