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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    You are welcome!
    hi. thanks for doing this.
    i'm asking the following myself and my classmates.

    if we have sub-par american college results and we intend to sit for the UK A-level papers and subsequently do very well for them, will our application be rejected outright?

    if my classmate only has 3 poor GCSEs but does everything else the same above, will the outcome be the same in that there is an outright rejection even before she can prove that she can score high grades for her A-levels?

    is the position the same for mature students who have really lousy american college results or GCSEs but then do very well for the A-levels?

    thanks.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Right, having Aspergers, especially with a late diagnosis, certainly counts as extenuating circumstances and your school should fill the form in. This will help to contextualise your performance at GCSE and A Level. Please do not think that we would regard it merely as an 'excuse'.
    Thank you Mr/Miss Admissions Tutor !

    I just downloaded the EC form and I read through it. My school aren't aware of my diagnosis - I never disclosed the details nor the confirmation of my diagnosis because my intentions were/are that I can disclosed it on ucas.

    So my issue is who is able to reliably complete the form as I'm not sure my gp is acceptable (in this case specifically because he didn't diagnose me but referred me for a diagnosis after a brief appointment wherein I discussed my difficulties).

    I really appreciate this help so thank you again.
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    Hey, thanks for making this thread it's really useful!
    So I want to study PhysNatSci at Christ's but I'm worried as I know that it's one of the more popular colleges for my course, with generally stronger applicants. I think my A-Level results will be alright but my GCSEs weren't very good, and I have no extenuating circumstances. (4A*s, 4As, 3Bs although highest grades are in the sciences, maths and FSMQ)
    I'm aware of the pooling system, but I'd assume that different colleges/admissions tutors prioritize GCSEs differently. And also that colleges with less competitive (though of course v. strong) applicants will care less about my GCSEs due to them not being /as/ bad as the others they see. How accurate are these assumptions?
    Also, I'm self-teaching Further and Additional Further Maths, but I haven't done exams for either yet. So would they only be able to assess how relevant this was to my application in an interview?
    Again, thankyou!
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    (Original post by Maura Kat)
    hi. thanks for doing this.
    i'm asking the following myself and my classmates.

    if we have sub-par american college results and we intend to sit for the UK A-level papers and subsequently do very well for them, will our application be rejected outright?

    if my classmate only has 3 poor GCSEs but does everything else the same above, will the outcome be the same in that there is an outright rejection even before she can prove that she can score high grades for her A-levels?

    is the position the same for mature students who have really lousy american college results or GCSEs but then do very well for the A-levels?

    thanks.
    Hi there, in all three cases we would pay closest attention to the most recent results, i.e. the AS Level results you would achieve in the summer before application. Obviously we look at all aspects of the application but if candidates can show a clear upward trajectory in their most recent results, that is always an encouraging sign.
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    (Original post by Ki Yung Na)
    Thank you Mr/Miss Admissions Tutor !

    I just downloaded the EC form and I read through it. My school aren't aware of my diagnosis - the attendance officer of the last two years (she's now left) was aware of my absences mostly due to chronic migraine and appointments with the doctor for my mental health but I never disclosed the details of the latter nor the confirmation of my diagnosis because my intentions were/are that I can disclosed it on ucas.

    On the form it's acceptable for a "doctor or social worker" to fill the form but the doctor (of clinical psychology I believe) has left the NHS and so he can't do it; at present the psychologist who has taken over my care who I saw recently told me he isn't a specialist in aspergers/autism and so he'll redirect me to another organisation or professional to help me with my difficulties - I'll see him in 3 days when he'll discuss his findings regarding who can help me.

    So my issue is who is able to reliably complete the form since the doctor (clinical psychologist) who diagnosed me is no longer at the nhs and I'm not sure my gp is acceptable (in this case specifically because he didn't diagnose me but referred me for a diagnosis after a brief appointment wherein I discussed my difficulties) and of course no other social worker is aware of my case.

