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Why do feminists say 'teach men not to rape'? watch

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    (Original post by scrotgrot)

    Rape is and always has been considered the second most heinous crime it is possible to commit against the person after murder. Even then half the time there is more sympathy for for example women raped by militiamen in the Congo than their husbands who got a bayonet in the neck.
    Or who get raped.

    "Often, she says, wives who discover their husbands have been raped decide to leave them. "They ask me: 'So now how am I going to live with him? As what? Is this still a husband? Is it a wife?' They ask, 'If he can be raped, who is protecting me?' There's one family I have been working closely with in which the husband has been raped twice. When his wife discovered this, she went home, packed her belongings, picked up their child and left. Of course that brought down this man's heart."

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2...he-rape-of-men

    That is clearly one ****ed up response deu to gender norms. But because it is not badly effecting women Feminism is quite about it (mostly).

    Men are disposable you see and it is their own fault when stuff like this happens for being weak.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Men are disposable you see and it is their own fault when stuff like this happens for being weak.
    In the same article that you linked, you can see that the male victims stay quiet because they fear the reactions of other men. It is not feminism that causes men to fear other men.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Except I in no way said that, you read that from your emotions. Not from my words.

    And nowhere did I say their actions are justified.

    If you don't want to understand what causes rape then fine, but don't come crying about rape not being prevented then. You can't prevent something you don't understand.

    If you want to have an intelligent discussion and actual listen rather read things that aren't there then fine. But if you want to start getting emotional and turning this into a fallacy then don't reply back to me.
    I'd just like to add that I think you're spot on.

    As regards the thread, I am a feminist, but certainly not a fan of the phrase "Teach men not to rape". I agree with the concept of not victim-blaming, and teaching people of both sexes about issues of consent and rights and personal safety, but it's such an antagonistic and divisive phrase. We need men to be on side with understanding and educating about consent and it's really quite an offensive message.
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    (Original post by llys)
    In the same article that you linked, you can see that the male victims stay quiet because they fear the reactions of other men. It is not feminism that causes men to fear other men.
    Just to point out I am not overtly against feminism. I'm generally supportive of it. It's just by it's nature it focuses more on when women get the short end of the stick (which happens a lot) with regards to gender relations. It doesn't have to, but it does tend to ignore when these gender politics effect men badly. Take the above example of violence in war. Little boys get taken and forced to join armies, men get killed when they stand in the way of other men trying to harm their family and they get raped as well along with the women as evident above.

    Feminism is good when it questions and attacks a perceived patriarchy, but patriarchies do not uniquely harm women. Just like intersectional feminism takes into account other societal features like class, age, race and so on the same needs to happen with men. It is not as simple as men as a homogeneous group are oppressing women.

    In these incredibly patriarchal and violent situations men get a raw deal as well. You need to be strong and if you fail at that, like getting raped by soldiers, your wife will up route, leave you and take your kids away from you for being weak just when you are so vulnerable. Which is an awful thing to do. Imagine if that was the other way round? Also this is clearly an example of a woman treating a man badly due to a strong patriarchal set up in society.

    In a much less extreme case men in the west are still supposed to be independent, strong, be able to deal with things and be bread winners. You are not supposed to ask for help or being overly emotional. It is probably one of the factors that leads to more men committing suicide.

    tl:dr ~ I'm not against feminism. Patriarchy has negative effects on men as well. Feminism shouldn't ignore them.

    (Original post by Jelkin)
    I'd just like to add that I think you're spot on.

