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somebody please explain what is happening to as and alevels? Watch

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    This probably sounds stupid, and sorry, but is this a new act from the old education secretary or the new one? If it's the old one, whom everyone hated, surely the new one would scrap all this?
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    This was how the old A-levels were. It was how our teachers took them! They actually dumbed it down for us - as what the A-levels are now.

    They are going back to the "original way"! But I do know it's unfair! HOWEVER, the new kids who will be doing the new GCSEs will be more prepared for the new A-levels, than the kids who will be entering Year 11 in Sept, they will be the guinea pigs for this educational experiment!
    Lord I feel so sorry for them. I don't think I'm stupid, even though I can be aha. But I didn't really have much of a problem with GCSE's. Surely though, they're just leading more of them on to fail. Especially if they have an expectation to do as well as the older ones did. I struggled with A levels psychologically. I just found the jump too big and I felt really put down. I'm the type of person who doesn't bother if I can't do it, so I just think making the hurdles larger for students is just going to cause them to not even try.
    I think it's so unfair they're going to be the "experiments" because they'll suffer the consequences for having seemingly worse grades. They should have just left it as it is. I think it's irresponsible they didn't. They're just putting more pressure on people
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    (Original post by 06shawm)
    Yes, so I imagine you will study 4 AS levels in year 12. Once you have completed these and have your grades. You will then have your predicted grades which you will apply to university with. Then in year 13 you will study a-levels. These are totally separate to AS levels. Therefore your grades at AS will have no effect on your A level grades. Your a-level grades will be solely determined by how you perform in your exams at the end of year 13.
    I actually wish it was like that when I was at college, my AS level grades really pulled down my overall grade
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    (Original post by 06shawm)
    September 2015
    THANK GOD I WAS ABOUT TO CRY!!! :/


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    (Original post by Gorwell)
    So what if us 2014 lot need to retake? :ahhhhh:
    In this boat


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    (Original post by AR_95)
    In this boat


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    You're in year 12? What's with the 95?
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    (Original post by Gorwell)
    You're in year 12? What's with the 95?
    Finished 13 sorry think I'm retaking though


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    (Original post by AR_95)
    Finished 13 sorry think I'm retaking though


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    Don't say that yet! I'm sure you've done great
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    (Original post by ImagineCats)
    This probably sounds stupid, and sorry, but is this a new act from the old education secretary or the new one? If it's the old one, whom everyone hated, surely the new one would scrap all this?
    It's from the old secretary, but the plans are too far in place for a sudden turn around of it all. If Gove was only in early discussions, with a vague "yea about 2015 would be good what can we do", she probably could have turned it around.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    The AS & A-level qualifications are still separate, BUT they will be able to be taught at the same time, with the same class etc. It is called "co-teachable A-levels".

    So imagine, this: if you take English Literature at sixth form.... You will be reading all the same texts as your class mates. However your sixth form might say "right the English department is giving pupils the opportunity to see if you guys will be right to study the next year of this course, so you will sit the AS-level exam. If you succeed, we will carry your marks over to the A-level qualification, thus continuing your studies. If you don't succeed, you will not carry the marks forward, and you will end up with an AS-level in English Literature."

    Does this make any sense to you?

    So if you end up with an AS-level qualification, that would be one year, and then you will continue studying your other subjects to A-level in your final year. So all of this will be studied over a period of 2 years.
    You are correct when you say that examiners are trying to produce co teachable AS/A levels that should enable students to achieve an AS level qualification at the end of the first year and either drop it or continue study and complete a full A level. However, it is not yet confirmed with approved specifications that this will be the case for every subject/examiner or that all schools will choose to offer it.

    However, when you say "if you succeed, we will carry your marks over to the A-level qualification" this seems to imply things are the same as they are now. They are not, no marks will carry over towards the full A level qualification, the full A level exams will test All of the content of the two years of study independently of any result gained at AS.


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    Wow they reformed GCSE's after my year when I sat them in 2011/2012 can't remember which and now they're reforming A-levels after the year below. I've had a lucky escape both times haha
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    They shall not use your GCSEs to predict your A-level results!! I've seen many exam board online briefing and most schools with use an electronic database system to predict your grades from the assessments you will do for them throughout the year in those subjects. Your GCSEs will become irrelevant to them.

