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    (Original post by cifrinable)
    What do you mean? Do you mean Colleges will be kinder with late rent or something?
    You don't have to pay everything upfront. This is a despicable practice.


    (Original post by cifrinable)
    Ah. The big scholarship at Durham I applied for never actually told me whether I'd been awarded it or not? Or when you say Tuesday do you mean it has been confirmed?
    What's your scholarship? Mine is the AHRC and there are only 15-20 awards in the Arts for UK-EU students and the results are announced on Tuesday. :cry2:
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    Departmental ones. AHRC prep masters scholarships are even rarer than PhD ones so I wasn't even waiting - I think humanities at Durham allocate 1 or 2 per year across some 800
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    (Original post by cifrinable)
    Departmental ones. AHRC prep masters scholarships are even rarer than PhD ones so I wasn't even waiting - I think humanities at Durham allocate 1 or 2 per year across some 800
    There are 10 MA scholarships, is that right?
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    Hey guys, I'm from Malaysia and I will be starting my MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Durham this October. Have been accepted at Hild Bede.

    I'm still on the fence about college accommodation vs living out. I've been spending (far too many) hours looking at available rooms to rent; not quite sure whether the best ones are already taken by now, or it is in fact still a bit early to look for rooms at this point. I'm looking at getting the cheapest (but sensible) rooms at Claypath or Elvet, coz that will be between Hild Bede and the lecture halls and the shops, but I'm not sure that it makes sense to find what looks like a good place just based on photos and some emails with the landlord and to sign a contract without having visited it (I won't arrive at Durham till late Sept at the earliest), in which case I may just be forced to choose college accommodation for the simplicity of it. But I'm looking to see what other plans people have regarding accommodation.
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    got my offer today, finally! Probably will live on campus, purely because I cannot bear the thought of living alone!
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    Hi everyone!

    We are so thrilled to see so many postgrads looking at coming to Durham - it really is a great city.

    I see a lot of you have accommodation questions, and maybe we can help with that! Its always a difficult decision whether to go in to college accommodation or find your own. We run a private halls accommodation site which works as a really good hybrid between the two options, with a mixture of shared flats (all rooms en-suite) and studios. Here are some advantages of living with us.

    1. You dont have to move out over the holidays (including the summer if you chose to stay living with us)
    2. You still get that student experience of living with other like minded people but without the hassle of college.
    3. There are social spaces on site so you can take a break from studying when it suits you.
    4. Our prices are equal (if not cheaper) that college accommodation - and include all your bills.
    5. We have super fast WiFi across the whole site.
    6. An on site management and maintenance team to help you out whenever you need it.

    There are a host of other great things as well - but its going to sound like I am bragging! If you would like any more infomation about us and what we offer our students then head over to our website or chat with us on Facebook or Twitter.

    Hope this helps, and we can't wait to see some of you in Durham next year!

    Rachel
    Universal Student Living Team
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    I recieved my offer so I can now apply for colleges, however I also hold another offer for Warwick who will let me know if I have secured funding on the 8th April, Durham will let me know on the 30th April. Since Durham is my preferred choice, although it ultimately comes down to funding, should I just go on and accept my offer so I can get accommodation at a college sorted? If Durham doesn't give me the funding and I have to withdraw, will I be able to at that point? I know I have to pay a deposit for accommodation but I am hoping that by that point I will know of the funding outcome.
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    You can accept your offer at Durham but request for deferment of payment of deposit, if you explain the situation that you are waiting for decision about funding later this month. Acceptance of the offer at Durham isn't binding; you can pull out later if it comes to that.

    Don't have to be rushed about getting accommodation at a college sorted. Once you accepted Durham's offer and they send you an email about your college preference, you have one month from the date of that email to reply (after which they will allocate a college for you). You're supposed to pay a deposit for accommodation if you want it guaranteed, but the final deadline for that is June. You still have time.
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    (Original post by mcgarmott)
    Hey guys, I'm from Malaysia and I will be starting my MA in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Durham this October. Have been accepted at Hild Bede.

