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How do you feel about the 'Fat Acceptance' movement? watch

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    I think there is a fine line between fat acceptance and body positivity.

    I think a lot of overweight people think that both are the same thing, but they're not. In my opinion I don't think we should promote fat acceptance just as I don't think we should accept the 'thigh gap' campaign. If anything body positivity should be promoted more, as if you're positive with you body, you'll be able to realize what is best for it ie eating healthier, exercising.

    With that said losing weight isn't simple. I myself I have lost a lot over the,past few years and it has been hard! A lot of overweight people will carry a lot of emotional baggage from their past ie bullying, family problems. Hence why when people say we shouldn't sugarcoat it, I think that may be one of the problems in obesity. Psychological and emotional factors play a heavy part (no pun intended) in obesity.

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    (Original post by Motorbiker)
    It's actually a large percentage of the NHSs costs and increasing every year.

    And those are topics for other debates you're free to start separate threads on.
    Actually the biggest amount spent by the NHS is on the elderly.

    An obese person doesn't live until they are elderly, so over the course of their lifetime saves the NHS money by dying early. No need for special mobility equipment, social care, arthritis/heart/Parkinson's/dementia treatment etc.

    I like the fat acceptance movement. Being a bit fat (I'm not talking morbidly obese here) Has actually been linked to living llonger. Let's face it, most of us skinny people don't exactly take the best care of our health - I drink and don't excercise. A lot of fat people are probably a damn site fitter than I am.

    It must be **** being fat, if it means people feel comfortable in their own skin that can only be good. And I'll probably appreciate it when my metabolism slows and I balloon outward.
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    (Original post by Octohedral)
    I mean no disrespect, and I have a lot of respect for you for sticking to a rigid plan. However, I am speaking from experience. I lost 4 stone last year, going from obese (15.5st) to normal (11.5st). I have kept it off for a year now.

    I can understand that it feels impossible when you don't see results. I went through many years of trying to lose weight, but I always ended up binge eating, and then nothing happened, and I thought it was impossible.

    The way I eventually did it was through a mixture of intermittent fasting and running. I did the couch to 5k, then ran for 20 minutes three times a week, and have done ever since. This is minimal as far as exercise is concerned, but it was enough to keep my appetite down.

    I don't recommend intermittent fasting for you, as you are working so hard to eat healthily (fasting has been shown to have some health benefits, but I don't want to screw up whatever you're doing, because it sounds like you are on the right track, and the last thing you want to do is yo-yo diet).

    In my case, I found the right approach was not to be too strict. I never denied myself junk food, but I tried to go several days a week without eating it. Not eating for a while actually shrank my appetite, and eating healthily got rid of my junk food cravings. These are 90% psychological - comfort eating etc. There are some delicious, nutritional meals you can make that satisfy you.

    I'm not trivialising it, but I think a lot of people feel it is a lot harder than it is, either because they don't see results early enough or because they try diets where they can't even have the occasional chocolate bar, or because they don't do enough exercise and try to do it through diet alone. Exercise doesn't burn many calories, but raises your general sense of health and wellbeing, and stops you craving rubbish. I strongly recommend running outside, not on a treadmill.

    Good luck to you, anyway. As above, I have a lot of respect for you doing it.
    I considered fasting after watching a documentary on Netflix about it, but the main reason I chose to take action now is that later this year I'm embarking on a long-range hike in the Australian Alps, and after consulting with a personal trainer I'm on a high protein diet, and along with the fitness plan, my training is tailored to that - losing weight is almost a (good!) side effect really.
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    Fat acceptance is incomprehensibly ridiculous. Being slightly overweight is fine (my standard of overweight probably differs from the NHS) but when I see people who's weight is clearly a health problem it disgusts me. Not only are you creating an eyesore, you cost the NHS a fortune and when they have children they just set them up for a life of being fat. Everyone is so quick to jump on smokers but yet so happy to mollycoddle fat people. I accept some people truly aren't responsible for being overweight but that's such a small minority of cases it's almost not even worth mentioning


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    (Original post by askew116)
    I considered fasting after watching a documentary on Netflix about it, but the main reason I chose to take action now is that later this year I'm embarking on a long-range hike in the Australian Alps, and after consulting with a personal trainer I'm on a high protein diet, and along with the fitness plan, my training is tailored to that - losing weight is almost a (good!) side effect really.
    Wow! Good luck with that!

    Yeah, fasting will help you lose weight (and you actually feel really good), but there's no way it will prepare you for long range hiking I'll amend my statement: "losing weight is easy if that's your only goal, but losing weight whilst putting on muscle is hard".
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    Can't get my head around it, ultimately being fat is not good for you or anybody else, it costs the country money due to unnecessary pressure on health services etc. I would rather this money could go into improving mental health provision, for example.

    Obesity is completely avoidable for the vast majority of people, I cannot understand why you would want to let yourself get into that state, it makes everything in life more difficult.
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    I think people need to be educated about the dangers of being overweight and how to make positive changes. I do not however think fat shaming is acceptable.


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    Fat Acceptance:

    If you're saying "hey - sit on the sofa all day and eat junk food" then no, that will not lead to health. For anyone - regardless of weight.

    If you're saying "let's stop bashing fat people, making assumptions about them and proffering our (often negative) opinions about them" then it's a good thing.

    Nobody deserves to be bullied. But bullying can take other forms - "I'm just worried about your health", however well-meaning, can backfire. Not sure what to do? Easy!

    1. Don't make any assumptions about someone's health based on their body size.
    2. Don't offer your opinion unless it's asked for.

    A drain on the NHS? The illnesses correlated with obesity can be very serious - heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure et al can actually affect "normal weight" people too. But these all respond well to exercise.

    So - this leads up to should we not be encouraging and promoting healthy eating and exercise for all? Of course! Where the fat acceptance movement is vital there is in stopping the bullying. Laughing at the fat person. Pointing at them, offering your opinions on what they can do when you've not been asked. If you can treat a fat person exercising with respect, the same way you would a "normal weight" person exercising then that's great.

    We all need to eat right and exercise. Your weight matters less than how many healthy behaviours you engage in. If you want to be healthy, then don't smoke, don't overeat, don't drink alcohol to excess, keep junk food to a minimum, exercise regularly and manage your stress levels. I know this is going to come as a shock to many, but there ARE fat people who actually live like this. They are the one who have ignored the haters. The ones who haven't - well they've locked themselves away seeking comfort from a hating world of Katie Hopkins types who are the ones who should be truly ashamed of how their rude opinions are having a negative impact on mental health.

    How many "normal weight" people can claim to not smoke, not over indulge with alcohol, eat right, exercise regularly and keep stress levels in check? Not easy to do, and to those who do - good on ya!
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    (Original post by Janty)
    Fat Acceptance:


    1. Don't make any assumptions about someone's health based on their body size.
    2. Don't offer your opinion unless it's asked for.

    A drain on the NHS? The illnesses correlated with obesity can be very serious - heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure et al can actually affect "normal weight" people too. But these all respond well to exercise.
    Completely 100% disagree with 1.

    If you're 25 stone I can damn well make a giant list of assumptions about your health since humans are not designed to be that size. Our organs and joints are not going to cope.

    And the list of illnesses you give correlated with, and often caused by, obesity should mean that you do offer your opinion to the fat people you love.
 
 
 
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