    As regards the thread, I am a feminist, but certainly not a fan of the phrase "Teach men not to rape". I agree with the concept of not victim-blaming, and teaching people of both sexes about issues of consent and rights and personal safety, but it's such an antagonistic and divisive phrase. We need men to be on side with understanding and educating about consent and it's really quite an offensive message.
    Ye I agree with this. I already feel like a pedophile if I do so much as talk to a young girl
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    (Original post by elizah)
    1 out of 181 rape accusations are false. 20% of all women will be raped in their lifetime. Stop derailing the discussion about rape to things that are completely irrelevant.
    Dodgy statistics with no source and using the word toxic in the wrong context? The hell are you doing outside of tumblr?
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    Because policing the way other people act gives you more of a power trip then changing the way you act yourself. Even though anyone with an iota of common sense can see that learning to defend yourself against an attacker and actually making sure you don't end up in a vulnerable state is much more effective and less destructive then teaching little boys that they need to overcome their innate compulsion to rape.
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    (Original post by elizah)
    Actually, if you did read our conversation, which by your answer, you certainly didn't, you would've seen that I didn't change my opinion, I simply added that "by the way, this isn't even relevant, so why are you even bringing it up in the first place", because it had nothing to do with anything.
    She was in the wrong, because she said that most rapists are normal people who simply made a few mistakes, which is completely untrue, most rapists are people with mental health issues, such as having been molested or raped themselves, hating women and feeling a strong desire to control them, certain paraphilias, and also, in some cases (which is the reason why rape is more prevalent in poorer areas), it's socioeconomically related. People do not wake up one day and rape, they went wrong somewhere.
    She didn't say that people wake up one day and commit rape. And I did, in fact, read your conversation with her. Here's what she said in her original post. I've highlighted some parts.

    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Believe it or not, most rapists aren't evil psychopaths that everyone paints them to be purely because it's an easier concept to deal with. It's not that black and white. Most of them are just normal people who did a horrible thing, many feel remorse and guilt.

    Somewhere is their lives they went the wrong way, their morals became skewed ect. There are many factors that can lead someone to rape.

    It's important for us as a society to not only understand how this happens, but also to help prevent this.

    Edit: for the easily emotionally charged and those who overreact. No, I'm not saying that rapists aren't accountable for their own actions. Stop jumping to conclusions.
    Here is your response to that:

    (Original post by elizah)
    True. Rapists aren't bad, they just made a mistake, and shaming them like that is wrong! Instead, teach women to not walk alone at night, to not wear too revealing clothes, cause it may make those poor men make mistakes and rape them, and if they do, it's on them!
    Which is presumptuous, to say the least. By 'normal people', she probably meant that they're not evil psychopaths who follow people in the street all day picking their next target, not that 'rapists/rape are normal', which, I think, is what you thought she meant. She wasn't in the wrong at all. Your reply to SophieSmall accused her of a bunch of things that she hadn't said, which is what I refer to as your attempt to derail the argument.

    I'm really struggling to piece together what you actually think about this, since you've said quite contrary things in the same post:

    "What, that not all rapists are psychopaths?"
    Except, I never mentioned that they weren't psychopaths. Most rapists are not mentally ill. I've said this already.
    She was in the wrong, because she said that most rapists are normal people who simply made a few mistakes, which is completely untrue, most rapists are people with mental health issues
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    That does not mean that they are normal people who simply wake up one day, make a mistake, become a serial rapist for a day, regret it terribly and then return to their natural and normal state of mind. That doesn't happen and to believe so trivializes the issue to a certain degree.
    As I've already said, she didn't mean that rapists/rape is normal, just that most people who do it are ordinary people with jobs, families, commitments etc. as opposed to escaped prisoners who're kept in solitary confinement in chains because they're a danger to everyone, including themselves. It doesn't trivialise anything. It's a shame, really, that I can't take that word seriously anymore because it is used so often to shut down debate.

    Ugh. Honestly? Sources?
    Yes. Honestly. Sources. It's not too much too ask if you're going to make such large claims.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/20/li...men-new-study/
    http://www.cdc.gov/violencepreventio...atasheet-a.pdf
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-16192494
    http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2013/j...-england-wales (And before you dismiss the guardian, they do provide sources).
    In 2011, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that "nearly 20% of all women" in the United States suffered attempted sexual assault, sexual assault (forced kissing and fondling), attempted rape, and rape sometime in their life. More than a third of the victims were raped before the age of 18.[7]"
    Okay, so the first of your sources has to do with only one university in upstate New York, which is hardly representative enough to support the statement that '20 percent of all women will be raped in their lifetime.'

    The second is more credible and mentions that 18 percent of women questioned had been victims of rape or attempted rape, not just rape. I would blame the people who did the survey in this instance for not using separate boxes for rape and attempted rape but surely you see the flaw: this is a statistic of how many people (let's assume all the rape attempts were successful) were raped as of 2012 in the United States. It doesn't mean that this rate will hold as is implied by the statement that '20 percent of all women will be raped in their lifetimes.'

    The third, at a glance, is a BBC report of the second.

    The fourth shows some worrying figures but, again, do nothing to prove that 20 percent of women will be raped in their lifetimes.