    I'm still on the fence about college accommodation vs living out. I've been spending (far too many) hours looking at available rooms to rent; not quite sure whether the best ones are already taken by now, or it is in fact still a bit early to look for rooms at this point. I'm looking at getting the cheapest (but sensible) rooms at Claypath or Elvet, coz that will be between Hild Bede and the lecture halls and the shops, but I'm not sure that it makes sense to find what looks like a good place just based on photos and some emails with the landlord and to sign a contract without having visited it (I won't arrive at Durham till late Sept at the earliest), in which case I may just be forced to choose college accommodation for the simplicity of it. But I'm looking to see what other plans people have regarding accommodation.
    Hi ,

    I'm currently in the MA Medieval and Early Modern Studiesprogramme, and I have several friends in Hilde Bede. Places to live are definitely already starting to fill up, so I would suggesting finding something for yourself as soon as possible. I am also an international student so I was in a similar situation last year, and I ended up renting a place I hadn't seen (I actually didn't even have pictures of it) after finding it on sturents.comand Skyping with the landlord. It all worked out well for me and I love the place I'm in. I'm not sure if my landlord has any units left, but search for "Jaggers" on sturents.comif you're interested. The studio and one bed flats aren't cheap, but the cost is lower if you're considering a room in a shared place. Otherwise I would suggest finding a place you like the look of, talking to the landlord, and then emailing the Student Union. They can look over the contract for you and let you know if this is a landlord that they're familiar with, and if they're trustworthy. Nothing beats seeing the place in person before you agree to take it, but if that's not possible I think checking out what the Student Union has to say about it is a good plan. Good luck! And feel free to message me if you have any questions about the MA!
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    (Original post by JJasper)
    Hi ,

    I'm currently in the MA Medieval and Early Modern Studiesprogramme, and I have several friends in Hilde Bede. Places to live are definitely already starting to fill up, so I would suggesting finding something for yourself as soon as possible. I am also an international student so I was in a similar situation last year, and I ended up renting a place I hadn't seen (I actually didn't even have pictures of it) after finding it on sturents.comand Skyping with the landlord. It all worked out well for me and I love the place I'm in. I'm not sure if my landlord has any units left, but search for "Jaggers" on sturents.comif you're interested. The studio and one bed flats aren't cheap, but the cost is lower if you're considering a room in a shared place. Otherwise I would suggest finding a place you like the look of, talking to the landlord, and then emailing the Student Union. They can look over the contract for you and let you know if this is a landlord that they're familiar with, and if they're trustworthy. Nothing beats seeing the place in person before you agree to take it, but if that's not possible I think checking out what the Student Union has to say about it is a good plan. Good luck! And feel free to message me if you have any questions about the MA!
    Did you have to pay the whole rent upfront?
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Did you have to pay the whole rent upfront?
    No definitely not. I paid a deposit up front which is about a months rent, but so long as you leave things in good condition you should get that back when your tenancy is up. Other than that I just pay monthly at the beginning of the month. Do keep in mind though that as an international student, setting up a bank account when you first get here takes a little bit of time and though I hesitate to use the word hassle, it takes some work. So for your first month you may need to find a way to transfer the money internationally to your landlord, and though it's not a good idea to travel with a lot of cash, you'll need to think about how to have a bit of money with you when you first get here to hold you over until the account is set up.
    It was a bit more difficult for me because I arrived a month before term began and you need a letter from your college to set up a bank account, a letter which they don't tend to give until term starts. It worked out in the end, but getting the letter and setting up a meeting with the bank etc. took some time.
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    (Original post by JJasper)
    No definitely not. I paid a deposit up front which is about a months rent, but so long as you leave things in good condition you should get that back when your tenancy is up. Other than that I just pay monthly at the beginning of the month. Do keep in mind though that as an international student, setting up a bank account when you first get here takes a little bit of time and though I hesitate to use the word hassle, it takes some work. So for your first month you may need to find a way to transfer the money internationally to your landlord, and though it's not a good idea to travel with a lot of cash, you'll need to think about how to have a bit of money with you when you first get here to hold you over until the account is set up.
    It was a bit more difficult for me because I arrived a month before term began and you need a letter from your college to set up a bank account, a letter which they don't tend to give until term starts. It worked out in the end, but getting the letter and setting up a meeting with the bank etc. took some time.
    Thanks!
    It's just that I've seen everywhere that landlords ask to pay everything upfront without a UK guarantor. Glad to see we can negotiate.
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    (Original post by JJasper)
    Hi ,

