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Do you think that Sports Day should be banned? Watch

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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    What do you mean by that?
    You fail to see the value or the lessons in things that aren't explicitly taught to you.
    You don't try to take advantage of situations or opportunities that are given to you because you dislike an aspect of them.

    That's just an awful attitude to take and one that's going to lead to a miserable life and career.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    You fail to see the value or the lessons in things that aren't explicitly taught to you.
    You don't try to take advantage of situations or opportunities that are given to you because you dislike an aspect of them.

    That's just an awful attitude to take and one that's going to lead to a miserable life and career.
    I do fine thank you very much. I'm at uni. I have loads of friends. I'm on the committee for a society and (shockingly) a sports club. I volunteer for Guiding and (just started) Oxfam. I have Bronze and Silver D of E and I'm working towards my Gold. All of this whilst being severely ill. So don't judge me because I don't think you should be bullied and forced to do something which has no benefit.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    If you feel humiliated by losing, then that's your problem. It's not a professional track meet; do your best, have fun. If you're really bothered by your lack of fitness, then get (moderately) fit. It's not hard.

    In my experience, it's the academically brightest kids who get the most opportunities, anyway. It's school: you have dozens of exams, compared to what, 1 sports-day every year?



    Says who?
    Says everyone and anyone with eyes.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I do fine thank you very much. I'm at uni. I have loads of friends. I'm on the committee for a society and (shockingly) a sports club. I volunteer for Guiding and (just started) Oxfam. I have Bronze and Silver D of E and I'm working towards my Gold. All of this whilst being severely ill. So don't judge me because I don't think you should be bullied and forced to do something which has no benefit.
    Kinda proves my point though.

    - You're now working, in various environments, as a team.
    - You have successfully worked as a team before to help everyone to pass the DofE. Twice.
    - You will have had to compete against people for many of those positions, your space at uni, your positions on committees.
    - You are leading a group and teaching people.

    Every single one of those things comes from, or is extremely important in, sports.

    To say it's had no benefit to you is utter bolleaux.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    If you feel humiliated by losing, then that's your problem. It's not a professional track meet; do your best, If you're really bothered by your lack of fitness, then get (moderately) fit.
    People should not be forced to do something that is not in their ability or their curriculum. Sporting ability is not dependent upon fitness levels: long jump, high jump, 100m, 1500 - they all rely on technique, something which is not available to a lot of people.

    have fun.
    Some people do not enjoy sport. Why is that so hard to get your head round? Heck, I hated Geography because I found it uninteresting and irrelevant. That's not "my problem" - my way of thinking and my interests are just part of individuality, something that you need to recognise.

    It's not hard.
    This is vague. It depends too many things to be simply easy or hard.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Kinda proves my point though.

    - You're now working, in various environments, as a team.
    - You have successfully worked as a team before to help everyone to pass the DofE. Twice.
    - You will have had to compete against people for many of those positions, your space at uni, your positions on committees.
    - You are leading a group and teaching people.

    Every single one of those things comes from, or is extremely important in, sports.

    To say it's had no benefit to you is utter bolleaux.
    But I didn't need sport to learn that ****. I learnt it on my own. And don't argue that I didn't because you don't know me or my **** schools so shut up.
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    (Original post by e aí rapaz)
    Says everyone and anyone with eyes.
    Try again:


    Results from 2012 show that around 28% of children aged 2 to 15 were classed as either overweight or obese.
    http://www.noo.org.uk/NOO_about_obesity/child_obesity
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    People should not be forced to do something that is not in their ability or their curriculum. Sporting ability is not dependent upon fitness levels: long jump, high jump, 100m, 1500 - they all rely on technique, something which is not available to a lot of people.

    Some people do not enjoy sport. Why is that so hard to get your head round? Heck, I hated Geography because I found it uninteresting and irrelevant. That's not "my problem" - my way of thinking and my interests are just part of individuality, something that you need to recognise.

    This is vague. It depends too many things to be simply easy or hard.
    Again, you look at it too simplistically and fail to see the bigger picture. You hate geography because you found it irrelevant, but I'll bet at some point you've used a map.

    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    But I didn't need sport to learn that ****. I learnt it on my own. And don't argue that I didn't because you don't know me or my **** schools so shut up.
    You think you didn't, but you'll be surprised where some of the lessons came from. It all adds to your experience and your experience makes you who you are. Take them away and you'd be someone else entirely.
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    (Original post by StrangeBanana)
    Try again:



    http://www.noo.org.uk/NOO_about_obesity/child_obesity
    Thanks for the link. "The latest figures, for 2012/13, show that 18.9% of children in Year 6 (aged 10-11) were obese and a further 14.4% were overweight. "

    That's 33.3% of kids that are overweight or obese at the end of primary school. If that's your argument AGAINST my assertion, then I don't even know what to say! That's a disgustingly high number.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Again, you look at it too simplistically and fail to see the bigger picture. You hate geography because you found it irrelevant, but I'll bet at some point you've used a map.