    Sorry for the length of this post, I tried to be thorough and not misread the articles.
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    (Original post by elizah)
    True. Rapists aren't bad, they just made a mistake, and shaming them like that is wrong! Instead, teach women to not walk alone at night, to not wear too revealing clothes, cause it may make those poor men make mistakes and rape them, and if they do, it's on them!
    So what a woman wears and where a woman goes is obviously saying that she wants to have sex with a man, whether or not she consents? Does what a woman wears and where she goes means that she is asking to be scarred for life? Are you saying that men don't have enough sense to realise that clothing and location doesn't mean a woman is wanting sex?

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    Consent: 'permission for something to happen or agreement to do something'

    Teaching men not to rape is not about sitting down all men and giving them lessons on how to 'control their urges' or whatever. We know that not all men are rapists. Instead it's about making sure that everyone knows that there needs to be consent before sex, that consent can't be given when drunk or drugged, that consent can be revoked during the act (it HAS to be said, they have to say no, stop, they can't decide afterwards that they didn't want it). It's also about stopping victim blaming - stopping girls being blamed for getting raped because of what they were wearing or because they were drunk. Yes, it may have been their decision to wear whatever they were wearing, but just because someone isn't wearing a hard hat, doesn't mean I can be excused for throwing a brick at their head. To say that a large majority of rape accusations are just girls who had sex with a 'munter' and then regretted it so said they were raped is trivializing and offensive - some girls are young when they are raped, some girls are not.

    Teaching men not to rape is not about 'stopping men from inevitably raping someone', it's about making sure everyone knows what is acceptable, what is consented and what is not, and stopping victim blaming.

    ALSO let me just say that yes men CAN get raped and YES feminists (or intersectional feminists) address this, recognise this, and they see this as a problem. Stop using male rape victims as a way to attack feminists.
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    (Original post by elizah)
    No, that is not rape. Rape is not any unsolicited sexual contact, that's sexual harrassment, but rape is defined as penetration of the mouth, anus or vagina with or without force without consent of the victim. That is what rape is.
    "Your statistics is hardly more impressive"? Why are you trying to trivialize rape statistics and make them appear as "less impressive" than they are? 20% of all women will be raped during their lifetime, why are you justifying that by criticizing feminists?
    That statistic is not based on anything reliable


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    (Original post by cacra)
    No they don't actually.

    Rape is defined as penetration with a penis.
    Both males and females are capable of sexual assault and it can have an equal negative impact on the victim regardless of their or the attackers' gender.
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    [QUOTE=kate37;59322069]Consent: 'permission for something to happen or agreement to do something'

    Teaching men not to rape is not about sitting down all men and giving them lessons on how to 'control their urges' or whatever. We know that not all men are rapists. Instead it's about making sure that everyone knows that there needs to be consent before sex, that consent can't be given when drunk or drugged, that consent can be revoked during the act (it HAS to be said, they have to say no, stop, they can't decide afterwards that they didn't want it). It's also about stopping victim blaming - stopping girls being blamed for getting raped because of what they were wearing or because they were drunk. Yes, it may have been their decision to wear whatever they were wearing, but just because someone isn't wearing a hard hat, doesn't mean I can be excused for throwing a brick at their head. To say that a large majority of rape accusations are just girls who had sex with a 'munter' and then regretted it so said they were raped is trivializing and offensive - some girls are young when they are raped, some girls are not.

    I totally agree with this!
    As far as I am concerned rape is rape regardless of the what the victim's looks, clothes, behaviour, reputation and so on.
    Women have disclosed rape before and people have responded by saying that they were asking for it or deserved it because they had x number of previous sexual partners or were wearing a short skirt and so as a result these women are too humiliated and ashamed to report the rape to the police.
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    (Original post by bethfrench)
    So what a woman wears and where a woman goes is obviously saying that she wants to have sex with a man, whether or not she consents? Does what a woman wears and where she goes means that she is asking to be scarred for life? Are you saying that men don't have enough sense to realise that clothing and location doesn't mean a woman is wanting sex?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    She's being sarcastic... Wrongly so but she then goes on to make her position clear.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    She didn't say that people wake up one day and commit rape. And I did, in fact, read your conversation with her. Here's what she said in her original post. I've highlighted some parts.



