Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How Many Languages Can You Speak Fluently? Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by itsRochana)
    Salam! Kaifa haloki(a) ?
    ana bi khair, shukran; waa kaifa halaki?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lolarose8)
    ana bi khair, shukran; waa kaifa halaki?
    Jayed.Ahtaaju an atadarraba 'ala al arabia
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    The only one you need - English.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    conversational is vague from some of these guys. Have you learned them independently or is it just going from GCSE as well?

    english / french / arabic fluently.

    Spanish ("conversational" where I can get by day to day life but not have, say a political debate in it.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by David B)
    What happens after the week?
    I could then be classed as the 'foreign noob' :ahee:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EverybodyHertz)
    I could then be classed as the 'foreign noob' :ahee:
    Lol
    :ms:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    1) English :facepalm:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    English and Bengali fluently.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    english (fluent)
    filipino/tagalog (fluent)
    french (just about conversational[thank you GCSE french])
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    five
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DropkickSmurfy)
    I was raised trilingual - English (native tongue), Italian (father is Italian) and Spanish (mother is Hispanic-American).

    The Spanish I was raised speaking is castellano de Chile (i.e. Chilean Spanish), as my grandfather is Chilean (and thus that's what my mum was raised speaking, as well as English). Castellano de Chile has differences in pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary to standard Spanish, as well of course its own slang terms.

    I also took both languages at GCSE and A-Level, taking Italian two years early in each case. However, with Spanish, I'm actually learning new things, because obviously it is taught as standard Spanish. At first, I found it quite a challenge to alter my way of thinking, in terms of the differences between Spanish and Chilean Spanish, but soon managed to adapt to the differences.
    My parents are exactly the same.

    Did you find one parent was more willing to teach their first language than the other?

    Vivo cerca de Londres, osea si quieres hablar mas mandame un mensaje!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈ ✈)
    My parents are exactly the same.

    Did you find one parent was more willing to teach their first language than the other?

    Vivo cerca de Londres, osea si quieres hablar mas mandame un mensaje!
    I'm the youngest of six, so by the time it got to me, our family household was already well established as a trilingual one.

    However, I have it on good authority from my brother, that our dad was the more willing to pass on his language. I asked my dad about it, and he said it was really important to him that my siblings and I spoke Italian, as it was a connection between us and him, and also his own parents.

    My mum was born and raised in the US, so was educated in English, while speaking both Spanish and English at home. Yet as the area she grew up in, didn't have a large Hispanic population, English was the language she used the most. I think she probably saw English as "her" language, and Spanish was something passed to her by her parents.

    I'm not sure what changed her mind, I've never asked, but I think I might now I've thought about it.

    NB: Will message you soon, when I think of what to say, LOL!
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    English (fluent)
    Portuguese (fluent, but not as good as my English)
    German (near fluent)
    Italian (near fluent)
    Spanish (conversational)
    Japanese (near fluent, but not as good as my German/Italian)
    Swedish (conversational)
    Korean (conversational)

    My mum is Portuguese, so I learnt Portuguese as a child with my grandmother (my mum only really speaks English to me). German I learnt at school, I'm doing A level. Italian I learnt at school. Spanish I didn't learn, but because I speak Portuguese I understand most of it and can hold conversations with people. Japanese I self taught and am now doing A level in it. Swedish and Korean are both self taught, and I'll probably reach fluency in Swedish sometime next year.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by itsRochana)
    je suis trooooop jalouse
    Mais il semble qu'il ne comprend pas la difference entre 'sans' et 'sauf'...
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    Mais il semble qu'il ne comprend pas la difference entre 'sans' et 'sauf'...
    Lool. il est un amateur
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I only speak fluent English and conversational Korean OTL
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources
    AtCTs

    Ask the Community Team

    Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

    Welcome Lounge

    Welcome Lounge

    We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.