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£80000 was randomly put into my bank account yesterday. watch

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    (Original post by jimmy_looks_2ice)
    I'm sure there are instances of it happening, hence the laws, but my spidey-sense tells me it hasn't happened to you!

    Even if you're not making this up, by creating this thread, you've screwed yourself in terms of trying to get away with spending the money. You've now left a trail of evidence on the internet that indicates that you're aware of the possibility that you know it's wrong. So your pleas of ignorance of the law won't get very far in court.

    My advice would be to find another way to earn money (crime clearly isn't your forte). Or don't. It might be entertaining to read the news articles about your bungled attempts to spend the money and get away with it.
    And how will they find this thread in the first place?

    And can they prove it was me that was posting?
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    (Original post by jimmy_looks_2ice)
    I believe this to be false. However, as I say, it would be entertaining to later discover the OP testing out the law in real life.
    But why?


    People send money for all sorts of reasons, it makes no sense to be able to say 'sorry I got a couple of digits wrong, can you reverse the transaction?'

    Lol I am right

    http://budgeting.thenest.com/time-fr...fer-33881.html


    (Original post by saule1116)
    I'm assuming that this was the bank's fault, that's why I keep saying that the OP should contact THE BANK about this transfer. If bank claims that they didn't do anything wrong, then fine.. OP can do whatever...
    This is obviously more likely the reason, but I was just making the point.
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    (Original post by driftawaay)
    Well, it depends what kind of lawyer, someone who works for some huge international firm can earn a lot of money (not even 1/3 of what their equivalent makes in the UK though), but the *average* lawyer doesn't make more than500-600 a month, and only experienced lawyers make that kind of money.

    The average middle class salary is between £300 and £500 (£500 is considered a very good salary).

    These figures are all after taxes.

    The minimum wage is £1/hour (yes.. seriously) and the average income is £280/month.

    But there isn't really such a thing as 'middle class' in Hungary, there isn't huge income inequality like in the UK, so teachers don't make a lot more than blue collar workers for example. Everyone makes the same kind of money more or less, there are no private schools. Also, doctors are very under paid and their average salary is £300/month, unless it's a dentist with a private practice or something.

    And buying a house in Hungary would be basically free on a UK salary.
    Thanks, that's very interesting. I didn't realise that the gap was as wide as that - basically it seems that Hungary has about 1/10th the earnings level of the UK. Is the cost of living in the same proportion, or does it feel like people are poorer, for example, are goods like smartphones, TVs or cars basically the same price as in Western Europe?

    PS From the OECD figures, it looks as if average incomes are higher than you said, but maybe that's heavily distorted by the rich?
    http://www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org/countries/hungary/
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    (Original post by saule1116)
    The fact that in your given example you did a transaction through the shop, not directly through Nike.
    The same in your case, you had a transaction through the bank, therefore, if THE BANK made a mistake, then you might be in deep **** if you keep being this cocky about the money that was never meant to be yours. If someone messed up the sort codes and the bank did their part right, then fair enough. Roll on and be happy. All I'm saying is that you might want to check if you can legally use that money before you go around spending it.
    The shop is owned by nike so it is still done through them.
    It was the bank that made the mistake- I should not be obliged to give them that money back.

    Also if I do give them it back then they probably won't learn from theit mistake. So an argument can be made that me keeping that money is actually beneficial for other customers.
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    If I were you, I would inform the bank straight away, because otherwise my conscience wouldn't have let me be. What if said money belongs to someone who transferred funds to a bank account to purchase a new home or a car and somehow f***ed up the account number by a single digit? Imagine you were that person who just lost 80k. Wouldn't you be absolutely devastated? As some have said before, if you start spending money carelessly, you will be charged under Section 2A of the Theft Act 1968 for retaining/spending money that doesn't belong to you and that could royally screw up your future. If you're at uni and you decide to spend the money, the least of your worries will be the fact that you were expelled. You will end serving time and messing up your future to the point where you will be unhirable if you even try to apply to any administrative jobs because of your criminal record.

    Now that I've put you into perspective, is 80000 pounds really worth it? No, it isn't. Do the right thing and inform your bank ASAP, so they can then proceed to remove the money. But before that, ask from which bank account the money came from. Maybe a relative decided to help you through uni, although there's a 0.0008% chance that that's what happened.
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    Cant they prove it was me that actually took the money out though?
    And if they can- can they prove I knew that money wasn't mine?

    They can't read my mind there is no way they can prove beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law that I knew that money wasn't mine to spend.

    If its black oh well I didn't lose anything.
    They can read patterns of spending. If you usually spend £5 a week on stockpiling pasta, to suddenly spending £2000 or more at a time....well, it's beyond the point of reasonable doubt that you didn't know about that £80,000 in your bank account. There's also a significant legal precedent in the UK.