    Here is your response to that:



    Which is presumptuous, to say the least. By 'normal people', she probably meant that they're not evil psychopaths who follow people in the street all day picking their next target, not that 'rapists/rape are normal', which, I think, is what you thought she meant. She wasn't in the wrong at all. Your reply to SophieSmall accused her of a bunch of things that she hadn't said, which is what I refer to as your attempt to derail the argument.

    I'm really struggling to piece together what you actually think about this, since you've said quite contrary things in the same post:




    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    As I've already said, she didn't mean that rapists/rape is normal, just that most people who do it are ordinary people with jobs, families, commitments etc. as opposed to escaped prisoners who're kept in solitary confinement in chains because they're a danger to everyone, including themselves. It doesn't trivialise anything. It's a shame, really, that I can't take that word seriously anymore because it is used so often to shut down debate.



    Yes. Honestly. Sources. It's not too much too ask if you're going to make such large claims.



    Okay, so the first of your sources has to do with only one university in upstate New York, which is hardly representative enough to support the statement that '20 percent of all women will be raped in their lifetime.'

    The second is more credible and mentions that 18 percent of women questioned had been victims of rape or attempted rape, not just rape. I would blame the people who did the survey in this instance for not using separate boxes for rape and attempted rape but surely you see the flaw: this is a statistic of how many people (let's assume all the rape attempts were successful) were raped as of 2012 in the United States. It doesn't mean that this rate will hold as is implied by the statement that '20 percent of all women will be raped in their lifetimes.'

    The third, at a glance, is a BBC report of the second.

    The fourth shows some worrying figures but, again, do nothing to prove that 20 percent of women will be raped in their lifetimes.

    Sorry for the length of this post, I tried to be thorough and not misread the articles.
    She said that rapists were normal people when it is not true because most rapists have mental health problems.

    "By normal people, she probably meant that they're not evil psychopaths who follow people in the street all day picking their next target, not that rapists are normal." That was literally what she said, which isn't true, because most of them do have mental health issues. By her logic, you have to understand an issue to solve it, and when you categorize rapists as "normal people who make a few bad mistakes" you are a) not helping the issue in the slightest because b) you're wrong which c) even, to a certain extent trivializes the issue, when you're making out rapists to be normal people, and not be as bad as you think they are. Does that make sense to you?

    Having a mental illness and having mental health problems are not the same thing. In order to be diagnosed with a mental illness, you need to fit a certain DSM-IV quota - not all people with mental health problems do that. Being psychopathic and having paraphilias are not the same thing. Hating women and feeling a need to control them and being sociopathic is not the same thing. Having been raped or molested and being schizophenic is not the same thing and it's very important to distinguish between having mental health issues and having a full blown illness.

    But, again, saying that most people who rape are ordinary people with jobs, families, and commitments and not full-blown psychos isn't true. Most people who rape are ****ed up in the head, and it does not matter whether they have mental illnesses or are psychopaths or not; they have some sort of mental health issue.According to studies, most murderers are not mentally ill. This does not make them "normal people who make a few mistakes, but due to not being psychos, are capable of feeling remorse".
    (And yes, it's not that hard to use Google.)

    1) Nope, it doesn't, but I used it to show you that the pattern is quite similar, in the way, that quite a lot of sources from all kinds of different parts of the world has the same percentage of women getting raped. It's not 35% in New York, 15% in Chicago, 29% in New Jersey, 12% in the UK, etc, but it tends to be quite a static number. However, that's fair enough, I can see where you're coming from.

    2) Haha, what in the ****? There is absolutely no mention of attempted rape in this source, it says that "18% of women reported experiencing rape in their lifetime". The only mention of rape is regarding the college age and the multiple race rape stats, it's not mentioned in the text at all. And yes, it does, because it's a static number, this is not the only source saying 20%, which leads it to being way more credible.

    3) It literally shows that 20% of all women in the United States has suffered attempted sexual assault, sexual assault, rape or attempted rape in their lifetime. It shows that 20% of women have been raped, so yes, it does.
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    (Original post by bethfrench)
    So what a woman wears and where a woman goes is obviously saying that she wants to have sex with a man, whether or not she consents? Does what a woman wears and where she goes means that she is asking to be scarred for life? Are you saying that men don't have enough sense to realise that clothing and location doesn't mean a woman is wanting sex?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I was being sarcastic, love.
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    Dodgy statistics with no source and using the word toxic in the wrong context? The hell are you doing outside of tumblr?
    Ugh. http://www.theguardian.com/society/2...se-accusations
    There were 35 cases of false rape allegations out of 5651 rape prosecutions. That's in in 181, which is about 0.005%. 20% of women in the US have been raped. We have bigger issues than false rape allegations.
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    (Original post by elizah)
    She said that rapists were normal people when it is not true because most rapists have mental health problems.

