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    (Original post by lucaf)
    and I suppose you are a precious snowflake?
    Why patronising?

    the real world has arbitrary rules and schedules, you can't avoid that. Also so does parenting, unless you plan on successfully explaining the reasoning behind your every instruction to a kid yet to learn to tie their shoes.
    I plan on explaining things to them. My parents always told me "question everything. If you can't see a reason why, don't do it". I was treated as a person, not patronised!




    I would argue that the uniform policy encourages equality. If kids have their own clothes, it it just another thing for them to pick on each other for.
    Instead, shouldn't we encourage people not to pick on each other about clothes?
    And that is a bit of a **** thing to say, but lets be honest that isn't entirely without truth.
    So I should have to bore myself, talking to them about their stupid parties and TOWIE instead of doing something I enjoy, which doesn't harm anyone? No. They should be taught people have different hobbies and that's okay



    And what changes would you recommend? Because as I see it, people need jobs, jobs need skills, employers need a way of judging skills. I don't particularly see a reason to take a stand, society mostly works well and I am doing well in it.
    A few off the top of my head

    1) Tattoos and piercings in the work place. What exactly is wrong with someone having pink hair and a nose ring? Or a tattoo? let's stop saying there's a proper way to look

    2) Stop the heteronormative abelist way we look at things. Would it kill kids books to have a disabled character?

    3) Let's celebrate people's differences instead of trying to fit them into a mould. Instead of saying "you need to change x" lets look at people's strengths

    4) Get rid of compulsary subjects. Making someone talented in sport do maths isn't going to make them Einstein. Let's nurture their talent

    5) Appreciate all talents. Instead of schools focusing on sports, lets also recognise the guy who won the poetry thing. Or the girl who can watercolour like a pro.

    6) Let's stop chasing money and stop being target focused

    Not wanting to offend, but you sound like you try so hard not to conform that you have just became a different kind of stereotype. Not conforming to society doesn't mean it isn't defining you.
    I'm not not trying to conform, I come from a very eccentric family. My dad is a chess champion who fits the stereotype of the "genius with no common sense", my mum is an artist, as are her sisters and father, a couple of my uncles are inventors and several are entrepreneurs. I was bought up in a very "unconventional" way by my ultra liberal mum and wouldn't have it any other way.
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    It might not be a good idea. Okay, they can make friends at other social areas but school means there's a routine similar to work to get used to. They also meet people who they don't have anything in common with, which is good preparation for the real world.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Why patronising?
    because you are writing off the rest of society as generic drones, and that makes you come across as completely up yourself. You are not as special as you think, and the rest of us are not as robotic as you think.


    I plan on explaining things to them. My parents always told me "question everything. If you can't see a reason why, don't do it". I was treated as a person, not patronised!
    That is obviously a good lesson to instil in your kids, however kids do not have the experience to understand the reasoning behind half the things their parents tell them to do. There were plenty of incidents I disagreed with my parents over at the time where looking back now they were obviously right.


    Instead, shouldn't we encourage people not to pick on each other about clothes?
    well yeah, but **** happens. We were encouraged not to fight, kids still fight.



    So I should have to bore myself, talking to them about their stupid parties and TOWIE instead of doing something I enjoy, which doesn't harm anyone? No. They should be taught people have different hobbies and that's okay
    Obviously they shouldn't pick on you for that, but if you don't make an effort (and if you look down on them like you obviously do) it is not a surprise if they don't particularly get on. In my school most of that cliqueyness disappeared by sixthform, as all of the different groups just stopped caring about those petty differences.



    A few off the top of my head

    1) Tattoos and piercings in the work place. What exactly is wrong with someone having pink hair and a nose ring? Or a tattoo? let's stop saying there's a proper way to look

    2) Stop the heteronormative abelist way we look at things. Would it kill kids books to have a disabled character?

    3) Let's celebrate people's differences instead of trying to fit them into a mould. Instead of saying "you need to change x" lets look at people's strengths

    4) Get rid of compulsary subjects. Making someone talented in sport do maths isn't going to make them Einstein. Let's nurture their talent

    5) Appreciate all talents. Instead of schools focusing on sports, lets also recognise the guy who won the poetry thing. Or the girl who can watercolour like a pro.

