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How did you find this year's FP1 (EDEXCEL) watch

  • View Poll Results: How did you find the EDEXCEL FP1/
    I found it very hard
    29
    14.29%
    I found it hard
    54
    26.60%
    I found it ok
    61
    30.05%
    I found it easy
    38
    18.72%
    I found it very easy
    21
    10.34%

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    (Original post by lukejoshjames)
    I honestly don't think I dropped any, and if I did it was a stupid mistake in the first question lol, but still it took me some time to complete when usually I finish the papers in 45 minutes or so.

    First question was 1 real number and two complex conjugate pair. Fair play, you could still end up with 100ums loll
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    dat 100ums coming my way.
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    (Original post by Tiri)
    First question was 1 real number and two complex conjugate pair. Fair play, you could still end up with 100ums loll
    Yeah I hope so, but when I say stupid I mean I probably simplified a fraction wrong, or added wrong, that seems to be something I do under pressure -.-
    How did you find it?
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    (Original post by ThatPerson)
    I think either notation would've confused people. If they used a cross instead some people would mistake it for the cross product.
    Edexcel is run by some strongly opinionated old farts.
    they use half of a square root symbol
    No modern book or other board does that

    the correct notation if I understand well should have been
    |AB| |AD|
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    (Original post by lukejoshjames)
    Yeah I hope so, but when I say stupid I mean I probably simplified a fraction wrong, or added wrong, that seems to be something I do under pressure -.-
    How did you find it?

    I did good. Considering I probably have the worst exam anxiety out of all the students on the TSR haha.
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    (Original post by TeeEm)
    Edexcel is run by some strongly opinionated old farts.
    they use half of a square root symbol
    No modern book or other board does that

    the correct notation if I understand well should have been
    |AB| |AD|

    Was the old edexcel examining board part of University of London board by any chance? (talking like early 70's)
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    (Original post by Tiri)
    Was the old edexcel examining board part of University of London board by any chance? (talking like early 70's)
    Originally yes
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    (Original post by Xin Xang)
    I think if you were not fairly familiar with the expansion of (n+1)^2 , then you may not have seen immediately what the factorisation would look like.
    I didn't actually, I just worked backwards from what they wanted me to prove.

    (Original post by kprime2)
    The last question was all in terms of p and q which made things really messy.
    I know right! I didn't actually get an answer in the end. I got the equations, equalled them to each other, but I kept getting p=q etc... The last thing I wanted. How was I supposed to get a different answer?


    (Original post by simonli2575)
    I'm guessing 69.
    That's reeeeeally high - isn't it? Are further maths grade boundaries always higher than C1, C2 et al?
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    (Original post by fran_fran)

    That's reeeeeally high - isn't it? Are further maths grade boundaries always higher than C1, C2 et al?
    Maybe, depending on the modules because harder modules are only taken by better candidates, which in turn makes their grade boundaries higher - or so I've heard.
    Though I said 69 only because this year's paper was easy.
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    the chart shows a "normal" distribution
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3327325
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    (Original post by Xin Xang)
    Apparently it was "unfair" that the edexcel used the dot notation as some students "mistakenly" thought that it meant the dot product.

    I was simply pointing out that it technically is a dot product.
    I don't see what the problem is, FP1 is an AS module therefore it doesn't require dot/cross product - surely people know that?
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    I think, after seeing Arsey's, I got 74/75. I'm kind of annoyed because his I made a dumb error with my boundaries -_-. I did 13<x<13.25, instead of 13.25<x<13.50. I enjoyed the paper a lot however. Was not too hard, just a tad harder than last years.
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    (Original post by Chazatthekeys)
    I don't see what the problem is, FP1 is an AS module therefore it doesn't require dot/cross product - surely people know that?
    Edexcel say C3 and C4 are necessary to learn FP1, so dot/cross product is assumed knowledge for FP1.
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    Edexcel say C3 and C4 are necessary to learn FP1, so dot/cross product is assumed knowledge for FP1.
    Not necessarily! People do FP1 alongside C1/C2
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    Edexcel say C3 and C4 are necessary to learn FP1, so dot/cross product is assumed knowledge for FP1.
    Nope, there are very few things required, and they can easily be learnt within the FP1 course.
    I'm pretty sure the only things it requires are parametric equations (which is taught in the book), implicit differentiation and the chain rule. Other than that, everything is explained.
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    (Original post by Chazatthekeys)
    Not necessarily! People do FP1 alongside C1/C2
    I know that they do but edexcel say that it should be taught after C3 and C4.

    (Original post by lukejoshjames)
    Nope, there are very few things required, and they can easily be learnt within the FP1 course.
    I'm pretty sure the only things it requires are parametric equations (which is taught in the book), implicit differentiation and the chain rule. Other than that, everything is explained.
    They're explained because they're the things that come up most, but you're supposed to know the whole thing. For example, there was a question that I did that required knowledge from C3, which was tan addition formula and is listed under C3 in the formula book. The diagram here shows what I'm talking about.
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    I know that they do but edexcel say that it should be taught after C3 and C4.



    They're explained because they're the things that come up most, but you're supposed to know the whole thing. For example, there was a question that I did that required knowledge from C3, which was tan addition formula and is listed under C3 in the formula book. The diagram here shows what I'm talking about.
    Can you link me to the question or a similar one, because I've never come across a question that I don't have the knowledge for in FP1, and I'm starting C3 and C4 next year...
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    (Original post by lukejoshjames)
    Can you link me to the question or a similar one, because I've never come across a question that I don't have the knowledge for in FP1, and I'm starting C3 and C4 next year...
    No.
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    (Original post by cerlohee)
    No.
    k then lol
 
 
 
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