    "By normal people, she probably meant that they're not evil psychopaths who follow people in the street all day picking their next target, not that rapists are normal." That was literally what she said, which isn't true, because most of them do have mental health issues. By her logic, you have to understand an issue to solve it, and when you categorize rapists as "normal people who make a few bad mistakes" you are a) not helping the issue in the slightest because b) you're wrong which c) even, to a certain extent trivializes the issue, when you're making out rapists to be normal people, and not be as bad as you think they are. Does that make sense to you?
    As I've pointed out a few replies back, 'trivialises' is a word that carries little to no meaning in any debate. Has she fundamentally set the debate on how to prevent and punish rape back by any significant amount of time by using words whose interpretation by you speculates that they're normalising rape? No, she hasn't. So let's get that out of the way, please.

    I see nothing wrong with calling them 'normal people who make a few bad mistakes.' As I've said before, she did not mean that, as her edit to the first post and subsequent replies clarified. The fact that you continue to pull her up on your original interpretation says more about you than about her. Nobody is saying that rape is normal - she's saying that most rapists are normal people in the sense that the phrase 'normal people' sounds to everybody but people like you who're determined to be offended by just about everything. They're just words on an Internet website. They don't mean what you think they mean and, contrary to what you might assert, they haven't just swung the needle from 'rape is wrong' to 'rape is not wrong' in anybody's mind. Does that make sense to you?

    Having a mental illness and having mental health problems are not the same thing. In order to be diagnosed with a mental illness, you need to fit a certain DSM-IV quota - not all people with mental health problems do that. Being psychopathic and having paraphilias are not the same thing. Hating women and feeling a need to control them and being sociopathic is not the same thing. Having been raped or molested and being schizophenic is not the same thing and it's very important to distinguish between having mental health issues and having a full blown illness.
    This has to be the most long-winded attempt to avoid admitting you've contradicted yourself I've seen to date. I have not stated or implied that any of the underlined are the case. You've brought clinical diagnoses into it but you have to understand that diagnoses are themselves a grey area and holes through which people can slip. For you to take advantage of that to make the ludicrous point that somebody with mental health problems doesn't have a mental illness is rather irritating.

    But, again, saying that most people who rape are ordinary people with jobs, families, and commitments and not full-blown psychos isn't true.
    I think you're confusing the popular term 'psycho' with actual psychopathy, which, according to Google, is a general term for mental illness or disorder. Do you have any evidence to suggest that most rapists don't have jobs, families and commitments? Because it's difficult to survive long enough (parents are included in 'families') to sit at home plotting your next attack like somebody who was '****ed up in the head' might. I'm not saying none of them doesn't have a job or family or commitments but that most do. Ironically, your own example of the New York university should have told you this already: most of the perpetrators in those cases would have been students or (in fewer cases) university staff, both of whom are ordinary people with ordinary lives.

    After that wall of text I've subjected you to, if you want to keep insisting that mere acknowledgement that most rapists are normal people with normal lives prior to becoming rapists, go ahead and do so. I'm not going to reply to it again as most of the arguments have been exhausted.

    Most people who rape are ****ed up in the head, and it does not matter whether they have mental illnesses or are psychopaths or not; they have some sort of mental health issue.According to studies, most murderers are not mentally ill. This does not make them "normal people who make a few mistakes, but due to not being psychos, are capable of feeling remorse".
    (And yes, it's not that hard to use Google.)
    Actually, it does. If they're not mentally ill, then, until they've committed the murder(s), they are 'normal people who make a few [one, if it's a single murder] mistakes.' You're being emotional about it instead of actually reading the text. It's not saying anything that's unreasonable.