    I really appreciate this help so thank you again.
    You are welcome. Your GP would be acceptable as he/she can use your patient notes, it doesn't need to be the clinician who diagnosed you. Alternatively, you can inform the school of your condition and they can then complete the ECF. It is up to you to do what you feel most comfortable with.
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    Hey, thanks for making this thread it's really useful!
    So I want to study PhysNatSci at Christ's but I'm worried as I know that it's one of the more popular colleges for my course, with generally stronger applicants. I think my A-Level results will be alright but my GCSEs weren't very good, and I have no extenuating circumstances. (4A*s, 4As, 3Bs although highest grades are in the sciences, maths and FSMQ)
    I'm aware of the pooling system, but I'd assume that different colleges/admissions tutors prioritize GCSEs differently. And also that colleges with less competitive (though of course v. strong) applicants will care less about my GCSEs due to them not being /as/ bad as the others they see. How accurate are these assumptions?
    Also, I'm self-teaching Further and Additional Further Maths, but I haven't done exams for either yet. So would they only be able to assess how relevant this was to my application in an interview?
    Again, thankyou!
    Your chances of getting into Cambridge won't be affected by which college you choose because of the pooling system. All colleges use to pool to moderate their own candidates and, if necessary, to make offers to candidates placed in the pool by other colleges.

    Your GCSEs are a bit weaker than the average NSP candidate at Cambridge and any college you apply to will be able to see that in the subject moderation spreadsheet we produce for each subject as well as by experience. The spreadhseet details every candidate across every college so an admissions tutor and DoS can see how strong their candidates look compared to the gathered field in that subject across the university. Providing your AS Levels are good, however, this need not be a disadvantage and if your AS Science UMS average is 93% then you will be placed in the pool even if your preference college decides not to make you a direct offer. If you want to apply to Christ's, therefore, you should apply to us if you think you will be happy with us. Equally you should apply to any other college if you feel you liked it. Pick you college on the basis of what you like about the college and not on whether it will maximise your chancces of getting in and remember that whichever college you end up at you should end up happy there.

    We might assess FM and AFM at interview but possibly not as lots of candidates will be in the same situation as you having either not done FM or having only recently started the modules.
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    Hi there I'm writing on behalf of my son who is interested in studying NatSci. Which of his 4 AS subjects would be deemed his three most relevant for the UMS score? He is studying physics, chemistry, biology and maths. Also is the top 3 UMS average given greater weighting than the UMS average for all four subjects? Many thanks for your time.
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    (Original post by KHDevon)
    Hi there I'm writing on behalf of my son who is interested in studying NatSci. Which of his 4 AS subjects would be deemed his three most relevant for the UMS score? He is studying physics, chemistry, biology and maths. Also is the top 3 UMS average given greater weighting than the UMS average for all four subjects? Many thanks for your time.
    Hi there, it depends on which part of Nat Sci he wishes to do. If applies through Biological Natural Sciences (NSB) then we would use Biology, Chemistry and Maths as the three most relevant. He applies through Natural Sciences Physical (NSP) then we would use Physics, Chemistry, Maths.

    Nothing is specifically weighted and we look at all AS grades (and indeed all aspects of the application carefully). Generally, however, we have found that the best correlator for performance at Cambridge in Science courses are the three most relevant and it is the Science UMS (SUMS) average that is calulcated from this and which (alongside GCSE in some subjects) determines ranking in the subject moderation spreadsheet.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    You are welcome. Your GP would be acceptable as he/she can use your patient notes, it doesn't need to be the clinician who diagnosed you. Alternatively, you can inform the school of your condition and they can then complete the ECF. It is up to you to do what you feel most comfortable with.

    I understand; once again thank you for the help.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Your chances of getting into Cambridge won't be affected by which college you choose because of the pooling system. All colleges use to pool to moderate their own candidates and, if necessary, to make offers to candidates placed in the pool by other colleges.

