I'm in mid 20s, did arts degree became a teacher, don't like it, what else can I do? Watch

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(Original post by thisistheend)
Again, ceterus paribus is implied. Also, I doubt she choose Philosophy because she wanted to do Physiotherapy at 18 years of age, that's a very odd way of attributing motivations. She probably decided on that later.
That's my point. She only knows what she wants to be now, it's not philosophy's fault that she wants to go into the healthcare profession as a graduate which is completely unrelated; it's simply the result of her not knowing what she wanted to be in life. I mean, look at the post above: she's talking about being a member of societies, attending seminars, being a teaching assistant, submitting (not publishing) papers and working a part-time job! Graduate employers do not care about any of that, it's what every single student does and none of it is impressive. Having teaching assistant experience on your application would actually harm your chances. They want to see a strong concentration on their area of work, i.e. not just a dabble of this and that but a clear demonstration that this candidate has been focusing their efforts on getting into THEIR firm and THEIR industry not any firm or any industry. The people I know who got onto graduate schemes were the ones talking about Easter internships in first year and networking with juniors in the firms they wanted to work at. 99% are the rest of students who think that if they work hard for their exams and have a part-time job and societies then they deserve a graduate job at the end. It doesn't work like that. A degree and job are prerequisites to apply in the first place.

(Original post by thisistheend)
Not to take this the wrong way, because I have understood from very early on some of the points you've raised, but people like you is why I dropped Economics after my first year at uni.

I did not understand why the people I saw were happy and motivated not just in their social life but career preparations, I was dying inside. I never aspired to any job in particular, obviously I knew I had to get a job sometime in life as I do not have a trust fund. I didn't get how someone would just know they want to work in corporate tax for PwC. I realised the value of internships and soft experiences and joined AIESEC, a very career orientated student society amongst in my first month at uni. I was to play a leading role in a project we were doing, I can't remember now what, but I went to meetings, conferences weekends at other unis etc. I also took a booklet from PwC recruitment called the 10 key personal competencies, which I still have kept to this day. I looked around me and I did not feel like I was like the others. How could a person who's never had a birthday party and a complete **** up be able to network in the City of London and be that happy driven successful person.

So I withdrew from almost everything after 6 months at uni until I left, only working annoymously in a ****ty restaurant for spare pocket money. I also dropped Economics and switched to Philosophy, which my parents were furious about because I clearly had the intellectual potential as well as the actual subject interest to do well. I got 550/600 at A-Level and 75 in Economics Theory modules in 1st year uni.

Nothing's really changed much after these years, except now I have a piece of paper that says I'm Qualified to do something I don't like.
That's all understandable and I can empathise with a lot of it. It's that aspiration for a career which sets students apart from others. The earlier you have that aspiration and the stronger it is, the better the candidate. What would you rather be than a teacher?

And by the way, I'm probably more similar to you than you think. I quit Grant Thornton to do an MA in Politics and teach English abroad in China (where I met a few others who had quit City graduate jobs). You have to find what fulfils you in life and if something is not doing that then leave and move on. I graduated into the recession too and there were still endless graduate schemes on offer. Anyone can achieve whatever they please if they have the determination for it; the problem is most people don't or they don't have it until later on (which is why I forced myself). It's easy to blame the economy and their degree, it's not so easy to blame themselves, and most graduates are very good at the former but not so generous with the latter.
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somethingbeautiful
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(Original post by 304820)
I just don't understand the people throwing £6,000 at a Masters in History or whatever. That is a car. That is money for a deposit on a flat. Priorities change a bit once you leave education.
I agree. Not only that but there would be nothing left financially as a safety net. I turned down my place on an MA for this September because it would wipe out all of my savings and I'd still have to work to support myself and P/T work wouldn't pay enough money for me to get through it. But ultimately after considering it, I just don't believe an MA would make any difference anyway so I wasn't willing to make the personal and financial sacrifices to get through it.

(Original post by 304820)
My dream is (was?) to work in public affairs for a charity. I’ve got to the point where I’ve accepted it probably won’t happen. I’ve been rejected from two unpaid internships for cancer charities which was a fairly humbling experience. There is a Charity graduate scheme I’m looking at the moment. Hopefully being the C.A.B. will help for that. You have to pass silly maths tests which is a bit of pain though...I'm a humanities grad..
Best of look with your ambition - since you know what it is you want, I don't think you should give up. I can relate regarding the Maths tests, I had to take Maths/English tests to get onto a level 2 hairdressing course despite being a graduate. You have to let these things wash over you or else you'll end up tearing your hair out. Just see it as a means to an end.

