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    (Original post by FeelingDepressed)
    Yes but based on your parents income. If you were out on the streets or say an older student or young adult who may have been in care and self sufficient then you would be entitled to 3862 maintenance loan and 3387 maintenance grant, the issue is whether the student loan people would agree that your parents have refused to let you live at home any longer or provide any support at all and evidencing the same to the SLC. You need to speak to them.
    More gibberish.
    You describe estrangement.
    The student you reply to is NOT estranged.
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    Why don't you just tell them then that you're going to work in McDonalds and are not going to university , that's pretty independent and sensible considering the debt you're going to accumulate you by going to university ?
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    (Original post by Blaq_widow)
    Like I said, it's often the case that the maintenance loan doesn't fully cover the cost of accommodation but the excess is rarely so much that a part time job won't cover it and if that's the case, there is often cheaper accommodation available (has OP chosen the cheapest halls?).
    It's not always so simple. At my uni all accommodation was the same rate and you were obliged to live in halls in your first year. And it was expensive compared to the maintenance loan. There were special extra grants for the poorest students, but I'm quite sure these were based on parental income.

    Some people literally have no option but to find a job, not everyone can rely on their parents. What do they do? Sorry I'm not convinced the only other option is for the OP to starve on the streets, if it comes to that I'm sure they'd help but like them, I rather doubt that would be the case.
    Of course the OP should look for a job, but it's often not as easy as just walking into one. I feel like these parents who refuse to lend any support at all probably don't have a great grasp of what they're demanding their kids manage to achieve. (Disclaimer: obviously some parents can't afford to support their kids, and that's a different story. But in this case it's not clear to me why the OP can't even continue to live at home?!?)

    This whole "at 18 you're on your own" attitude seems quite arbitrary to me. Why 18? Why not 16, or 14? You can get a job at 14. Hell, you can get a job even younger than that. I hope when I will have kids I will be able to support them to do as well as they can do AND develop a good attitude.

    For the record, I'm older, and I have a good job and support myself entirely. Everything I have is paid for by me, and I know the value of hard work and budgeting. But if my parents had told me to sort my own **** out at 18, I can't say for sure I would have managed it. I'm so grateful they didn't.
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    Take a gap year/defer entry and work fully for a year.

    See if you can get any scholarships or bursays etc at your uni
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    (Original post by Jelkin)
    It's not always so simple. At my uni all accommodation was the same rate and you were obliged to live in halls in your first year. And it was expensive compared to the maintenance loan. There were special extra grants for the poorest students, but I'm quite sure these were based on parental income.
    Grants and bursaries are based on household income. Scholarships are usually based on things like academix excellence, etc.
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    Obviously, there is a discrepancy in the law. On the one and, it says that you are not entitled to anything after you are 18, on the other, they base their loan on the parents' pay. It's contradictory. You live in London, look up some lawyers on-line who give free legal advice once a week or something, and try to find out what your options are, legally speaking.
    I'd also, if I were you, would go to the uni straight ahead. If you are a student, you can go to a dean's office and explain your situation. There are people who worked in halls for free accommodation, in uni canteens, libraries, labs and such. They would be more willing to help a poor struggling student than a person who walks in from the street.
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    Is living at home an option if you pay rent? I believe you would get just under £3000 and so could pay "rent/board" of about £200/month. This would give you £50 plus your earning to cover you for transport and everything else.

    Would they or family/friends let you stay with them for nominal rent while you took a gap year to work full time save up?
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    most parents provide some support for their children but when they took the decision to have cildren fees barely existed. The sudden hike in fees has hit parents hard because they didn't budget for it. So many people struggle to help their kids and some do remortgage their homes (you dont have to sell). BUT why should they - you want to be an adult you should support yourself.

    I know of only one famiy who sent their child off with £20 - he already had the promise of bar work having taken a day trip before the start of term to look for it. I dont know who paid his fare. Having come from a privileged family he had quite a few possessions he could have sold if necessary. I know his mother has given him a few pounds now and then.

    So - sell a few possessions if necessary to get you started. Take a day trip before the start of time and try to find work before the masses arrive. Choose a bank that lets you have an overdraft. Draw up a budget to show your parents how hard it will be and ask politely if they can offer you even a few pounds a month to help. If relatives normally give you Christmas presents ask for cash or practical things like shampoo and conditioner.
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    (Original post by rana96)
    So, I'll be studying pharmacy in September 2015 and no matter where I go I'll be moving out of my parent's house. My parents' pre-tax income is somewhere around £66,000 meaning my maintenance loan will be around £3,500 a year and I'm not eligible for any grants.

    My problem is that my parents are leaving me on my own- They've promised that I'll not have a penny of support and I'm not going to be allowed to live at home. My maintenance loan won't even be enough to cover my accommodation costs and I'm not acc sure what to do about it.

    Does anybody have any advice or has anyone been in a similar situation? Is it worth contacting student finance or is there not much they can do for me?

    sorry if this doesn't deserve its own thread / belongs somewhere else, let me know. Thanks for any advice.
    I think you will get £3610...

    Anyway, you could take a year out and work, or get a part-time job at university.