    Your GCSEs are a bit weaker than the average NSP candidate at Cambridge and any college you apply to will be able to see that in the subject moderation spreadsheet we produce for each subject as well as by experience. The spreadhseet details every candidate across every college so an admissions tutor and DoS can see how strong their candidates look compared to the gathered field in that subject across the university. Providing your AS Levels are good, however, this need not be a disadvantage and if your AS Science UMS average is 93% then you will be placed in the pool even if your preference college decides not to make you a direct offer. If you want to apply to Christ's, therefore, you should apply to us if you think you will be happy with us. Equally you should apply to any other college if you feel you liked it. Pick you college on the basis of what you like about the college and not on whether it will maximise your chancces of getting in and remember that whichever college you end up at you should end up happy there.

    We might assess FM and AFM at interview but possibly not as lots of candidates will be in the same situation as you having either not done FM or having only recently started the modules.
    Right, thanks for clearing that all up
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Hi there, in all three cases we would pay closest attention to the most recent results, i.e. the AS Level results you would achieve in the summer before application. Obviously we look at all aspects of the application but if candidates can show a clear upward trajectory in their most recent results, that is always an encouraging sign.
    hi again.

    my friends and I are international students and will be sitting for the AS in the Oct/November session.
    we will then sit for the A-levels in the May/June 2015 session.
    will we be rejected outright since you can't assess us as we don't have any AS grades to show?
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    Hello

    I am a South African postgraduate student completing my Masters degree in Social Anthropology at the University of Cape Town by dissertation only. This degree will be completed in November 2014.

    I have a Bachelor of Social Science from the University of Cape Town, majoring in Social Anthropology and Religious Studies. I received a first class grade for this degree.

    My second degree from the University of Cape Town is a Bachelor of Social Science (Honours) in Social Anthropology, for which I received an upper second grade.

    I would like to apply to apply to Cambridge for the Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic programme, either for the affiliated Bachelors Degree or for the Mphil. While I did not do an undergraduate degree in History or Medieval Studies (the latter is not offered in South Africa), I have a passion for Anglo-Saxon and Norse studies, and have done background reading on the subject since I was a child.

    What are the chances of me getting into the 2015/2016 programme with my grades and not having a cognate degree? I will be 25 at the time of applying for the degree.

    Furthermore, if I am eligible to apply, are there many funding/scholarship or student loan opportunities for South Africans? I am entitled to a UK Ancestry Visa, but this does not allow me to study fulltime as the requirements of the visa are that I be working full time. Thus if I do apply I will have to enter the UK on a student visa.

    Many thanks
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    Hi! Could you explain the term/full term meaning? I'm trying to work some things out for next year (offer holder) and it's confusing me. Also, how long prior to and after term starts/finishes do students tend to stay? For my college I'm looking at a 30 week contract, if that helps.

    Thanks!
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    I am asking this question on behalf of a friend who does not have a TSR account >.<

    Would having good AS Ums average compensate for bad GCSE results? e.g if he has 95% average across the top 3 subjects would it compensate for having 0 A* at GCSE?
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    Hi there

    I'm seeking advice about whether or not I should reapply to Cambridge this autumn. I applied last year to Jesus College for Philosophy. I had straight A*s at GCSE- I was pooled after interview but sadly didn't manage an offer. I was absolutely gutted :'( In the following months, i was diagnosed with several mental health issues that meant my studies were quite disrupted and I really struggled to regain my focus. Though the mental health issues were not due to my rejection from Cambridge- I definitely lost faith in my ability and lost the drive to succeed. I firmed my offer for 38 points at IB from UCL and insured my Durham offer at 36. This week i recieved my IB results and by some ridiculous twist of fate, I came out with 44 points- my subjects were HL Philosophy, History and English and SL Maths, Latin and Biology. Given how far above my UCL offer this is, I feel it would be a shame not to reapply, as I've always had my heart so set on Cambridge.
    Is this a good idea? What is the general consensus on reapplication?
    Other things i'm considering is whether i ought to try Oxford this time round. Secondly whether or not I should apply for Law not Philosophy- as this was always a second choice of subject. Lastly, is there any advice regarding choosing a college? Is there such a thing has being tactical?