    I'm currently in the MA Medieval and Early Modern Studiesprogramme, and I have several friends in Hilde Bede. Places to live are definitely already starting to fill up, so I would suggesting finding something for yourself as soon as possible. I am also an international student so I was in a similar situation last year, and I ended up renting a place I hadn't seen (I actually didn't even have pictures of it) after finding it on sturents.comand Skyping with the landlord. It all worked out well for me and I love the place I'm in. I'm not sure if my landlord has any units left, but search for "Jaggers" on sturents.comif you're interested. The studio and one bed flats aren't cheap, but the cost is lower if you're considering a room in a shared place. Otherwise I would suggest finding a place you like the look of, talking to the landlord, and then emailing the Student Union. They can look over the contract for you and let you know if this is a landlord that they're familiar with, and if they're trustworthy. Nothing beats seeing the place in person before you agree to take it, but if that's not possible I think checking out what the Student Union has to say about it is a good plan. Good luck! And feel free to message me if you have any questions about the MA!
    Hey man, thanks so much for that info. I was asking one of the rental agencies who informed me that their busy period was November to January, i.e. that's when the undergrad students are searching for and locking down their accommodation out of college. So from there I understood that postgrads coming in to Durham as a first-year are inevitably at a disadvantage.

    Where are you currently staying at the moment? I've enquired about a bunch of properties – about half didn't reply though – but I did see one on Claypath that seems almost ideal; good proximity to both college and department (I assume that's at Elvet Riverside?), cost ain't too high, looks decent in photographs, shops galore nearby. Claypath wouldn't be a noisy place to be, would it?

    For your friends at Hild Bede, are any of them living in college halls? If yes, what are their opinions about it?

    Questions about MA: did you find the course demanding? How many students are there in your batch?
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    (Original post by mcgarmott)
    Hey man, thanks so much for that info. I was asking one of the rental agencies who informed me that their busy period was November to January, i.e. that's when the undergrad students are searching for and locking down their accommodation out of college. So from there I understood that postgrads coming in to Durham as a first-year are inevitably at a disadvantage.

    Where are you currently staying at the moment? I've enquired about a bunch of properties – about half didn't reply though – but I did see one on Claypath that seems almost ideal; good proximity to both college and department (I assume that's at Elvet Riverside?), cost ain't too high, looks decent in photographs, shops galore nearby. Claypath wouldn't be a noisy place to be, would it?

    For your friends at Hild Bede, are any of them living in college halls? If yes, what are their opinions about it?

    Questions about MA: did you find the course demanding? How many students are there in your batch?
    In my experience larger rental companies who have offices in many different cities tend not to email back, they would usually expect you to call them or go in and see them which is obviously hard for international students. I'm staying in the Elvet area at the moment, it's a great location but it can be pretty noisy. Then again that depends on the individual flat, how sound proof it is, how close it is to the road etc. I don't know from experience but I would guess that Claypath would be a bit quieter. I know a couple of people in halls at Hild Bede and they seem to like it. As far as halls go I think it sounds pretty normal. I think the postgraduate accommodation is quite close to the college and campus so that's good, whereas the University College (my college) postgrad accommodation is a good 30 minute walk outside of town. The only problem one of my friends had is that she was told she could self-cater at the Hild Bede postgrad site and for some reason it turns out that she couldn't, so she has to walk to the actual college for all of her meals. I'm not sure if that's the same for everyone or if her situation is unique.

    Is the MA demanding, I would say yes and no. It is demanding in that obviously a higher quality of work is expected of you than what you might be used to in undergraduate study, but that goes for any postgraduate course. So it does challenge you. In the first term though, I had pretty much nothing to do other than do readings and go to class. We had no assignments due until January. That would be different if you enrolled for any optional modules in first term, but the ones I chose were all second term. We also were not given clear guidance of what we were to do for our assignments until maybe a month and a half (depending on the assignment) before they were due, so it was pretty hard to get a head start on anything. The result is that I have pretty much everything other than my dissertation due between mid March and mid May. That's been pretty stressful, and a lot of work. It's doable, but not so fun. I would have liked to spread the work out more evenly.