    You think you didn't, but you'll be surprised where some of the lessons came from. It all adds to your experience and your experience makes you who you are. Take them away and you'd be someone else entirely.
    Yeah, I'd be a happier person if I hadn't been bullied for being bad at sport.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Again, you look at it too simplistically and fail to see the bigger picture. You hate geography because you found it irrelevant, but I'll bet at some point you've used a map.
    I learnt all my map skills from doing Ten Tors. Also, I don't think that maps are on the curriculum any more.

    I found it uninteresting and irrelevant in a greater context. Because it is not a necessary qualification for what I want to do, I had no reason to continue it for GCSEs or A Level. Sure, I think that every subject has its own unique skills that it teaches but the actual subject content themselves will not always interest the student or engage them.

    So far, all of the sporting skills you have mentioned can still be taught in P.E without the need for a compulsory Sports Day.
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Yeah, I'd be a happier person if I hadn't been bullied for being bad at sport.
    Clearly hasn't put you off, though, so can't have been that detrimental.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Clearly hasn't put you off, though, so can't have been that detrimental.
    I do archery which is the least sporty sport there is. So there...

    And yeah, maybe if I hadn't been bullied I wouldn't be ill.
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    I learnt all my map skills from doing Ten Tors. Also, I don't think that maps are on the curriculum any more.

    I found it uninteresting and irrelevant in a greater context. Because it is not a necessary qualification for what I want to do, I had no reason to continue it for GCSEs or A Level. Sure, I think that every subject has its own unique skills that it teaches but the actual subject content themselves will not always interest the student or engage them.

    So far, all of the sporting skills you have mentioned can still be taught in P.E without the need for a compulsory Sports Day.
    You binned it before GCSEs because it was no longer needed.
    Sports days, for pretty much every school I've heard of, finish at yr 10.

    Again, the comparison works.

    Sports day is more than just a day of sports, though, that's what you and numerous other people fail to grasp. PE lessons are fine for the 25-35 of you in the class, most of whom will be your friends, but it's easy to ignore and gain nothing from lessons when it's just your friends mucking about.
    When you're coming together a larger group with the whole of the school also participating it teaches you a lot more.

    And that's before we talk about the logistical problems of people opting in and out of something like that, it's simply easier for the teachers to say "everybody's doing it". Their job is hard enough as it is without picky kids needing them to be in 2 places at once.

    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    I do archery which is the least sporty sport there is. So there...

    And yeah, maybe if I hadn't been bullied I wouldn't be ill.
    At this point you're too entrenched in your mindset that "ugh, sports at school = bad" to hear any kind of logic against you and perish the thought that it was the kids who made it bad, not the sports itself... But no, logic and rationale has no place against someone who's emotionally angry at it. So, enough of your arguing, you're never going to listen to me, and I'm never going to take your argument seriously because I've seen, experienced and taught the benefits to many more people than you.
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    I personally don't even think sports should be a lesson in school; school is for learning, not exercise. 'think exercise is fine and dandy? okay, but try and objectively justify why it should be "a lesson" in school when it could be just another break time? should kids be forced to learn? perhaps (I personally don't think so), should kids be forced to exercise? **** no - the government's role is not to make kids fitter - if that's their role then why aren't they forcing adults to stop smoking and to make them exercise when some of *them* will be dying of those things later on?
    I'm not too pleased with my tax pounds going towards kids doing what they should/could be doing during break/lunch or after school
    it's a waste of money and it might as well be either a free period or a different lesson
    and I don't even believe, technically, in publicly owned educational facilities - I'm only saying this as a matter of opinion within the current structure

    so with sports day, I'd say that it can definitely be an event - but, for the love of god, don't force kids into doing it if they don't want to
    not everybody likes sports, and nobody needs to do it in school. it's like forcing everybody to play music as part of an ensemble - not everybody will be happy with it
    and I'd *definitely* have my fair share of disagreements/hatred towards "cross country" - for a lot of people it is not only torturous (I wasn't even fat when I ran it, I was just asthmatic) but also embarrassing.
    so my last word is that sports don't really have a place in school - school has a purpose, and if it to "teach" kids to do anything, playing football, rugby, jumping etc are so unimportant in that regard so they shouldn't really be included in terms of what I'd do if I were "the dictator" of the education system...
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    You binned it before GCSEs because it was no longer needed.
    Sports days, for pretty much every school I've heard of, finish at yr 10.

    Again, the comparison works.