(Original post by 304820)
I find the Prince’s Trust is more geared towards non-graduates. I volunteer alongside someone on a Prince’s Trust scheme at the moment. His real barrier to getting into work is dreadful GCSEs – below C in English and Maths. A good worker actually but who takes a chance these days?
Yes, I think it's primarily aimed at disadvantaged people who don't have a lot of qualifications but they can offer advice and I found it useful to just get advice from as many people as I could and even though I couldn't set up a business with them, my meetings with them were informative.

I hope your meeting with the CAB goes well tomorrow - you know, one day we're going to have good jobs and this will all be remembered as ''that time before I had my awesome job''. Persistence, optimism, hard work and positivity will get us there :five:. I just wish there was a place where a group of people who've gone through this as graduates could meet up and encourage one another (aside from the jobcenter :indiff:), like a support group or something because most people just don't get it.
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jamestg
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(Original post by Juichiro)
I assume then that he self-taught himself business stuff and IT stuff?
He trained to become an accountant but dropped out and got a job at an IT company who were desperate for people. He had no experience in the profession but learnt on the job. After 5 years or so, he was deemed pretty good and went to a company to specialise on consulting one piece of software (quite a few companies use it worldwide) - 20 years later he moved through the ranks and became the leading consultant for the software!
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shyaamb
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BA in Philosophy?? Mate you can become a TOK teacher for the IB. It pays really well and its in the field that you have a degree in.
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304820
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(Original post by somethingbeautiful)
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I think one problem I have is that I took a “survival” job in retail during the peak of the recession. I did this as a) any gap in employment is not acceptable to hiring managers b) There is dignity in any work compared to visiting my local job centre c) There was unemployment at 2.5m and frankly any job was an achievement. People have short memories - employers were dropping like flies at one point.

Problem comes when you come to interview with a manager whose only experience of the recession has been reading about it in the Telegraph. I've had a couple of interviews where my decision to take the retail job has been called into question. Was I not committed to the industry enough? Yet if you do not take such a job you run the risk of a job centre sanction or being called a "job snob"... #rantover.
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Spiros90
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Cleaning job, or its thats too intolerable just sell drugs.
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WishIHadRevised
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Could you go into a marketing graduate scheme?
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jambojim97
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(Original post by somethingbeautiful)
I would discourage it (I'm a Philosophy grad, see my other post).

Edit, I'm going to expand on that since I have an affinity for Philosophy and don't want to give the impression that it's not worth studying per se.

Philosophy itself is fascinating and a subject well worth reading into. But I'd advise that if you really want to study it, unless you plan to teach afterwards (at whatever level e.g. doing a PGCE or pursue a PhD) or as I say above, use your degree simply as means to get into generic grad roles/the armed forces etc then there isn't much point in studying a degree in it.

If Philosophy really interests you, you could explore the subject in your spare time or take an Open University/Edx course etc. A degree will shape your future or at least affect it to a large extent - so, personally, if I could give my younger self advice it would be:

Study something that leads to a job (i.e. something vocational) and use your spare time to pursue your interests. You have your whole life to learn about Philosophy, or History or English Literature or whatever - you don't have you whole life to become qualified for a decently paid job that will cover bills/food/transport/rent etc.

Life becomes pretty 'real' once you graduate and your reality will be pleasant or unpleasant largely based on your ability to find employment .
I would advise studying something employable.
No no no no no no no....
It's not that she studied Philosophy. Remember that 50% of graduate level jobs don't specify a degree subject. It's that she thought a 2.1 in Phil would be enough.

Had she already knew what she wanted to do at the beginning of uni, got relevant work experience and extracurriculars, she would be have thrived.

Basically, it's not arts degrees that are the problem, it's (most of) the people doing them!

Source: My sister did a degree in Classics but knew she wanted to go into Accountancy. Now CIMA qualified working for GSK. And no, before you ask, we are not from a rich and well connected family. In fact, my sis was the first in the fam to attend university.
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somethingbeautiful
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(Original post by 304820)
I think one problem I have is that I took a “survival” job in retail during the peak of the recession. I did this as a) any gap in employment is not acceptable to hiring managers b) There is dignity in any work compared to visiting my local job centre c) There was unemployment at 2.5m and frankly any job was an achievement. People have short memories - employers were dropping like flies at one point.

Problem comes when you come to interview with a manager whose only experience of the recession has been reading about it in the Telegraph. I've had a couple of interviews where my decision to take the retail job has been called into question. Was I not committed to the industry enough? Yet if you do not take such a job you run the risk of a job centre sanction or being called a "job snob"... #rantover.
You've hit the nail of the head there.

