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Communication Difficulties Society! watch

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    ]Do you have a communication difficulty or know someone who does?

    I am profoundly deaf since about 18 months old. My deafness has made it difficult to effectively communicate (unless it is in sign language) with hearing peers and family members. However, I consider myself lucky because I had speech therapy when I was about nine or ten (maybe younger) up to the age of 16. I can speak well now. My deafness doesn't stop me from communicating with my family and hearing people I know because I use lip reading and are more aware of how to have good communication with them.

    What is your experience of this?

    Of course online communication is much easier. However I realise that I do love speaking with others face to face (even though I'm awkward). I accept that I am different and show others that I can communicate with them (sadly it is not the same for other deaf people.

    What advice/helpful links could you give to others?If you see a deaf person in school, college or university (or else where) if they look lonely in a classroom please try to make an effort with that person. Even if they cannot speak, use pen and paper! Perhaps you can in a group work session if a deaf person is involved. It may seem to be weird that they might have an interpreter with them, but it'd be nice for them to feel inclusive. I've personally experienced isolation throughout education (school, sixth form and uni), and it was one of the most awful experiences ever. In fact I still experience isolation (probably always will in the future).[/QUOTE]
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    (Original post by ghall)
    Do you have a communication difficulty or know someone who does?

    I am profoundly deaf since about 18 months old. My deafness has made it difficult to effectively communicate (unless it is in sign language) with hearing peers and family members. However, I consider myself lucky because I had speech therapy when I was about nine or ten (maybe younger) up to the age of 16. I can speak well now. My deafness doesn't stop me from communicating with my family and hearing people I know because I use lip reading and are more aware of how to have good communication with them.

    What is your experience of this?

    Of course online communication is much easier. However I realise that I do love speaking with others face to face (even though I'm awkward). I accept that I am different and show others that I can communicate with them (sadly it is not the same for other deaf people.

    What advice/helpful links could you give to others?If you see a deaf person in school, college or university (or else where) if they look lonely in a classroom please try to make an effort with that person. Even if they cannot speak, use pen and paper! Perhaps you can in a group work session if a deaf person is involved. It may seem to be weird that they might have an interpreter with them, but it'd be nice for them to feel inclusive. I've personally experienced isolation throughout education (school, sixth form and uni), and it was one of the most awful experiences ever. In fact I still experience isolation (probably always will in the future).
    Hey! Thanks for sharing your experience and advice, it means a lot :yep: What sort of things did you do in Speech therapy?
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Hey! Thanks for sharing your experience and advice, it means a lot :yep: What sort of things did you do in Speech therapy?
    I learnt how to pronounce certain words by feeling their throat, such as the letter N like nappy (sounds weird I know, but it helps!), visual games which highlights certain things such as silent H etc, practicing verbal communication- she would ask me how my weekend was etc, and if she noticed I wasn't pronouncing certain words probably she would remind me. For example I struggled to say B probably, I think it was the word bee. Z wasn't good for me.
    Oh yes, I remember she provided me with newspaper articles and I had to read out loud.That's all I can think of. I'm sure she covered I found it so valuable because my speech improved so much.
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    (Original post by ghall)
    I learnt how to pronounce certain words by feeling their throat, such as the letter N like nappy (sounds weird I know, but it helps!), visual games which highlights certain things such as silent H etc, practicing verbal communication- she would ask me how my weekend was etc, and if she noticed I wasn't pronouncing certain words probably she would remind me. For example I struggled to say B probably, I think it was the word bee. Z wasn't good for me.
    Oh yes, I remember she provided me with newspaper articles and I had to read out loud.That's all I can think of. I'm sure she covered I found it so valuable because my speech improved so much.
    That's brilliant! I've met quite a few people who are deaf and can't speak, but they can sign. I met someone who had a stroke and was deaf so then lost the ability to sign, that must be so difficult Are you at school, uni, job, or?
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    That's brilliant! I've met quite a few people who are deaf and can't speak, but they can sign. I met someone who had a stroke and was deaf so then lost the ability to sign, that must be so difficult Are you at school, uni, job, or?
    Oh no that's sad I'm a third year student at uni. I'm the only deaf person in my year!
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    (Original post by ghall)
    ] Even if they cannot speak, use pen and paper!
    This is one of the easiest ways (in some ways anyway) for me to communicate. A lot of people have problems understanding my speech and if it's noisy, I don't understand theirs. However, being visually impaired also makes using pen and paper a bit difficult!
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    This is one of the easiest ways (in some ways anyway) for me to communicate. A lot of people have problems understanding my speech and if it's noisy, I don't understand theirs. However, being visually impaired also makes using pen and paper a bit difficult!
    Such a useful tool has anyone got any more long term alternative means of communication like a dynavox or anything?

