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    (Original post by LJStudent)
    Some kids are really arrogant and don't want to do a decent job on minimum wage. They think that because they're studying advanced A Levels or a degree that working at a bar and washing dishes is a rubbish job when in actual fact it would give them money they probably need and would give them valuable life experience in a job environment.
    Arrogant? You've worked for an additional 3 years to be told that you should be working the same jobs as people 5 years younger than yourself who've just got a few GCSE's. I don't actually view that as arrogance, but instead it's a fairly objective view of the situation and what sort of thing you should be doing.
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    (Original post by AlexKay99)
    I'm hoping to start at a charity shop in my town but I know its not going to guarantee anything, its sad really because employers tend to not care about volunteering anymore, there are so many people I've met that have done tonnes of volunteer work; still nothing.
    I've been working at a charity shop for close to 4 years now and honestly, it may not guarantee you a job anywhere but the actual work experience of being in an environment and talking to different people is more valuable than the job prospects. The one I work at is in a very, shall we say, "bohemian" town so there's a few "interesting" characters

    Volunteering work shows that you are compassionate and open minded so potential employers will take this into account
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    (Original post by AlexKay99)
    So the general elections are on the horizon and of course many MP's have started to remember how bad youth unemployment is and how they need to 'reform' it.

    What are your opinions on this issue? Is it getting better, worse or is it not changing? What do you think can be done to tackle this more effectively?
    Most importantly, why are we, as youths, constantly ignored?

    Please share!
    Firstly we have terrible voter turn out. That can't help. That and we expect to whore ourselves out with zero contract hours jobs or work for free just to get a chance to not be poor. Then there is the whole the three main parties being very similar in that they are willing to shaft over younger people. That could change if we would vote...
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    (Original post by limetang)
    Arrogant? You've worked for an additional 3 years to be told that you should be working the same jobs as people 5 years younger than yourself who've just got a few GCSE's. I don't actually view that as arrogance, but instead it's a fairly objective view of the situation and what sort of thing you should be doing.
    On the contrary, I'd still label it as arrogance. Note that I only said "some" people, not all young people.

    To do some A Levels or a degree and suddenly think that you know everything is arrogant, there's no way of dressing it up. Lipstick on a pig, my friend...

    You have to start at the bottom. In the tough job market currently, the graduate with lots of work experience when they were younger, whether that be washing dishes or working at a till, will be superior to a graduate with no work experience.

    Obviously it's frustrating to those who have studied an advanced degree and expect that they'll be able to contribute to their field 6 months after graduating but unfortunately the harsh reality is that there are not a lot of jobs. I'm going to start my own business so this isn't as much of a problem for me (not sure why everyone else hasn't seen this yet as an obvious solution) but for those going into Dentistry or Medicine, Biochemistry or Physics, it's much more difficult.

    People need to realise that these kind of menial jobs are pretty much all that's going at the moment and lower their standards and be patient for times to get better.
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    (Original post by LJStudent)
    I've been working at a charity shop for close to 4 years now and honestly, it may not guarantee you a job anywhere but the actual work experience of being in an environment and talking to different people is more valuable than the job prospects. The one I work at is in a very, shall we say, "bohemian" town so there's a few "interesting" characters

    Volunteering work shows that you are compassionate and open minded so potential employers will take this into account
    I'm nevertheless excited to start doing something in a real working environment and I do hope employers would take what you said into account!
    These days society seems to blame us for being disillusioned, that we think because we went to uni, the world owes us a job but in fact that is what the government twenty or so years ago told us would happen. It made uni an almost requirement and a lot of bogus universities started springing up, now they are dealing with the consequence of too many graduates when in reality university should really be the cherry on top, as it always was. It is a place for those who love learning and moreover, are passionate about their subject, not those who think 'if I go here and study this I'll get more money later in life'.
    I think the government raised the tuition fees to £9000 for that reason, in an attempt to minimise the number of graduates.
    Many believe it is the employers' fault and yes there is a degree of truth to that but I think we can all agree that the majority of the fault lays with the government as well as society.

    I wish you all the best in your job search.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Firstly we have terrible voter turn out. That can't help. That and we expect to whore ourselves out with zero contract hours jobs or work for free just to get a chance to not be poor. Then there is the whole the three main parties being very similar in that they are willing to shaft over younger people. That could change if we would vote...
    I actually read an EU report recently that young people are purposefully not voting because no party pays attention to them. Since the 2009 EU elections, youth votes more than halved by this year's elections and the same is happening with national elections.

