Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Why don't or wouldn't you vote? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Why don't/wouldn't you vote?
    I do vote (please state why)
    76
    65.52%
    It doesn't interest me
    6
    5.17%
    I don't care about who wins
    7
    6.03%
    I can't choose - there's more than 1 party I like
    3
    2.59%
    I don't know enough about their policies
    5
    4.31%
    I don't think my vote will make a difference
    20
    17.24%
    I can't be bothered
    11
    9.48%
    Other (please state)
    12
    10.34%

    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Other (Will not not be old enough to vote)

    Would probably vote LibDem though in my constituency.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dylanfar)
    I couldn't agree more. Most politicians may drink from the same Kool-Aid but it's a right to vote, so I'll take it.

    I don't see anyone willingly surrendering rights like that to a fair trial, so why surrender the right to vote?
    Just because you have a right does not mean it is a right you should exercise. In the case of voting, yes you should and you should in the case of fair trials as well. But being allowed to do something does not automatically entail that you should do it, for fairly obvious reasons.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    An acceptance of the primacy of the State over the nation is an acceptance that the individual is a subject of the State (that is, the people in charge of it) - that is an anathema to the democratic philosophy which the authority figures of some States espouse with monotonous regularity (and do everything in their power to frustrate). A functioning democracy posits a community that possesses eminent domain over itself and the territory it occupies, if it does not then it cannot be a democracy because without the electorate having the ability to directly select and remove their own authority figures democracy does not exist. If authority figures accept that their power is conditional on decisive periodic review, (elections, or in extremis perfunctory removal – after a referendum), they are acknowledging that the collection of citizens over which they have been conceded control are the ultimate authority (eminent domain) - a building block for a democratic system. In the interest of efficient government a nation would, of necessity, conditionally delegate the right of eminent domain to State authorities legitimised by elections (which in the interest of stability should reflect the general political disposition of the nation) for the day to day direction of the State. The State should be the steward of the nation not its master. A vote for any party in the present rigged election system is an acknowledgement of contentment as a subject of the State (and monarch) and that democracy is not on the political agenda (unless your one of the minority who believe that by supporting an entrenched establishment you can change it – your support will only encourage them to not change their behaviour).
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I vote, and will always vote when possible.

    I missed the local and EU elections this year, but that was because of moving house. The timings just screwed everything up and I ended up not registered locally.

    I did vote in the 2010 elections though, and I will vote next year.

    Why:
    1. Because various people fought for my right to vote (not just for women to vote, but for the working class to vote, etc), and I think it is an insult to that to not use the right.
    2. Because I actually understand political issues, and policies, and do my research. There are far too few people in our country who actually educate themselves on the issues before voting, and just listen to propaganda. I need to vote to try and counter-balance that large proportion of our population.
    3.Because I believe that if you don't bother to vote, you really don't have much right to complain about what policies the government end up bringing in. You didn't even try to make a difference and sway it one way or the other.

    That said, I would very much like the "vote of no confidence" back.

    My younger sister is 21, has never voted, and has no intention of doing so. She says she can't be bothered, but basically she knows nothing about politics at all. If I mentioned the conservative party she would have no idea what I meant.
    She says it's boring, and so doesn't want to. No matter how much I try to explain to her how important it is, and how much these things will affect her life, she doesn't bother.
    I hope I can bring her around to caring one day.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Vote Conservative.
    • Study Helper
    • Welcome Squad
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I put:
    I don't care about who wins

    Why? Because at the end of the day they all do something i'll like. And other stuff I won't. None live up to what they say they will do.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NewWithHashtags.)
    Please help - I'm trying to get some feedback from university students about why you don't or wouldn't vote in the general/local/etc elections. Please explain your reasoning below.

    I'd also like voters to state why they do. Please help!
    Because the street is never listened to, because manifesto's are propaganda and until they become legally binding and subject to judicial review if not adhered to then most will not trust the scum in power, because power by its very nature is corrupting, because all the parties are pro american zionist supporting filth, career politics, never being straight or answering the actual question asked by anyone not even during pm quest time, supporting tyrants in saudi, jordan, qata, bahrain, burma, kuwait, egypt, iraq, yemen .......etc etc

    any more reason to not vote?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RFowler)
    5/6 of people in this country do not live in London.

    Ever thought that maybe a lot of people just don't want to live in London? London is no better than any other city. People often bring up the whole "it's grim oop north" stereotype but that is a generalisation, and there are parts of London which are just as bad. Just like there are parts of other cities which perform better than average. And not everyone wants to live in a city either.

    London being the "source of most of the economic ability of the UK" isn't a reason why politics is London centric (assuming that statement about economic ability is even true, which is highly questionable, as subject delta's post explains). You've got it the wrong way round - it's actually a symptom of London centric politics.

    London is absolutely not the only place worth caring about. How much time have you spend outside London? Your post suggests not a lot.
    Grew up in the country in Sussex until I was 6. Beautiful place and I plan to retire there. No other city is worth living in and I stand by everything I've said.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I will vote but I am pretty apathetic to with the whole thing.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone else?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yahamas)
    Because the street is never listened to, because manifesto's are propaganda and until they become legally binding and subject to judicial review if not adhered to then most will not trust the scum in power, because power by its very nature is corrupting, because all the parties are pro american zionist supporting filth, career politics, never being straight or answering the actual question asked by anyone not even during pm quest time, supporting tyrants in saudi, jordan, qata, bahrain, burma, kuwait, egypt, iraq, yemen .......etc etc

    any more reason to not vote?
    I think you've mistaken 'the street' (by which I assume you mean ordinary people) for your own views. Funnily enough most people don't care that much about foreign policy and are actually pretty pro-American. Most people care far more about the economy, the health service and that their kids will get a decent education.

    British manifestos are a pretty good guide to what a party will do. Things change and they can't always be implemented in full but a vast majority of policies are enacted. I may not agree with those policies but they certainly happen and they certainly make a difference.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I vote and I'm very proud that I do.

    A lot of people seem to confuse voting with getting their own way. That isn't how it works - if a more people favour a different party or different values then you shouldn't win - that doesn't mean that making your statement and your point is worthless.

    As for those who say that there isn't a choice - that's rubbish. Each party presents clearly different visions for Britain. They come from different places and have different sets of values. Yes each party tries to impose those values within a particular situation which limits them but they certainly make a huge difference - look at the difference in the UK between 1995 and 2005, or between 2010 and 2014.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Everybody should vote. Why wouldn't you vote? It's a duty and a privilege.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    The only reason that would compel me not to vote is, quite simply, a lack of choice. Sure, there are dozens of parties I could vote for - but there is little distinction between the meaningful options. With that being said, since 2010, the emergence of UKIP and Labour drifting slightly more to the left, perhaps it won't be long before we see the breakdown of the so-called 'Westminster consensus'.

    (Original post by Will95206)
    Yeah good one mate.

    What an ignorant answer, clearly you don't deserve a vote and presumably you would like to live in an authoritarian country like China where there is not face book, TSR ect....

    Oh but wait! Thats's it you don't care if it is Chairman Mao or President Putin as they are just 'the same person, different tie. Nothing ever changes.' I am sure people though that when people in German in the late 1930's voted for Hitler and the Nazi's....
    I think he was answering within a British context - and his answer certainly has some truth to it.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I vote on local issues (including MP) where I'd rather exercise some choice. Nationally the system is broken and whoever gets to Downing Street always turns corrupt and/or insane.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.