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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Such a useful tool has anyone got any more long term alternative means of communication like a dynavox or anything?

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    I do know a girl who uses one of these. She has Rett Syndrome which is a form of Autism.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    I do know a girl who uses one of these. She has Rett Syndrome which is a form of Autism.
    It must be helpful! They're quite expensive aren't they? I'm sure they're worth the money though

    I've never heard of Rett Syndrome, I'll have to have a bit of a research about it.

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    I have social anxiety so speaking to people makes me incredibly nervous and hot and shaky and unfortunately is a problem I've dealt with for pretty much a song as I can remember
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    It must be helpful! They're quite expensive aren't they? I'm sure they're worth the money though

    I've never heard of Rett Syndrome, I'll have to have a bit of a research about it.

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    I used to attend a music group. The type of device she has, we helped raise money for her. Hers cost around £5k. Her disability also affects her hands. Her device also allows her to play games and do other things on it.

    Rett only affects females and is progressive. Males don't have it because they die before birth. I seem to remember that Coleen Rooney's (Wayen Rooney's wife) sister died from it.

    There are apps which do allow you to type and these read what you type.
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    Hi, guys. This is my first post on here so I'm feeling shy and nervous. It's nice that there's a thread for communication difficulties.

    Do you have a communication difficulty or know someone who does?
    I have high functioning autism and I'm severely deaf in both ears.

    What is your experience of this?
    My deafness makes it very difficult to speak to participate in a conversation with more than two people and I often have to use sign language to communicate with people who I've not yet learned to lip read. I find it extremely difficult to hear people in crowded and noisy situations. However, I can communicate perfectly well with my family members.

    My autism can cause a lot of anxiety at times, especially if my routine is broken or if I have to interact with new people. I used to only be able to speak fluently to certain people. If I had to speak to someone I didn't know, I would either go completely silent and not be able to speak or I would only whisper. At my previous school, I didn't speak at all but would speak lots at home. I'm slowly starting to come out of this with support from my school (moved to last year) and family. I also have sensory issues (sensitive to high pitched and loud sounds and labels in clothing. Cutting labels out of my clothes has become a habit. I can only eat certain foods because of their textures). I receive speech therapy for my autism. It is easier for me to express myself by writing down my thoughts or through sign language

    What advice/helpful links could you give to others?
    Don't leave out the person with deafness/autism from your conversation.Please make an effort to include them and be patient.

    Speak clearly and normally to a deaf person like how you would with a hearing person. If you speak slowly it distorts speech pattern and makes it difficult to lip read. If the deaf person has no or very little speech, use pen and paper or a note app on your phone/tablet to communicate with them.

    With a person who has autism, speak in clear and concise sentences. It can be confusing if you use similes or metaphors.
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    (Original post by may_1)
    I have social anxiety so speaking to people makes me incredibly nervous and hot and shaky and unfortunately is a problem I've dealt with for pretty much a song as I can remember
    Are you at school, Uni, work, or? How do you find it affects education/work/social life?

    (Original post by AngryDragon97)
    Hi, guys. This is my first post on here so I'm feeling shy and nervous. It's nice that there's a thread for communication difficulties.
    Don't be shy or nervous, we're here to support not judge. Thank you for your post! I'm glad you like it. Merry Christmas by the way
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    (Original post by AngryDragon97)
    Speak clearly and normally to a deaf person like how you would with a hearing person. If you speak slowly it distorts speech pattern and makes it difficult to lip read.
    Interesting. I wasn't aware of this. I used to volunteer and there was a woman who was deaf. All she'd ask was that you'd face her and speak clearly. I know that a friend says he has to talk a little bit louder to his wife. (and must remember to not talk quite so loud to other people!)