    "The Answer, [as per the BBC]
    If an amount is too large to be rightfully yours and you knowingly spend it, you're in trouble"

    (Original post by bbc.co.uk)

    The 1968 Theft Act says "A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging toanother with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it".
    It goes on to say "A person is guilty of an offence if - (a) a wrongful credit has been made to an account kept by him or in respect of which he has any right or interest; (b) he knows or believes that the credit is wrongful; and (c) he dishonestly fails to take such steps as are reasonable in the circumstances tosecure that the credit is cancelled."
    The act has been updated over the years but the principle remains the same.


    Yeah...you'd be in significant trouble.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/6966683.stm
    http://www.money.co.uk/guides/can-yo...nk-account.htm
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...aped-jail.html (urgh...I feel dirty for using a daily fail link)

    Admittedly, there seems to be more of a precedent in the US for such a thing, but if you spend one penny of that money that isn't yours, then you would be liable for it.

    However, it does seem you would be able to keep the interest. Doing the right thing, is the best thing.
    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news...p-find-5384740
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    When I checked my account this morning there was £80000 extra in my account. Obviously that is a lot of money. :eek:

    What should I do? I think I will just keep my mouth shut.

    What would happen if the bank found out I had it and didn't say anything?
    You would be jailed.

    (Original post by driftawaay)
    If that was me, I would transfer the money to another account immediately, leave the country, change my appearance and never come back
    So you would drift away.

    (Original post by The Financier)
    Notify the bank asap and whatever you do, DON'T spend it. You can be charged under Section 24A of the Theft Act 1968 for retaining/spending money that doesn't belong to you.
    Banks retain and spend money that does not belong to them. I doubt they can be charged.
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    The shop is owned by nike so it is still done through them.
    It was the bank that made the mistake- I should not be obliged to give them that money back.

    Also if I do give them it back then they probably won't learn from theit mistake. So an argument can be made that me keeping that money is actually beneficial for other customers.
    I'm done with you. If you think you're making the best decision, go for it. If I can't show you the way to go, I'm sure that soon enough the life will. You're making a BIG mistake if the bank made the wrong transaction... Just to remind you that one last time.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Thanks, that's very interesting. I didn't realise that the gap was as wide as that - basically it seems that Hungary has about 1/10th the earnings level of the UK. Is the cost of living in the same proportion, or does it feel like people are poorer, for example, are goods like smartphones, TVs or cars basically the same price as in Western Europe?
    Yeah, smartphones, TVs, cars, all electronics are the same price, we also have the same high street brands as anywhere else, like H&M etc so if you go to a shopping centre, clothes cost the same as in the UK. Food is only marginally cheaper, just yesterday I was thinking of how many things I can buy in Aldi on an hour's minimum wage here, versus how many things I could buy in Aldi on the minimum wage there. Basically I can buy a bag of crisps and a chocolate bar in Aldi on the £1/hour wage there and a lot more on £6.5 in the UK....

    But the biggest expense, housing is a lot cheaper. Anything else is either not cheaper, or cheaper but it's doesn't matter because the wages are so low anyway. Prices are going up like crazy, while wages have gone down significantly 2008. It wasn't always this bad......
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    (Original post by jammy4041)
    There is more chance of a portal to Hell opening up, a cold, rainy night in the middle of Stoke, and then having Hell freeze over than the chance of you not going to jail in such a situation.
    Bad example, that sounds like a standard night in Stoke
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    (Original post by driftawaay)
    Yeah, smartphones, TVs, cars, all electronics are the same price, we also have the same high street brands as anywhere else, like H&M etc so if you go to a shopping centre, clothes cost the same as in the UK. Food is only marginally cheaper, just yesterday I was thinking of how many things I can buy in Aldi on an hour's minimum wage here, versus how many things I could buy in Aldi on the minimum wage there. Basically I can buy a bag of crisps and a chocolate bar in Aldi on the £1/hour wage there and a lot more on £6.5 in the UK....

    But the biggest expense, housing is a lot cheaper. Anything else is either not cheaper, or cheaper but it's doesn't matter because the wages are so low anyway. Prices are going up like crazy, while wages have gone down significantly 2008. It wasn't always this bad......