    To be honest, if you are not getting any grants then SFE believes that your parents should be supporting you.
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    (Original post by rana96)
    Is there nothing student finance can do? My job atm doesn't pay much- I guess I'll have to start looking elsewhere. Thanks though
    I don't think SFE would help you, sorry, unless you were estranged from your parents.
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    (Original post by rana96)
    All my family live in another country and have their own families to worry about. Culturally it's really wrong for me to go to them for help anyways and they'd definitely contact my parents to tell them off, lmao.

    I think it's just that my parents simply can't afford to keep me at home or to fund me living away. They have a load of mortgage/car/health expenses to pay for, plus my other two siblings, and they're using this as an excuse to lessen the financial burden on themselves. They just don't want to say so because again, culturally it's pretty wrong. They don't expect me to take a gap year; in fact my mum advised against it.
    Then what the hell does she expect you to do? You can't just be expected to suffer, it's not fair on you. Many people in your situation have to take the year out to work, that's just the way it is.
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    (Original post by liass)
    Have the same problem. My parents earn around £150k and are refusing to support me through uni I want to study medicine in London, which sucks
    What??! :eek:
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    (Original post by lovali)
    Actually I'm coming at this from a position of having lived financially independent since I was 16 with only myself to rely on. Not because my parents couldn't afford to keep me. The OP isn't *****ing & moaning about how unfair life is an a spoilt brat entitled way, they're simply looking for advice about how to help themselves & where to turn to for the correct advice.

    Sounds like you're bitter that no one helped you out & you've got a chip on your shoulder about perceived rich kids & their non-existent problems. Get over yourself, just because you had to do certain things why does that mean that everyone else should have to have an unnecessarily hard time while getting an education?


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    100% agree.
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    my parents joint income is about 60000 and ive been told i wont be getting much support either! ive basically looked around for the cheapest accomodation and places that offer some kind of bursary for getting good grades- means i have to work so hard this year but will get me £2000 a year. ive also got a job at the moment so im saving up...

    people say its harsh, but where are my parents meant to find money for me to live on my own and everything? nahh its part of growing up- if i wanna make these decisions, i pay for it, seems fair!
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    (Original post by namename)
    With no degree, no prior experience, and paying a rent somewhere, going to and back from work, food, clothes, how will he be able to save 8k? That's a fairy tale.
    Companies take on students after A Levels and before University as these companies need a lot of admin work to be done, but done by people with at least half a brain. This would usually mean they'd have to pay at least £25k+ for someone to do it, but these companies have realised there are willing students who they can employ for a year to do it for less. It also feeds their graduate pipeline and gets students used to company procedures so that when they join as graduates, there is a limited transition period. They call this programme Year in Industry. You'd likely get a minimum of £17850 for the work. If you perform well, there's a good chance you'll be invited back to do internships, either another year long one or one in the summer.

    After tax and NI, you'll take home around £15k. These companies are usually in the midlands and having a bedsit like students do will cost £70/week including bills (taking Derby as an example here). Thus, one years rent is £3640. In order to save £8k at the end of it, you need to spend a maximum £70/week. As a student at University, I usually average £70/week for everything outside of rent and utilities. This includes big purchases like clothes and electronics.
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    (Original post by Like_A_G6)
    Companies take on students after A Levels and before University as these companies need a lot of admin work to be done, but done by people with at least half a brain. This would usually mean they'd have to pay at least £25k+ for someone to do it, but these companies have realised there are willing students who they can employ for a year to do it for less. It also feeds their graduate pipeline and gets students used to company procedures so that when they join as graduates, there is a limited transition period. They call this programme Year in Industry. You'd likely get a minimum of £17850 for the work. If you perform well, there's a good chance you'll be invited back to do internships, either another year long one or one in the summer.

    After tax and NI, you'll take home around £15k. These companies are usually in the midlands and having a bedsit like students do will cost £70/week including bills (taking Derby as an example here). Thus, one years rent is £3640. In order to save £8k at the end of it, you need to spend a maximum £70/week. As a student at University, I usually average £70/week for everything outside of rent and utilities. This includes big purchases like clothes and electronics.
    Can you name at least one such a company, with the job openings?
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    (Original post by rana96)
    I don't exactly know what their reasoning is, and levelling with my parents isn't exactly easy :/ it wouldn't be a problem if they earned less and I had a couple extra hundred from loans/grants lol. first world problems
    I hate to ask, but where are you from, in terms of ethinicity?

    This is ludicrous. I'd tell my parents they made me, they have the money and i'm their responsibility. It's inexcusable to do that to your children, in my eyes. You seem like a reasonable child as well...
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    Live off of your overdraft, that's what I do. It's a tough life.
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    I think sometimes parents run their mouths before the actual thing happens. Like they could threaten you with estrangement but at the end of the day, they will realise they simply cannot punish you for trying to make a better life for yourself.
    Even if they did alienate you, for parents with a conscience, that decision will haunt them for quite a while.
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    (Original post by namename)
    Can you name at least one such a company, with the job openings?
    Rolls-Royce. Whilst working there, I met with students there that were students taking a gap year before going on to University.
 
 
 

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