    6) Let's stop chasing money and stop being target focused
    agree with 2 and 5, and to an extent 1. 3 they already do, 4 I would say is necessary because people should have at least a minimum level of knowledge in certain, and while people should stop seeing money as an end in itself money is still necessary. And without targets nothing gets done.



    I'm not not trying to conform, I come from a very eccentric family. My dad is a chess champion who fits the stereotype of the "genius with no common sense", my mum is an artist, as are her sisters and father, a couple of my uncles are inventors and several are entrepreneurs. I was bought up in a very "unconventional" way by my ultra liberal mum and wouldn't have it any other way.
    Well that is good for you. Genuinely. Now can you stop thinking you are above the sheeple?
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    (Original post by lucaf)
    because you are writing off the rest of society as generic drones, and that makes you come across as completely up yourself. You are not as special as you think, and the rest of us are not as robotic as you think.
    I'm not saying I'm the only one. There are others who aren't like that

    That is obviously a good lesson to instil in your kids, however kids do not have the experience to understand the reasoning behind half the things their parents tell them to do. There were plenty of incidents I disagreed with my parents over at the time where looking back now they were obviously right.
    And yet it worked.I was constantly asking hy, and if it wasn't explained to me, I wouldn't do it. I used to get in trouble at school for not following instructions and my mum used to say "well what do you expect? I'm not going to apologise for bringing her up to think for herself and not blindly follow others"

    well yeah, but **** happens. We were encouraged not to fight, kids still fight.
    But that doesn't make it the fault of the person who got hit.



    Obviously they shouldn't pick on you for that, but if you don't make an effort (and if you look down on them like you obviously do) it is not a surprise if they don't particularly get on. In my school most of that cliqueyness disappeared by sixthform, as all of the different groups just stopped caring about those petty differences.
    The thing is I never wanted to be friends with them. I had no interest in it. I just wanted them to leave me alone. But the fact I didn't want to be friends with them seemed to make it worse and they seemed to be annoyed that I didn't think the sun shone out their arses.

    Yeah I found that too




    agree with 2 and 5, and to an extent 1. 3 they already do, 4 I would say is necessary because people should have at least a minimum level of knowledge in certain, and while people should stop seeing money as an end in itself money is still necessary. And without targets nothing gets done.
    Perhaps maths and english but that's it./ Also targets actually ruin efficiency. If you say "we need x percentage of students to get at least a C" and you've got a few getting a B who could get an A, and some getting a D who could get a C, you'll put more effort into those, than the others. So people lose



    Well that is good for you. Genuinely. Now can you stop thinking you are above the sheeple?
    No. Because I dislike them. I'm not saying they're all bad, but on the whole, I find a lot of "normal" people very dull. I don't really enjoy hanging around with neurotypical people for example. I find that a lot of "normal" people are nasty, shallow, and boring. They can't think for themselves, they just follow what they're told
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    (Original post by Armadillo)
    If so what benefits would this have over contemporary schooling?
    Probably PIP and ESA when they come out of homeschool with no social skills
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    I'm not against it

    I don't see how I would have time though if I had a job

    I don't believe it would harm them socially provided you took them on day trips, as well as making sure they interact with people their own age without you being there to supervise (obviously in a safe environment). To be be honest, I don't even think that school is a realistic environment for socialising, I mean on the bus, I remember one of my "friends" pulling down his pants and showing his pubic hair to some girl in one of the higher years, all kinds of stupid stuff which is clearly not acceptable.
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    If I were to have a child, and they would be deaf or autistic or both like me, then I would probably home school them if they cannot go to a special school so that they'd be in an environment where they'd be understood and receive support. From my own experiences, getting into a special school is difficult and mainstream school is very stressful. I would not want my child to have to go through what I've been through in mainstream school.
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    I was home schooled and I personally did not like it. But I live in an area where the residents don't really fraternise, also the majority of my cousins live in America so I have no one from my family that is my age here. It got pretty lonely.
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    No.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I'm not saying I'm the only one. There are others who aren't like that
    doesn't make it less insulting or more true.


    And yet it worked.I was constantly asking hy, and if it wasn't explained to me, I wouldn't do it. I used to get in trouble at school for not following instructions and my mum used to say "well what do you expect? I'm not going to apologise for bringing her up to think for herself and not blindly follow others"
    again, useful for an adult. Not for a child who doesn't know nearly as much as they think they do. It is healthy to question things, but that doesn't mean kids always get the answers.