Like you, I took stop-gap work and I found myself having to justify it to employers, when my only other option was to go on the dole so I had nothing to justify. I had two employers outright ask me why I didn't want to do anything with my degree which is such a clueless question if it's genuine and such a pointless question if it's tactical because of course you're not going to be honest and say ''of course I want to do something with my degree, I'm sat here because it's not working out for me''.


(Original post by jambojim97)
No no no no no no no....
It's not that she studied Philosophy. Remember that 50% of graduate level jobs don't specify a degree subject. It's that she thought a 2.1 in Phil would be enough.

Had she already knew what she wanted to do at the beginning of uni, got relevant work experience and extracurriculars, she would be have thrived.

Basically, it's not arts degrees that are the problem, it's (most) of the people doing them!
Please read the thread, this has been discussed and I've made my opinions clear. I disagree with you, you'll see why if you read my posts (not saying you'll agree with me, but you'll see why I disagree) . The thread is quite interesting, so it's worth a good read.
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_icecream
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Uni was a waste of time don't bother going unless you want to be a Doctor/Nurse or doing other health related courses
I see many graduates working in places like supermarkets , coffee shops etc..... They wish they never went to uni
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304820
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(Original post by somethingbeautiful)
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I’m high jacking someone else’s thread (sorry OP) but just interviewed with the CAB and they want me. It will get me an up to date reference if nothing else. Basically the same kind of thing I was doing when interning in Parliament just without all the party politics getting in the way.

It all seemed very welcoming and non-judgmental which is in contrast to a number of interviews I’ve had. I remember one interview I had with Ofcom after a couple of months out of work (along with 2,499,999 people at the time) and they seemed aghast at my joblessness.

I don't claim to have all the answers. We graduated at a bad time. I've learnt any work is better than none but equally a "survival job" can damage your employment prospects long-term - though less than long-term unemployment can. I just wish I had graduated into a boom I certainly wouldn't have taken my degree under the 9k fee system. An 18 year old is making a financial decision that could impact on then 30 years later. Madness.
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smile:D
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(Original post by kka25)
I've always wanted to do a BA in Philosophy; this is discouraging

(Original post by somethingbeautiful)
I would discourage it (I'm a Philosophy grad, see my other post).
I study History, which I suppose has a similar sort of reputation to Philosophy for poor job prospects. However, I can't emphasise enough that it's not a barrier provided you are proactive. Start thinking about your career early - all unis will have events and a careers service that you can go to for advice. Obviously, scientific jobs will be closed to you, but, beyond that, provided you do research in the sector(s) you're interested in and secure an internship your degree won't be a barrier. Also, a 1st in a subject you enjoy is much better than a 2.2 and a poor university experience because you hated your subject.
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304820
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(Original post by kka25)
I've always wanted to do a BA in Philosophy; this is discouraging
The jobs market of 2011-2013 was absolutely brutal for anyone graduating. You have to bear that in mind with a few comments on here. It certainly clouded my judgement as to the value of my degree.

I remember speaking to someone at Yougov around this time who said he got 500 applicants for a position. In all likelihood you’ll be graduating into a far better economy.
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The Empire Odyssey
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(Original post by kka25)
I've always wanted to do a BA in Philosophy; this is discouraging
Well it shouldn't. He obviously just picked philosophy because he didn't like economics.... Loads of people go into teaching after having "nothing else" to do with their degree. My English teacher did the exact thing.. Turned out she enjoys teaching now.

It's not what degree you do, but what you do with it afterwards. Philosophy is similar to English. It will lead you to a lot of different kinds of doors. But English graduates tend to earn a little bit higher than Philosophy graduates.

He was unsatisfied with his degree because he didn't know what he wanted to do. Don't be discouraged. If you want to study philosophy, go for it. I would be more worried about not knowing which career you want to go into. His in his mess because he didn't know what career he wanted to do. Find that out first, then pick your degree. Regardless if you do Philosophy, Geography Economics, Biology. If you're not going to go into the field of study you read at uni, then it becomes worthless anyway, regardless of the subject. I'm studying English and if I were to go into ICT (like I would), it would just make my degree pointless/void.

Pick what career you'd like to be in, then see which degree is most suited.
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ednut
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[QUOTE=thisistheend;54578297]As the title says, I trained to become a teacher because I was unemployable coming out of an Arts degree with zero work experience or personal competencies. Turned out I didn't really like teaching either and spent 2 years dossing about on supply after I qualified.

Trying to start a business I’m an artist check out my thread

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5169486
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