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    It seems like a ridiculous idea to me.

    If a certain type of person is prone to being bullied or not fitting in at school, the solution is not to just create a separate school for them. They need to learn to live in a world where bullying and ostracising of certain people exists, and how to handle it. Otherwise where does it end? Are we going to end up with separate schools for fat children, nerdy students, and ginger kids as well? All you're doing is alienating them from society and making them more of a "freak" than they were already.
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    With regards to bullying in secondary schools - there were three openly LGBT+ kids in my school. One, the gay guy, got on alright. The two girls who started dating were bullied mercilessly and constantly for three years. It meant me and my girlfriend couldn't come out, my friends couldn't come out. It wasn't worth it. We all hid ourselves through secondary school and it wasn't the most enjoyable experience. I help run the GSA at college now, and it's not exactly uncommon experience for everyone to have hated secondary school. Whether it's worse than other types of bullying, I wouldn't know, but it's definitely bad and secondary schools rarely have an resources to counter it.

    But, LGBT+ schools sound like a really, really terrible idea.

    Firstly, yeah, discrimination is not going to help and you have just been outed to every future employer ever. Segregation does not solve the problem at all. It's a terrible solution, there will still be millions of queer kids in non-LGBT schools having to put up with homophobic and transphobic bullying. I'd also make the point that the article seems very focused on homophobic bullying, when lets be real, trans kids have it just as bad if not far worse at secondary school, especially if they even considered transitioning whilst there. There's a reason every trans kid I know started transition in the summer between secondary school and college, or at college.

    I'd prefer integration into society than segregation from it, personally. That doesn't mean not challenging the status quo a bit, but seperatism has never been a very appealing ideology.

    What is an idea I prefer, and I've seen in some American universities, is offering a 'rainbow floor' in some accomodation blocks for LGBT+ people. If you've got a big enough university, fostering community and allowing a lot of people, especially trans people, to live in a safer environment sounds like a good idea to me. Of course, universities here don't tend to have much of a problem, but I'm sure at least some of us get paired with homo/trans/etcphobic tossers in first year.
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    Sex education classes would be interesting
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    (Original post by Das Auto)
    To suggest homophobic bullying is ingrained in the education system is wrong. It is not.
    It absolutely is. Do you have no experience of the education system? Or were you privately educated?

    http://www.stonewall.org.uk/document...rt_2012(2).pdf

    "Homophobic bullying continues to be widespread in Britain’s schools. More than half (55 per cent) of lesbian, gay and bisexual pupils have experienced direct bullying

    The use of homophobic language is endemic. Almost all (99 per cent) gay young people hear the phrases ‘that’s so gay’ or ‘you’re so gay’ in school and ninety six per cent of gay pupils hear homophobic language such as ‘poof’ or ‘lezza’

    Three in five gay pupils who experience homophobic bullying say that teachers who witness the bullying never intervene

    Only half of gay pupils report that their schools say homophobic bullying is wrong, even fewer do in faith schools (37 per cent)

    Homophobic bullying has a profoundly damaging impact on young people’s school experience. One in three (32 per cent) gay pupils experiencing bullying change their future educational plans because of it and three in five say it impacts directly on their school work

    Gay people who are bullied are at a higher risk of suicide, self-harm and depression. Two in five (41 per cent) have attempted or thought about taking their own life directly because of bullying and the same number say that they deliberately self-harm directly because of bullying"


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    (Original post by EmilyKvothe)
    With regards to bullying in secondary schools - there were three openly LGBT+ kids in my school. One, the gay guy, got on alright. The two girls who started dating were bullied mercilessly and constantly for three years. It meant me and my girlfriend couldn't come out, my friends couldn't come out. It wasn't worth it. We all hid ourselves through secondary school and it wasn't the most enjoyable experience. I help run the GSA at college now, and it's not exactly uncommon experience for everyone to have hated secondary school. Whether it's worse than other types of bullying, I wouldn't know, but it's definitely bad and secondary schools rarely have an resources to counter it.

    But, LGBT+ schools sound like a really, really terrible idea.

    Firstly, yeah, discrimination is not going to help and you have just been outed to every future employer ever. Segregation does not solve the problem at all. It's a terrible solution, there will still be millions of queer kids in non-LGBT schools having to put up with homophobic and transphobic bullying. I'd also make the point that the article seems very focused on homophobic bullying, when lets be real, trans kids have it just as bad if not far worse at secondary school, especially if they even considered transitioning whilst there. There's a reason every trans kid I know started transition in the summer between secondary school and college, or at college.

    I'd prefer integration into society than segregation from it, personally. That doesn't mean not challenging the status quo a bit, but seperatism has never been a very appealing ideology.

    What is an idea I prefer, and I've seen in some American universities, is offering a 'rainbow floor' in some accomodation blocks for LGBT+ people. If you've got a big enough university, fostering community and allowing a lot of people, especially trans people, to live in a safer environment sounds like a good idea to me. Of course, universities here don't tend to have much of a problem, but I'm sure at least some of us get paired with homo/trans/etcphobic tossers in first year.
    I hate the rainbow floor idea! It implies that LGBT people are so different from others that they need to live together. Nobody I know at university has ever experienced any negative comments towards their sexuality. I think having a separate living space for gay people would turn their sexualities into something they're not. Who would want their living arrangements dictated by who they're attracted to?!