    1) Nope, it doesn't, but I used it to show you that the pattern is quite similar, in the way, that quite a lot of sources from all kinds of different parts of the world has the same percentage of women getting raped. It's not 35% in New York, 15% in Chicago, 29% in New Jersey, 12% in the UK, etc, but it tends to be quite a static number. However, that's fair enough, I can see where you're coming from.
    I find it difficult to believe that it could be a static number in different places given that 'rape capital' is an actual term used to describe places with very high incidences of rape. However, I don't know that so I'm willing to be convinced either way. By the way, the first source is about a single university in New York, not the entire state of New York so it's not really representative of New York either.

    2) Haha, what in the ****? There is absolutely no mention of attempted rape in this source, it says that "18% of women reported experiencing rape in their lifetime". The only mention of rape is regarding the college age and the multiple race rape stats, it's not mentioned in the text at all. And yes, it does, because it's a static number, this is not the only source saying 20%, which leads it to being way more credible.
    Hmm, I'll admit I confused that with one of the others. It doesn't show that '20 percent of women will be raped in their lifetime.' I really wish you'd get this bit right - I just devoted quite a bit of time to this. Happened does not equal will happen. That's making a huge assumption and one that you're duty-bound to state before making a claim of that sort. I'd have no problem with it if you said 'assuming that this trend continues, 20 percent of women will be raped in their lifetime' if there was a trend in the first place. But no, you keep repeating that claim over and over citing sources, after complaining about being asked for them, that don't prove, and can't prove it.

    As for whether there's a trend, that would depend on you providing sources that the number is static across state and national lines. I'm not saying it's not static, before you get angry about that. I'm just asking for evidence.

    3) It literally shows that 20% of all women in the United States has suffered attempted sexual assault, sexual assault, rape or attempted rape in their lifetime. It shows that 20% of women have been raped, so yes, it does.
    I can't believe you've made such a stupid error. Three of the things you've listed in your magic 20 percent figure are not-rape; you then go onto say 'it shows that 20 percent of women have been raped.' No, it doesn't. It shows that 20 percent of women have suffered attempted sexual assault, attempted rape, sexual assault or rape. It may be that the whole 20 percent are concentrated into the rape category but there's no evidence of that. Furthermore, there's no evidence that this is indicative of what will happen in future so, no, it doesn't show that '20 percent of women will be raped in their lifetimes', which is my critique of it.

    I hope that made sense. I'm not going to continue writing essay-sized posts if the most basic points continue to elude you and you struggle to keep the argument civil.
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    We had a lesson where they told us women can't 'technically' rape, but that doesn't exemplify them from what we think of rape as.

    As a feminist, I think we should teach people as a whole to respect other people and their wishes, and to accept no means no. I'm pretty sure the 'teach men not to rape' comes from people saying 'well you shouldn't wear/dress like that if you don't want to be raped', because that is victim blaming and also a little messed up, surely? You don't say 'don't wear that if you don't want to be murdered'.
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    Hydeman killing it.
    This post was longer but Hydeman has already addressed what I was about to.

    Anyway...
    As for the Guardian article ( http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2013/j...-england-wales ), it says that there were "around 69,000 female victims of rape" in the given year. While 69000 is 69000 too many it is certainly not 20% of the adult, female population of the UK.
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    (Original post by kate37)
    Consent: 'permission for something to happen or agreement to do something'

    Teaching men not to rape is not about sitting down all men and giving them lessons on how to 'control their urges' or whatever. We know that not all men are rapists. Instead it's about making sure that everyone knows that there needs to be consent before sex, that consent can't be given when drunk or drugged, that consent can be revoked during the act (it HAS to be said, they have to say no, stop, they can't decide afterwards that they didn't want it). It's also about stopping victim blaming - stopping girls being blamed for getting raped because of what they were wearing or because they were drunk. Yes, it may have been their decision to wear whatever they were wearing, but just because someone isn't wearing a hard hat, doesn't mean I can be excused for throwing a brick at their head. To say that a large majority of rape accusations are just girls who had sex with a 'munter' and then regretted it so said they were raped is trivializing and offensive - some girls are young when they are raped, some girls are not.

    Teaching men not to rape is not about 'stopping men from inevitably raping someone', it's about making sure everyone knows what is acceptable, what is consented and what is not, and stopping victim blaming.

    ALSO let me just say that yes men CAN get raped and YES feminists (or intersectional feminists) address this, recognise this, and they see this as a problem. Stop using male rape victims as a way to attack feminists.
    I agree with what you say, you put it much better than me.
 
 
 
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The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

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