AQA GCSE Chemistry C2/C3 May 15th 2014 Watch

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#81
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(Original post by Sophsha)
Nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes i feel like is going to come up, does anyone know how much in depth we are supposed to know?
Large SA, increased rate of reaction and stuff, small so easier diffusion, extremely strong, cheap compared to other materials, buckyballs for drug delivery and that's pretty much all I can remember

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filopastry01
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#82
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Hiya guys, quick question!
Do we need to remember the two formulas for working out titration calculations? Or are we given them in the exam question?
Thanks)
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notevensoph
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#83
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Cryolite is used to lower temperatures
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mickel_w
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#84
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(Original post by Sophsha)
Nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes i feel like is going to come up, does anyone know how much in depth we are supposed to know?
Seen some of these questions before on past papers. A nano particle is a very tiny particle, usually 1-100 nanometers across (this was a question before, how big is a nano particle). Nanoparticles contain roughly a few hundred atoms, occur in the form of hollow balls or closed tubes. The carbon atoms are arranged in hexagonal rings.

They have different properties from the 'bulk material'- so fullerenes are different to carbon.

Fullerenes can be joined together to form nanotubes. All the covalent bonds make these very strong, therefore they are useful for reinforcing graphite tennis rackets. They are much stronger and about 6 times lighter. (don't need to know that last sentence).

You should be able to list at least 3 different ways in which nano particles are being used. E.g. in medicine to administer drugs directly to affected cells, in micro computer chips (as they can conduct electricity) and as lubricant coatings to reduce friction in machinery.

that's all i think
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mickel_w
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(Original post by famzyjaanxx)
yeah i have that feeling too
just learn the advantages and disadvantages at least 5 for each then learn about the structure and the definition of nanoparticles
disadvantages? there aren't any
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(Original post by filopastry01)
Hiya guys, quick question!
Do we need to remember the two formulas for working out titration calculations? Or are we given them in the exam question?
Thanks)
I think you have to remember it, but it's easily done using dimensional analysis

Units of concentration are moles/dm^3. This means that it must be moles divided by dm^3 (unit of volume) so the formula is c=n/V. Everything else can be rearranged from that.

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Dilly27
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#87
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(Original post by filopastry01)
Hiya guys, quick question!
Do we need to remember the two formulas for working out titration calculations? Or are we given them in the exam question?
Thanks)
You need to remember the formulas i think...check past equations sheets on the aqa website
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wildflower09
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(Original post by Iz279)
Ok thanks for the help! The only thing I still don't understand is why you divide by 1000? Am I just being really thick?


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Because the given value is in cm3, and the formula is in dm3. 1000dm3 = 1cm3


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Manexopi
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#89
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I swear we don't need to know about fuel cells and nanoparticles apart from the size and large surface area to volume ratio? Have I just been lied too!? :0
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chronicmusic
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URGENT:

The simplest way of describing a test for positive and for negative ions??
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(Original post by Manexopi)
I swear we don't need to know about fuel cells and nanoparticles apart from the size and large surface area to volume ratio? Have I just been lied too!? :0
That's what I thought too, but seeing as how they seem to like asking weird questions about the topics no one actually learns about (like the fishing stuff in B2 -_-), I think we're better off just learning it
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irMike
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#92
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Ugh, I have no idea how I can practice Titration questions?
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filopastry01
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(Original post by majmuh24)
I think you have to remember it, but it's easily done using dimensional analysis

Units of concentration are moles/dm^3. This means that it must be moles divided by dm^3 (unit of volume) so the formula is c=n/V. Everything else can be rearranged from that.

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Thanks
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Manexopi
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#94
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(Original post by majmuh24)
That's what I thought too, but seeing as how they seem to like asking weird questions about the topics no one actually learns about (like the fishing stuff in B2 -_-), I think we're better off just learning it
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Ah that's true aw man I don't have time to learn it im just going to learn what you guys have been saying cause I have no notes on it :/ do you think the papers will be calculation heavy and do you think it will be harder or was the biology paper a one off? I really want an A* and if AQA screw us over
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Dilly27
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(Original post by mickel_w)
disadvantages? there aren't any
The risks of their large surface area: if a spark is made by accident, they may cause a violent explosion.

Also, breathing in tiny air particles could damage your lungs.
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chronicmusic
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#96
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URGENT:

The simplest way of describing a test for positive and for negative ions??

PLEASE!!
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#97
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(Original post by Manexopi)
Ah that's true aw man I don't have time to learn it im just going to learn what you guys have been saying cause I have no notes on it :/ do you think the papers will be calculation heavy and do you think it will be harder or was the biology paper a one off? I really want an A* and if AQA screw us over
There's no point taking any risks, it could well be a one off but more likely that they're all going to be like that TBH. May as well come prepared.

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notevensoph
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#98
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Anyone else taking chemistry for a level?
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mickel_w
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#99
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(Original post by Manexopi)
Ah that's true aw man I don't have time to learn it im just going to learn what you guys have been saying cause I have no notes on it :/ do you think the papers will be calculation heavy and do you think it will be harder or was the biology paper a one off? I really want an A* and if AQA screw us over
If it's anything like B2, grade boundaries for this will be lower.
All the past papers I've done were relatively straight forward. I got at least 50/60 on each, and there weren't any questions where I thought, 'hmm, was this on the syllabus?'.
So it should be alright. Unless they do a repeat of B2 :/
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mickel_w
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(Original post by Dilly27)
The risks of their large surface area: if a spark is made by accident, they may cause a violent explosion.

Also, breathing in tiny air particles could damage your lungs.
do we have to know this?
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