    Plleeeeeeeease reply! Any information greatly appreciated
    Thank you so much xx
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    (Original post by Maura Kat)
    hi again.

    my friends and I are international students and will be sitting for the AS in the Oct/November session.
    we will then sit for the A-levels in the May/June 2015 session.
    will we be rejected outright since you can't assess us as we don't have any AS grades to show?
    Well, it depends on how 'sub par' you US college results are but it is possible that you would be rejected without interview if they are relatively poor. our best bets, therefore, may be to wait until you have all your A Level results in August 2015 and then apply in October 2015 for entry in 2016.
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    (Original post by LKeene)
    Hello

    I am a South African postgraduate student completing my Masters degree in Social Anthropology at the University of Cape Town by dissertation only. This degree will be completed in November 2014.

    I have a Bachelor of Social Science from the University of Cape Town, majoring in Social Anthropology and Religious Studies. I received a first class grade for this degree.

    My second degree from the University of Cape Town is a Bachelor of Social Science (Honours) in Social Anthropology, for which I received an upper second grade.

    I would like to apply to apply to Cambridge for the Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic programme, either for the affiliated Bachelors Degree or for the Mphil. While I did not do an undergraduate degree in History or Medieval Studies (the latter is not offered in South Africa), I have a passion for Anglo-Saxon and Norse studies, and have done background reading on the subject since I was a child.

    What are the chances of me getting into the 2015/2016 programme with my grades and not having a cognate degree? I will be 25 at the time of applying for the degree.

    Furthermore, if I am eligible to apply, are there many funding/scholarship or student loan opportunities for South Africans? I am entitled to a UK Ancestry Visa, but this does not allow me to study fulltime as the requirements of the visa are that I be working full time. Thus if I do apply I will have to enter the UK on a student visa.

    Many thanks
    Hi there, you should be a strong candidate for either graduate or affiliated study with a first class degree. If you apply for the undergraduate affiliated course you may wish to apply to one of the mature colleges (Wolfson or Hughes Hall). If you apply for a graduate course then Magdalene College has three Mandela scholarships which may be of interest to you, though I am not sure whether ASNC would fall under a subject 'relevant to the needs of South Africa' as stipulated in the particulars. Alternatively the Cambridge Trust has funding for Commonwealth students.
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    (Original post by Paralove)
    Hi! Could you explain the term/full term meaning? I'm trying to work some things out for next year (offer holder) and it's confusing me. Also, how long prior to and after term starts/finishes do students tend to stay? For my college I'm looking at a 30 week contract, if that helps.

    Thanks!
    'Term' is the historic dates of the university three academic terms and is not something that undergraduates really need to worry about, it is mainly an administrative thing. 'Full term' is the eight weeks of teaching and students must be in residence during 'full term'. Most students will arrive the weekend before 'full term' starts on the Thursday and most will leave on the weekend after 'full term' finishes on the Wednesday but some will stay up longer to continue working in the libraries etc. Colleges have various different leases, a 30-week lease will effectively give you a week either side of 'full term' when you can be in residence. A 39-week lease, which some colleges do, allows you to stay in college all through the Christmas and Easter holidays.
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    (Original post by Toxic_Legends)
    I am asking this question on behalf of a friend who does not have a TSR account >.<

    Would having good AS Ums average compensate for bad GCSE results? e.g if he has 95% average across the top 3 subjects would it compensate for having 0 A* at GCSE?
    Yes, it would but not very may students are able to go from 0 A*s to a 95% average.
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    Thank you for doing this christs.
 
 
 
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