    I do remember years ago, telling someone I'm partially sighted. Her response was to talk to me really slowly.
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Don't be shy or nervous, we're here to support not judge. Thank you for your post! I'm glad you like it. Merry Christmas by the way
    Thank you. And Merry Christmas to you too!

    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Interesting. I wasn't aware of this. I used to volunteer and there was a woman who was deaf. All she'd ask was that you'd face her and speak clearly. I know that a friend says he has to talk a little bit louder to his wife. (and must remember to not talk quite so loud to other people!)

    I do remember years ago, telling someone I'm partially sighted. Her response was to talk to me really slowly.
    I should have mentioned in my advice that it helps if you face a deaf person too. I don't know how I forgot that!

    Sometimes, I think some people can come up with the strangest responses. A couple of my friends have been given a Braille menu at restaurants when they've told waiters/waitresses that they're deaf.
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    (Original post by AngryDragon97)

    Sometimes, I think some people can come up with the strangest responses. A couple of my friends have been given a Braille menu at restaurants when they've told waiters/waitresses that they're deaf.
    That's just strange.

    Oh, and I don't mind if you ask me if I need this or that. I'd rather be asked what I need instead of assumptions (sometimes these can be completely wrong) being made.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    That's just strange.

    Oh, and I don't mind if you ask me if I need this or that. I'd rather be asked what I need instead of assumptions (sometimes these can be completely wrong) being made.
    I prefer to be asked what I need as well instead of assumptions which can be completely wrong too. Before, I've had people try to "sign" to me and speaking slowly at the same time with good intentions. It's very awkward when that happens though.
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    (Original post by BurstingBubbles)
    Such a useful tool has anyone got any more long term alternative means of communication like a dynavox or anything?

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    I've tried a few apps (just on a usual tablet, not a dynavox which i'd never head of till this post) and so found my favourites.
    I do try not to use them though because it's quite awquard to have to walk around carrying a tablet out with me all the time, and I don't want to get dependant on it as I do have some speech. However it's REALLY helpful in some situations.

    I have a collection of picture cards which I DO carry everywhere with me and use with speech or to help me start saying something-so I show a picture and then talk to explain.

    Another thing Is I have a colour system. I've got 3 coloured key tags (as in things people put on key rings to label keys) on a lanyard which I always wear. The system is the colour clipped to the lanyard is my current colour and the colours mean different things. It works like traffic lights really:
    Green-I am okay/fine/alright/no problems
    Yellow-something is wrong. It's not more detailed than that and It means I need to be asked what is wrong by my support workers and then to solve the issue. I do sometimes use a picture card if I have one for whatever the problem is as well as yellow.
    Red-whatever was the problem never got fixed, it has got worse or there is lots of problems. Probably means I'm close to meltdown/shutdown or already in one and need quiet time away from people.
    This is probably the best communication system I have and it helps so much. It just annoys me because it depends on support workers knowing about it advance and remembering to look at it.


    I find having Dyspraxia makes pen and paper difficult because I write really slowly so 'talking' takes ages only then to get people tell me they can't read anything of what I've written. I get really annoyed then. Dyslexia doesn't help with this either because spelling words wrong probably doesn't help people to read what I write. I basically learnt that writing is not helpful for me to communicate and I need to do other things. Just unfortunately it ends up being bad behaviour and most people don't understand.
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    Random question, how do people tell when others are joking or being sarcastic? In general I find it easier online as emotes can help if people use them (and I just have more time to think about it) but I keep on getting it wrong at the minute and it can lead to some pretty awkward situations sometimes
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    (Original post by furryface12)
    Random question, how do people tell when others are joking or being sarcastic? In general I find it easier online as emotes can help if people use them (and I just have more time to think about it) but I keep on getting it wrong at the minute and it can lead to some pretty awkward situations sometimes
    This is where I struggle. Being visually impaired, it's really difficult to pick up on facial expressions too, which has led to one or two awkward situations. A friend of mine has come to the conclusion that you can't really wind me up, because whatever you say, I'm just going to take it the wrong way.

    Online is just as bad for the reasons you say. Unless people put in their posts, it's really difficult to generally know how serious they're being.

    But it's gone the other way too - I thought a friend of mine was joking. He wasn't and I got a right telling off.
 
 
 
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