    Young people are apathetic and they don't wish to vote for those who don't pay any attention to their needs.
    Even though it is somewhat of a taboo to not vote, I think this is a smart move, it may cause the parties to change their manifesto's and focus on us a bit more, then the situation may improve.

    But then again, I don't know. We shall see.
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    (Original post by AlexKay99)
    I actually read an EU report recently that young people are purposefully not voting because no party pays attention to them. Since the 2009 EU elections, youth votes more than halved by this year's elections and the same is happening with national elections.

    Young people are apathetic and they don't wish to vote for those who don't pay any attention to their needs.
    Even though it is somewhat of a taboo to not vote, I think this is a smart move, it may cause the parties to change their manifesto's and focus on us a bit more, then the situation may improve.

    But then again, I don't know. We shall see.
    Well in the UK governments are elected on a very small percentage of the votes and that doesn't even take into account the crap voter turnout. Basically not voting wont really fix anything as the current system thrives of voter apathy. Not voting is only going to work if the disenfranchised are actively doing something constructive like organizing themselves or creating a new political party (see the origins of the labour movement). Not voting and then continuing as normal with the daily grind and coming home to watch TV etc wont change anything.

    Also say if New Labour was willing to change stuff in the younger generations faver they would need our votes to get in. If they feel we aren't going to vote anyway they will pursue other policies that people will vote for.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Well in the UK governments are elected on a very small percentage of the votes and that doesn't even take into account the crap voter turnout. Basically not voting wont really fix anything as the current system thrives of voter apathy. Not voting is only going to work if the disenfranchised are actively doing something constructive like organizing themselves or creating a new political party (see the origins of the labour movement). Not voting and then continuing as normal with the daily grind and coming home to watch TV etc wont change anything.

    Also say if New Labour was willing to change stuff in the younger generations faver they would need our votes to get in. If they feel we aren't going to vote anyway they will pursue other policies that people will vote for.
    Yes but young people represent one, if not, the largest population subgroup and if they all don't vote, they'd tear out a big hole and it would be harder for parties to get by. The reason why it all started was for the reason that parties did not represent them in the first place not because they 'saw that they didn't vote and thereby started targeting other groups'.
    The only reason Glegg is in a coalition is that he promised not to raise the tuition fees therefore he won a huge number of votes and look what happened, the manipulative Ukip has actually become more popular because Ukip also targets the 'forgotten population'.

    The initial problem was that young people stopped voting because parties never targeted them in the first place.
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    (Original post by AlexKay99)
    Yes but young people represent one, if not, the largest population subgroup and if they all don't vote, they'd tear out a big hole and it would be harder for parties to get by. The reason why it all started was for the reason that parties did not represent them in the first place not because they 'saw that they didn't vote and thereby started targeting other groups'.
    The only reason Glegg is in a coalition is that he promised not to raise the tuition fees therefore he won a huge number of votes and look what happened, the manipulative Ukip has actually become more popular because Ukip also targets the 'forgotten population'.

    The initial problem was that young people stopped voting because parties never targeted them in the first place.
    I'm not against not voting providing there is some sort of constructive action taken place. But then that's kind of hard when you are saddled with debt. People in debt are less likely to rock the boat. Students used to be very politically involved, barley any of that anymore.
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    (Original post by AlexKay99)
    I'm nevertheless excited to start doing something in a real working environment and I do hope employers would take what you said into account!
    These days society seems to blame us for being disillusioned, that we think because we went to uni, the world owes us a job but in fact that is what the government twenty or so years ago told us would happen. It made uni an almost requirement and a lot of bogus universities started springing up, now they are dealing with the consequence of too many graduates when in reality university should really be the cherry on top, as it always was. It is a place for those who love learning and moreover, are passionate about their subject, not those who think 'if I go here and study this I'll get more money later in life'.
    I think the government raised the tuition fees to £9000 for that reason, in an attempt to minimise the number of graduates.
    Many believe it is the employers' fault and yes there is a degree of truth to that but I think we can all agree that the majority of the fault lays with the government as well as society.

    I wish you all the best in your job search.
    Yeah, totally agree man. You too
 
 
 
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