    Since it's a taught programme there's no requirement for you to have chosen a dissertation topic before you arrive, and I didn't. Looking back I wish I had, or that I had at least a good idea of what I might like to do. Even though it's not a requirement, once I arrived it was sort of expected that I would have a plan for my dissertation and I didn't. As a result I was really rushing around trying to come up with something, and that's not fun. So I would suggest giving it some serious thought before you arrive if you haven't already. Oh! And there are currently 10 students on the programme. One of them is doing it part time over two years, so I guess you'll see him around next year.
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    (Original post by JJasper)
    In my experience larger rental companies who have offices in many different cities tend not to email back, they would usually expect you to call them or go in and see them which is obviously hard for international students. I'm staying in the Elvet area at the moment, it's a great location but it can be pretty noisy. Then again that depends on the individual flat, how sound proof it is, how close it is to the road etc. I don't know from experience but I would guess that Claypath would be a bit quieter. I know a couple of people in halls at Hild Bede and they seem to like it. As far as halls go I think it sounds pretty normal. I think the postgraduate accommodation is quite close to the college and campus so that's good, whereas the University College (my college) postgrad accommodation is a good 30 minute walk outside of town. The only problem one of my friends had is that she was told she could self-cater at the Hild Bede postgrad site and for some reason it turns out that she couldn't, so she has to walk to the actual college for all of her meals. I'm not sure if that's the same for everyone or if her situation is unique.

    Is the MA demanding, I would say yes and no. It is demanding in that obviously a higher quality of work is expected of you than what you might be used to in undergraduate study, but that goes for any postgraduate course. So it does challenge you. In the first term though, I had pretty much nothing to do other than do readings and go to class. We had no assignments due until January. That would be different if you enrolled for any optional modules in first term, but the ones I chose were all second term. We also were not given clear guidance of what we were to do for our assignments until maybe a month and a half (depending on the assignment) before they were due, so it was pretty hard to get a head start on anything. The result is that I have pretty much everything other than my dissertation due between mid March and mid May. That's been pretty stressful, and a lot of work. It's doable, but not so fun. I would have liked to spread the work out more evenly.

    Since it's a taught programme there's no requirement for you to have chosen a dissertation topic before you arrive, and I didn't. Looking back I wish I had, or that I had at least a good idea of what I might like to do. Even though it's not a requirement, once I arrived it was sort of expected that I would have a plan for my dissertation and I didn't. As a result I was really rushing around trying to come up with something, and that's not fun. So I would suggest giving it some serious thought before you arrive if you haven't already. Oh! And there are currently 10 students on the programme. One of them is doing it part time over two years, so I guess you'll see him around next year.
    Thanks, that's good to know. I asked one of the Hild Bede students about what he heard from postgrad students there and he said the comments ranged from 'it is okay' to 'it looks as austere as a prison', haha.

    As for your friend, what I understand about Hild Bede is that everyone who stays in college is catered; there is generally no self-catering option there. However, the majority of HB postgrads would be allocated halls that have at least a basic kitchen, because catering does not extend beyond term time and postgrads are on 50-week lets.

    Question: have you heard of horror stories from fellow international postgrad students where they arrived at Durham only to find that their room and/or living areas aren't what they expected?

    I guess that gives me an idea about the workload: pretty much what one would expect from a typical postgrad course. It'll probably be just a tad more work for me, as I would be coming into the degree with no background in history, let alone the medieval period. (It's just an area of interest that I've been cultivating in recent years; up till now I work in the media industry.) Good tip about having ideas for a dissertation topic early, will definitely keep that in mind.

    May I ask what optional modules are you taking and what is your opinion about them? (Hope I'm not peppering you with too many questions!)
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    (Original post by mcgarmott)
    Thanks, that's good to know. I asked one of the Hild Bede students about what he heard from postgrad students there and he said the comments ranged from 'it is okay' to 'it looks as austere as a prison', haha.

    As for your friend, what I understand about Hild Bede is that everyone who stays in college is catered; there is generally no self-catering option there. However, the majority of HB postgrads would be allocated halls that have at least a basic kitchen, because catering does not extend beyond term time and postgrads are on 50-week lets.

    Question: have you heard of horror stories from fellow international postgrad students where they arrived at Durham only to find that their room and/or living areas aren't what they expected?