    You know minimum wage has gone up now right? You should be getting paid £6.70 now, not £6.50 anymore.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    You know minimum wage has gone up now right? You should be getting paid £6.70 now, not £6.50 anymore.
    Oh i didnt know that. Im a student, i dont work.
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    (Original post by driftawaay)
    Oh i didnt know that. Im a student, i dont work.
    I'm a student too but I do work.
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    Call the bank and tell them about the mistake. You'll be honest and responsible and sleep much better!
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    Why is it every thread on tsr there is always some nutjob that shouts troll. :mad:

    I am being serious. How could they charge me with theft? I was giving that money. If somebody came up to you in the street and gave you money and you spent that would you be done for theft? no- so whats the difference here?
    Because it's not yours. it's irrelevant. I don't know why you're questioning it when it's legal fact. That's completely different, that's a gift. Mistakenly transferring money is not a gift. As someone mentioned there's even statue directly related to such situations.
    There would be all the evidence to show you knew it was there (IT logins, the fact you don't usually spend over X££ a week let alone £80k), and regardless if you knew, you would pay it back. Google it if you like, every single person was forced to pay it back.


    I call you a troll because I like to think people aren't stupid enough to think they're allowed to keep it. But I guess they must if it's happened before. Suffice to say, a spending spree feels less great when you spend the next X years paying it back.
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    (Original post by Eggs20)
    And how will they find this thread in the first place?

    And can they prove it was me that was posting?
    Really? As I suggested earlier, you need to find an alternative way to make money, because crime isn't for you. You think the police or other law enforcement agencies couldn't track you down after you've blurted out your intentions on a public website on the internet? Furthermore, while I'm not a legal expert, in the case of £80k randomly being added to your £8k bank balance, I'd imagine the burden would be on you to prove you didn't realise you'd dishonestly spent it, since you'd probably be guilty by default.

    (Original post by Masih ad-Dajjal)
    But why?


    People send money for all sorts of reasons, it makes no sense to be able to say 'sorry I got a couple of digits wrong, can you reverse the transaction?'

    Lol I am right

    http://budgeting.thenest.com/time-fr...fer-33881.html
    Again, I'm not a legal expert, but to me the law on this seems pretty clear. If a large sum of money inexplicably appears in your account, it's pretty obvious to the reasonable person that you would notice something was up.

    Why on earth is making a mistake and expecting it to be corrected so nonsensical? Seems perfectly reasonable to me, and I'd imagine that's part of the underpinning of the law. Human beings make mistakes, and (to use a simplistic but indicative example) if someone processing the funds of, say, The Treasury accidentally mistypes something and the £100M due to go the NHS that month inadvertently ends up in the account of a private person, it's patently more absurd if the law's response is, "Well, it's too late now, Should've got it right the first time!" (and the NHS practically crumbles) than "Clearly a mistake has been made here. Hand the money back, please."
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    same man I got £123,123,123 in my bank randomly
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    If you spend the money or make an attempt to shift it or withdraw it, you will get in a lot of trouble and possibly be liable to criminal prosecution.

    Call the bank to tell them the mistake has been made
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    (Original post by jimmy_looks_2ice)

    Again, I'm not a legal expert, but to me the law on this seems pretty clear. If a large sum of money inexplicably appears in your account, it's pretty obvious to the reasonable person that you would notice something was up.

    Why on earth is making a mistake and expecting it to be corrected so nonsensical? Seems perfectly reasonable to me, and I'd imagine that's part of the underpinning of the law. Human beings make mistakes, and (to use a simplistic but indicative example) if someone processing the funds of, say, The Treasury accidentally mistypes something and the £100M due to go the NHS that month inadvertently ends up in the account of a private person, it's patently more absurd if the law's response is, "Well, it's too late now, Should've got it right the first time!" (and the NHS practically crumbles) than "Clearly a mistake has been made here. Hand the money back, please."
    I'm fairly certain banks treat internal errors differently to someone quoting the wrong swift code and the bank correctly sending the money to the wrong place.
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    (Original post by Masih ad-Dajjal)
    If it's an internal administrative error the bank can take the money back, but if someone was trying to wire the money and used the wrong code, the money is OP's..
    You are embarrassing yourself with this nonsense. If the OP makes any attempt to spend it, he will have committed theft. The money is not his. End of story.

    http://www.money.co.uk/guides/can-yo...nk-account.htm

    Why you can't keep it?Unfortunately, life is not like Monopoly and, if you received a bank error in your favour and spend it, you are far more likely to go directly to jail than collect £200.Keeping any money wrongly credited to your account could lead to you being charged with 'Retaining wrongful credit'. The 1968 Theft act defines this as: "A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it".It goes on to say that: "A person is guilty of an offence if:
    1. 1.a wrongful credit has been made to an account kept by him or in respect of which he has any right or interest;
    2. 2.he knows or believes that the credit is wrongful; and he dishonestly fails to take such steps as are reasonable in the circumstances to secure that the credit is cancelled."
 
 
 
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