    SATs was abolished when I was in year 9 which was in 2009. You would have been in Year 8 then I'm sure? Anywho, they say they used SATs, but they don't because they don't count towards League Tables anymore which is why they abolished it. They perhaps use them to test you at the end of years to determine your GCSE sets and pathways, but nothing more. They don't use SATs to predict your GCSEs. And they don't use GCSEs to predict your A-levels either.

    I will have you know, many teachers are against the new reform and do not like it as Gove has brought it on way too quickly. Yes it removes less paper work, but however, it's more rigorous than every before, thus putting more pressure on teachers to do well first time. If their students fail the GCSE and A-level exams over the 2 year basis, teachers will most likely get the blame for "not preparing them well enough". Teachers will be more stressed. Plus they only will have about half a year to prepare for this new academic change, which is stressful as it is!
    Oh god now you're asking! I done my SATs umm, when I was, I guess 11 which was in yes 2008! So I done my SATs in '08 and I don't know why but I thought SATs are still continuing? Anyway the teacher thing I just completely go against this new A-Levels system for 2015 it's seriously becoming more complicated and a lot more challenging than it already is, if the system changes you got to at least have some experience and knowledge about how complicated the system is anyway
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    Scenario C will be you picking 4 AS levels.
    Now, what will happen is that you shall pick your subject and then most likely will do at least 2 papers per subject in all these 4 AS levels (if they are the NEW A-level. For example, Media Studies, and Maths are the few subjects that won't be changed until the start of Sept 2017, for first award in 2019 for the A-levels). You will then have your exams at the end of Year 12, so in May 2016.
    Does this mean that if someone takes Maths and Further Maths will have 12 exams on top their other subjects come 2017?
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    (Original post by ElGenioEstúpido)
    Does this mean that if someone takes Maths and Further Maths will have 12 exams on top their other subjects come 2017?
    Not necessarily. At the moment there are 6 exams for each of Maths and Further Maths, but the new Maths A levels (taught from September 2016, not 2017 as a previous poster put) may well revert to the pre-2000ish system of 2, 3 hour papers for each A level.
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    (Original post by Dani04)
    Oh god now you're asking! I done my SATs umm, when I was, I guess 11 which was in yes 2008! So I done my SATs in '08 and I don't know why but I thought SATs are still continuing?
    KS3 SATs were last obligatory in 2008 but KS2 SATs have continued. The government measures schools against their pupils' progress from KS2 to GCSE (and then GCSE to A level) so this is what schools almost always base their targets on.
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    (Original post by Compost)
    KS3 SATs were last obligatory in 2008 but KS2 SATs have continued. The government measures schools against their pupils' progress from KS2 to GCSE (and then GCSE to A level) so this is what schools almost always base their targets on.
    Oh right! Thanks I understand better now
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    (Original post by fortunesfool)
    Ahh, what are you doing at Uni?
    I'm studying medicine
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    (Original post by Marii101)
    This is my sister She literally escaped all of Gove's reforms while I have had to deal with all of the new GCSE linear reforms and will have to deal with the new A-Levels come 2015. Why do they make everything so confusing?
    I honestly don't know tbh, they just want a simpler and more rigorous exam system I guess
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    The AS & A-level qualifications are still separate, BUT they will be able to be taught at the same time, with the same class etc. It is called "co-teachable A-levels".

    So imagine, this: if you take English Literature at sixth form.... You will be reading all the same texts as your class mates. However your sixth form might say "right the English department is giving pupils the opportunity to see if you guys will be right to study the next year of this course, so you will sit the AS-level exam. If you succeed, we will carry your marks over to the A-level qualification, thus continuing your studies. If you don't succeed, you will not carry the marks forward, and you will end up with an AS-level in English Literature."

    Does this make any sense to you?

    So if you end up with an AS-level qualification, that would be one year, and then you will continue studying your other subjects to A-level in your final year. So all of this will be studied over a period of 2 years.
    They are separate qualifications. Therefore the marks from the AS cannot be carried over to the A-level qualification.
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    (Original post by 06shawm)
    I'm studying medicine
    Not too shabby
 
 
 
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