    I guess that gives me an idea about the workload: pretty much what one would expect from a typical postgrad course. It'll probably be just a tad more work for me, as I would be coming into the degree with no background in history, let alone the medieval period. (It's just an area of interest that I've been cultivating in recent years; up till now I work in the media industry.) Good tip about having ideas for a dissertation topic early, will definitely keep that in mind.

    May I ask what optional modules are you taking and what is your opinion about them? (Hope I'm not peppering you with too many questions!)
    I haven't heard any horror stories, I know a couple of people who were a bit disappointed with their college accommodation when they arrived but they're in my college and they seemed to get over it once they actually got to know the people they were living with. I think it was mostly to do with the distance between the accommodation and the city, but I don't think that would be a problem at Hild Bede. Halls are halls - they're never going to be particularly aesthetically pleasing or spacious but they are convenient.

    I did the Palaeography module and another one in the history department called "Negotiating life in the early modern period". I would recommend both if they suit your interest. Palaeography was just amazing, to be honest. Richard Gameson is a genius, and he's hilarious and friendly as well. It's not even THAT difficult, so long as you attend the sessions and take in what he's telling you. The collections that we got to work with were amazing. There's nothing like looking through several manuscripts worth millions of pounds every Friday afternoon to get you excited. The summative assignment was admittedly more work than I thought it would be, but again it's not that it's difficult, just requires a good chunk of time and a lot of attention detail. I would definitely recommend that course to anyone. It runs in first and second term so it covers samples from antiquity to the early modern period. There's something in it for everyone.
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    (Original post by JJasper)
    I did the Palaeography module and another one in the history department called "Negotiating life in the early modern period". I would recommend both if they suit your interest. Palaeography was just amazing, to be honest. Richard Gameson is a genius, and he's hilarious and friendly as well. It's not even THAT difficult, so long as you attend the sessions and take in what he's telling you. The collections that we got to work with were amazing. There's nothing like looking through several manuscripts worth millions of pounds every Friday afternoon to get you excited. The summative assignment was admittedly more work than I thought it would be, but again it's not that it's difficult, just requires a good chunk of time and a lot of attention detail. I would definitely recommend that course to anyone. It runs in first and second term so it covers samples from antiquity to the early modern period. There's something in it for everyone.
    That's great. I'm definitely interested in the Palaeography module. A thought just occurred to me though ... How many of the modules seen here are actually offered in your year?

    https://www.dur.ac.uk/mlac/postgradu...rs/optmodules/
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    Hey! My name's Olivia, I'm 24, from yhe US and entering the MA of Medieval and Early Modern History 2015! Just hoping tp connect with some other post grads before I head over!
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    (Original post by oliviamalona)
    Hey! My name's Olivia, I'm 24, from yhe US and entering the MA of Medieval and Early Modern History 2015! Just hoping tp connect with some other post grads before I head over!
    Hello, join the club!
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    (Original post by mcgarmott)
    That's great. I'm definitely interested in the Palaeography module. A thought just occurred to me though ... How many of the modules seen here are actually offered in your year?

    https://www.dur.ac.uk/mlac/postgradu...rs/optmodules/
    I'm not sure about all of them as we didn't really get a definitive list at the first of the year, we sort of just went off of this and asked individually about the courses we were interested in and hoped they were running. Two that I was interested in were not.
    The first two on the list aren't exactly running because that professor is on sabbatical I think, but there are two similar courses taught by another professor that are running. In know for sure that the following are running:
    Anglo Saxon, Palaeography, Power and Society, Renaissance Humanism, and Negotiating Life. Courts and Power didn't run due to lack of interest (I was interested! I guess no one else was). So far as I am aware, Worship and Reform is no longer being offered.

    I don't think History of the Book ran this year, and I think the Wealth of Nations course did. The other ones I'm not sure about.
    This is largely filtered through my interests though, since I'm focused on the early modern period I haven't necessarily paid that much attention to whether or not the medieval modules are running. I just know about them through friends.
    This list really should be updated. I had planned to take both Worship and Reform and Courts and Power only to find out after the first week that they weren't running so had to come up with a new plan. I would say just be prepared for the fact that several of these probably won't be offered.
 
 
 
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