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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    It seems like a ridiculous idea to me.

    If a certain type of person is prone to being bullied or not fitting in at school, the solution is not to just create a separate school for them. They need to learn to live in a world where bullying and ostracising of certain people exists, and how to handle it. Otherwise where does it end? Are we going to end up with separate schools for fat children, nerdy students, and ginger kids as well? All you're doing is alienating them from society and making them more of a "freak" than they were already.
    No, they don't need to "learn" to put up with horrific, humiliating abuse. That's not a normal part of society. They need to have teachers who will always stand up for them and heavily discipline the abusers.


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    I'm all for LGBT rights and equality but I don't agree with this. We should be looking to change the attitudes of society towards the LGBT community, not just giving them their own school.
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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    It seems like a ridiculous idea to me.

    If a certain type of person is prone to being bullied or not fitting in at school, the solution is not to just create a separate school for them. They need to learn to live in a world where bullying and ostracising of certain people exists, and how to handle it. Otherwise where does it end? Are we going to end up with separate schools for fat children, nerdy students, and ginger kids as well? All you're doing is alienating them from society and making them more of a "freak" than they were already.
    .....More of a freak?
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    Yes let's integrate the LGBT society by giving it separate schools from the rest of the population :yep:

    Great idea.

    /sarcasm
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    I understand how this could be seen as a solution, however, I think that this will increase the isolation and make the LGBT community feel separated from society. Instead there should be a higher emphasis on educating students about LGBT. It should be enforced in schools that any bullying because of a persons sexual orientation or gender will not be tolerated and educate students so they understand about the LGBT community. Personally I think a separate school will further separate us from society and make us feel like outcast even more and frightened to integrate into society when we leave school.
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    This is so wrong, LGBT people are NORMAL people and by giving them their own school its like saying they're not! We don't need any more segregation, everybody is the same no matter what and dividing them like that is just completely wrong.
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    so if bullying is the problem why should only lgbtq people get a new school. what about when they bully each other? because gays aren't magically better people than others.

    top be honest bullying is a natural part of growing up. if you can't deal with it, you can't deal with life, simple as.
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    In reality gay people live in a world full of straight people. Most my friends are straight and I see no difference between us so I don't think we should be in different schools.
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    No, I personally don't think they should. It could give them a false sense of security, especially in the world we live in. As much as I hate bullies and think we shouldn't be judged or ridiculed for our sexuality, ethnicity or mental state purposely excluding these kids from others will be worse as it'll be a huge shock for them. Instead, we should look at tackling bullying in schools
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    I don't think it's a great idea, it would be better to have an LGBT support team or club within the same school but to separate them in different schools would only separate them further from society, it's not like they have a disability and can't learn for god sake, how about a school for bullies to learn some darn respect. Boils my blood this.
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    (Original post by AspiringMedic8)
    No, they don't need to "learn" to put up with horrific, humiliating abuse. That's not a normal part of society. They need to have teachers who will always stand up for them and heavily discipline the abusers.


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    I think they also need to be able to stand up for themselves. Problems like this need to be faces and solved, not run away from.
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    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    .....More of a freak?
    As far as their bullies are concerned, yes. It's one thing to have some quirk that makes you a bit different, and another thing to be secluded from everyone else altogether. Such schools would just reinforce the idea that they don't belong amongst normal society.
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    Yeah, well it kind of seems like that'd be almost ghetto-ising LGBTAQ people. And besides, why would they decide to choose to separate them from the rest of society if they felt it was to "protect them" anyway? There are many, many people getting bullied for whatever reason, but why single them out? Why not have separate schools for blacks, gingers, mixed race, geeks, etc, would be the logic of the public at large. All it would really do would be to create a separateness and an us-and-them mentality. Hell, most people in that situation would probably never even meet a gay person until at least uni.
    Besides, the expenses for this when the education system is already kinda strapped for cash would be insane, really. You'd basically be doubling the amount of teachers needed, the land needed, and the textbooks and things needed.
    Finally, people don't even generally realise that they're LGBTAQ until at least their teens. Would they really want to be separated from their friends, teachers and their general life, even if they were being bullied?
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    (Original post by KingStannis)
    so if bullying is the problem why should only lgbtq people get a new school. what about when they bully each other? because gays aren't magically better people than others.

    top be honest bullying is a natural part of growing up. if you can't deal with it, you can't deal with life, simple as.
    So having your trousers torn down in front of your full PE class because you're gay is a normal part of growing up?


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    (Original post by tazarooni89)
    I think they also need to be able to stand up for themselves. Problems like this need to be faces and solved, not run away from.
    No, they need to teach people that being homophobic is not okay and kick out the bullying ********s. How can one person stand up against a full crowd of people who humiliate them?


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