    Sports day is more than just a day of sports, though, that's what you and numerous other people fail to grasp. PE lessons are fine for the 25-35 of you in the class, most of whom will be your friends, but it's easy to ignore and gain nothing from lessons when it's just your friends mucking about.
    When you're coming together a larger group with the whole of the school also participating it teaches you a lot more.

    And that's before we talk about the logistical problems of people opting in and out of something like that, it's simply easier for the teachers to say "everybody's doing it". Their job is hard enough as it is without picky kids needing them to be in 2 places at once.



    At this point you're too entrenched in your mindset that "ugh, sports at school = bad" to hear any kind of logic against you and perish the thought that it was the kids who made it bad, not the sports itself... But no, logic and rationale has no place against someone who's emotionally angry at it. So, enough of your arguing, you're never going to listen to me, and I'm never going to take your argument seriously because I've seen, experienced and taught the benefits to many more people than you.
    Oh ****, you're a PE teacher, aren't you? I bet you're one of those ones who bullies all the bad kids because that's what you used to do in school. You're exactly the type of person who is everything that is wrong about PE.
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    my school don't say it is compulsory to take part in sports day, in fact it is impossible for everyone in my school to take part as there aren't enough places in events for everyone. there was only one event (1500m race :eek:) that was open to everyone and although teachers tried to make you do it, it was optional. I never did it, i am not a sporty person and don't fancy being humiliated in front of people i know. there was only one event i was good at, the long jump, but my school decided not to do that event when i was seriously thinking of taking part.
    it is a nice atmosphere though, everyone can come and watch and so you don't need to actually take part to be involved in the day.
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    People should not be forced to do something that is not in their ability or their curriculum.
    Why?

    (Original post by Hariex)
    Sporting ability is not dependent upon fitness levels: long jump, high jump, 100m, 1500m - they all rely on technique, something which is not available to a lot of people.
    Bull. Fitness is 80% or more of sporting ability, 90% for track events. They're just running, dude; there IS no technique involved unless you're competing at a semi-professional level or above. Long jump is just running and jumping, high jump is high jumping, 100m is running fast, and 1500m is running for a longer period of time. If you are not fit, you will not do well in sports*. If you are fit, you will. It's that simple, and is really not up for discussion.

    (Original post by Hariex)
    Some people do not enjoy sport. Why is that so hard to get your head round? Heck, I hated Geography because I found it uninteresting and irrelevant. That's not "my problem" - my way of thinking and my interests are just part of individuality, something that you need to recognise.
    Sport is fun if you put effort into it (you don't have to have natural talent, either; I'm terrible at footie but still enjoy playing it with mates occasionally). Also (and this was my point initially), it's a day out with friends, with no lessons, hopefully in the sun. What else do you want? While we're on this topic, though: in my experience, the kids at school who find subjects "boring" are just lazy. Learning is always enjoyable if you choose to enjoy it (except in a minority of cases where the teacher really is appalling, but this really is a tiny minority). Somehow, I doubt you'll agree.

    (Original post by Hariex)
    This is vague. It depends too many things to be simply easy or hard.
    No it isn't, and no it doesn't. Go to the park and run for an hour each day, drink 4 litres of water daily, eat plenty of fruit and vegetables, and don't eat junk-food. Don't make excuses for not being able to do exercise, either. If you've got a knee injury, go swimming, or join a pilates class

    *This does not include a small number of sports like darts/pool where it is pretty much 100% technique, but these are rarely (read: never) used in sports days.

    Relevant Stephen Fry video:
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    Oh ****, you're a PE teacher, aren't you? I bet you're one of those ones who bullies all the bad kids because that's what you used to do in school. You're exactly the type of person who is everything that is wrong about PE.
    See, now you really are just showing your true colours and prejudices. Quite sad, really... And really pathetic.

    I was in the RAF, I was a volunteer at Cubs and Scouts and an adult member of the Air Cadets, at university I was Chairman and Captain of various sport clubs and a coach. In more recent years I've been a ski instructor all over the world.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Sports day is more than just a day of sports, though, that's what you and numerous other people fail to grasp. PE lessons are fine for the 25-35 of you in the class, most of whom will be your friends, but it's easy to ignore and gain nothing from lessons when it's just your friends mucking about.
    When you're coming together a larger group with the whole of the school also participating it teaches you a lot more.
    Fair enough, I see your point now.

    However, I think that these values of sportsmanship should be far more emphasised. I do not feel that they are at this moment in time - if they were, there would be little shame in participating in an event. Part of the reasons for why people feel humiliation are solely because of the opinions of others. Perhaps this is where the actual problem lies?

    I do not think that having a Sports Day as it is will be enough to communicate these ideas about sportsmanship.
 
 
 
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