    But that doesn't make it the fault of the person who got hit.
    Of course, but just telling kids not to hit eachother isn't going to prevent it.



    Perhaps maths and english but that's it./ Also targets actually ruin efficiency. If you say "we need x percentage of students to get at least a C" and you've got a few getting a B who could get an A, and some getting a D who could get a C, you'll put more effort into those, than the others. So people lose
    People definitely need a basic education in more than maths and english. History, RE, and sciences are the most important, or they grow up ignorant of the world and how it works. PE and art too are probably important to make sure kids try, although less critical. Only thing I don't see why we have compulsory really is languages. And fair enough misunderstood what you meant by targets.




    No. Because I dislike them. I'm not saying they're all bad, but on the whole, I find a lot of "normal" people very dull. I don't really enjoy hanging around with neurotypical people for example. I find that a lot of "normal" people are nasty, shallow, and boring. They can't think for themselves, they just follow what they're told
    What happened to it being ok for people to have different hobbies and celebrating peoples differences? :rolleyes: Fair enough if you think the things other people like are boring but then disliking them and looking down on them for it is just hypocritical, you are just as bad as the people you criticize.
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    I would do it if they hated school.
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    Nope...lack of social interaction wouldn't help them
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    Yes, but I would encourage them to join clubs and societies so they have a healthy amount of social interaction. Home schooling encourages good self study skills and allows you to pursue what you find interesting instead of the NC, is more personalised since it's one to one, and doesn't require testing in the same manner as typical school exams which I hate.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    I want to but my boyfriend doesn't.

    I don't like how schools churn out nice little drones and stamp the individuality out of people. I also don't like the bullying culture, pathetic social norms and childish games. I hated school.

    My boyfriend wants to give them the choice
    1. Not everyone who goes to school is a conforming drone, that depends far more on the person than on their upbringing. I know someone who was home-schooled who was very conforming when he came to sixth form because he didn't want to be ostracised.
    2. Not sending your child to school in case they are bullied is like not letting them cross the road in case they get hit back a car. Bullying isn't that prevalent at all.
    3. Whether you send them to school or not, everyone develops social norms, it's an overarching term. Shaking hands and saying thank you are social norms, I'm sure you've done those things before.
    4. Just because you hated school does not mean your kids will, they are different.

    It's none of my business how you raise your kids and there are some good arguments in favour of home-schooling, but I do feel some of your worries about school are unfounded.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    Perhaps maths and english but that's it.
    When would students choose what subjects they wanted to pursue, in your model?
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    No. Because I dislike them. I'm not saying they're all bad, but on the whole, I find a lot of "normal" people very dull. I don't really enjoy hanging around with neurotypical people for example. I find that a lot of "normal" people are nasty, shallow, and boring. They can't think for themselves, they just follow what they're told
    I'm yet to see you write anything original on here. Perhaps if you spent more time studying/bettering yourself (perhaps in the school->uni->PhD->professor route or through the music lessons->musician route or any other "conforming" route), you would be able to do something original.

    If you know nothing and refuse to learn from other people, it's probably hard to do anything original.
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    I think I'd like to, simply because the stuff they teach kids nowadays is disgusting, but in reality it's a lot more difficult in practice than in theory. My aunt's children are homeschooled and whilst they have no issues with social interaction, what I've noticed is that it's difficult to exercise consistency/regularity with their schooling because of a lack of things like homework or school tests. I guess homeschooling would be a real viable solution if you only planned to have one child though, that way you could really focus on the kid and tailor his/her studies to suit his/her needs.
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    It depends on the child. I don't really want children as I'm not good with them, but if I sent it to school, I would make sure its primary school was a state school, and the secondary was grammar/private.

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    No, I'm not trained to educate someone else so it's the public education systems job to educate them

    My job is to provide them with a stable upbringing, requiring money and time, no way could I do that and educate them too

    Also it's good to get away from your family a bit, they really get on your nerves if you're around the same people all of the time. And I'm not above integrating my children with other children, they should be exposed to different people as early as possible
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    (Original post by themorninglight)
    I think I'd like to, simply because the stuff they teach kids nowadays is disgusting
    I have to ask. In what way is the National Curriculum disgusting?
 
 
 
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