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    (Original post by djn1998)
    Hi,

    Would it be possible to see an example of a first year politics and economics timetable?

    Thanks
    Hi

    Thanks for getting in touch. Please find attached an example of what a normal week could look like for a Stage 1 (LL21) Politics and Economics student.

    Hope that helps

    Best wishes,

    Christina
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    (Original post by NatalieUK)
    Hey, I went to the Business School applicant day but only just thought of a question I'd like to ask students. Do the lecturers really dedicate time to the students? I've heard stories from people at other uni's saying a lot of marketing lecturers are more concerned about their research and their lectures are just out of a book..
    Hi

    Thanks for getting in touch. I contacted the Business School and this was their response:

    In the first year, theMarketing degree programmes concentrate heavily on group work, presentations,professional case-studies on consumer behaviour and developing a criticalperspective on business growth and enterprise.

    The nature of these topicslends itself to an interactive setting, so the lectures, and in particular, theseminars and workshops, are engaging and inclusive, with the lecturersencouraging critique and discussion.
    Being a Russell Groupuniversity, many of the academics are involved in research, allowing those whoare teaching to bring the positive aspects of this to the lecture theatre,encouraging the students to engage in current topics of marketing concepts,rather than purely limiting discussion to course reading and textbooks.Hope that helps
    Best wishes,Christina
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    (Original post by Student1670)
    Hi, a few questions if you don't mind? Newcastle seems to have an excellent reputation for Fine Art. How much contact do students get with tutors? And what preparation is there for life after Uni for a Fine Art student? Also, what advantages do you think there are for a student in Newcastle over one of the London art schools?
    Many thanks


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    Hi

    I contacted the Fine Art team and I've attached their response (because it was too long :P).

    Hope that helps. If you have any other questions you can contact David Butler the admissions tutor at [email protected]

    Best wishes,

    Christina
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx Fine Art.docx (13.7 KB, 97 views)
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    (Original post by Samonia)
    Hello

    Do you offer Unconditional offers for your undergraduates for Computer Science? and if so, what are required for them?

    Thank you
    Hi

    Unconditional offers are sometimes made tostudents with a strong academic record who attend a post application visit dayand make Newcastle their Firm choice.

    Hope that helps

    Best wishes,

    Christina
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    (Original post by Newcastle University)
    Hi

    I contacted the Fine Art team and I've attached their response (because it was too long :P).

    Hope that helps. If you have any other questions you can contact David Butler the admissions tutor at [email protected]

    Best wishes,

    Christina
    Thanks for such a fast response Christina. Unfortunately the attachment doesn't open, could you please try again?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Student1670)
    Thanks for such a fast response Christina. Unfortunately the attachment doesn't open, could you please try again?
    Thanks
    That's odd! Lets try copy and paste:

    All students have a studio tutor who they have regular one-to-one tutorials with. This tutor changes every semester except in final year when you keep the same tutor throughout the year.But students can also have tutorials with other tutors. We operate a surgery tutorial system where students can sign up for tutorials with whoever they want. They might do this because of a tutor’s work or because they want more input. This also applies to visiting lecturers (we have a visiting speaker every week who does a talk, a seminar and two days of tutorials). So they are in control of this and can have more input at times when they feel the need and less when they feel they need that. However, contact with their studio tutor is regular.Students are also taught through group crits (involving staff and students often from other year groups), one-off workshops and regular strands. These will involve artists from outside as well as staff.The first semester of first year involves three strands that students choose from four options: painting, sculpture, printmaking and video/performance. This introduces them to areas they may not have worked in before and to the workshops, technicians and staff across the whole department. Teaching contact during that time is quite intensive.Art History is taught in first and second year through a day each week of two lectures and a seminar. This year involves researching and writing a dissertation. That is taught through meetings with the dissertation supervisor. And there is the option to do an extra critical writing module in fourth year taught in group sessions and tutorials.Professional practice is taught through the LIfeWorkArt programme. In first year this involves weekly visits to studios, galleries and other arts organisations in semester one and organising an exhibition in semester two where students are managing, curating, fundraising, marketing, installation etc etc. Over the next three years they will do projects outside the university: exhibitions, public art, placements, education and community projects, art therapy etc etc. These are driven by the students, can be group or individual projects and are taught through tutorials. On graduation students are going on to be artists, curators, project and event organisers, work in education, community projects, art therapy etc etc as well as going on to postgraduate programmes.Advantages are very much down to why you are choosing to study fine art. But I’d suggest generally what you should look for is: studio space, access to workshops, what the student community is like, how lively the local arts sector is – and what you feel about spending the next three or four years in that city.London is one of the major international art centres and is unlike anywhere else in the UK.Newcastle is a small city with a lot happening in it. It has a large visual arts scene, a lot of which has been developed by graduates from the two universities. Currently a large block in the city centre of empty shops and offices houses four hundred artists, four public galleries, four galleries in studio spaces, a bookshop, a DIY Maker Space, a theatre, a cinema workshop, various arts organisations and a bar run by one of those organisations. For example see: http://thenewbridgeproject.com/ http://vane.org.uk/ http://www.makerspace.org.uk/ And that is only part of the scene e.g. See Baltic http://www.balticmill.com/There are events (previews, screenings, talks, workshops etc) almost every night. Students are very active in that using spaces outside the university. Importantly that arts community is very open and welcoming to students and curators, artists etc regularly attend student exhibitions.So I’d say Newcastle is very definitely a good place to be an art student.
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    Heya, would it be possible to see what a typical timetable for a dental student would be like?

    Thanks a lot
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    (Original post by Newcastle University)
    That's odd! Lets try copy and paste:

    All students have a studio tutor who they have regular one-to-one tutorials with. This tutor changes every semester except in final year when you keep the same tutor throughout the year.But students can also have tutorials with other tutors. We operate a surgery tutorial system where students can sign up for tutorials with whoever they want. They might do this because of a tutor’s work or because they want more input. This also applies to visiting lecturers (we have a visiting speaker every week who does a talk, a seminar and two days of tutorials). So they are in control of this and can have more input at times when they feel the need and less when they feel they need that. However, contact with their studio tutor is regular.Students are also taught through group crits (involving staff and students often from other year groups), one-off workshops and regular strands. These will involve artists from outside as well as staff.The first semester of first year involves three strands that students choose from four options: painting, sculpture, printmaking and video/performance. This introduces them to areas they may not have worked in before and to the workshops, technicians and staff across the whole department. Teaching contact during that time is quite intensive.Art History is taught in first and second year through a day each week of two lectures and a seminar. This year involves researching and writing a dissertation. That is taught through meetings with the dissertation supervisor. And there is the option to do an extra critical writing module in fourth year taught in group sessions and tutorials.Professional practice is taught through the LIfeWorkArt programme. In first year this involves weekly visits to studios, galleries and other arts organisations in semester one and organising an exhibition in semester two where students are managing, curating, fundraising, marketing, installation etc etc. Over the next three years they will do projects outside the university: exhibitions, public art, placements, education and community projects, art therapy etc etc. These are driven by the students, can be group or individual projects and are taught through tutorials. On graduation students are going on to be artists, curators, project and event organisers, work in education, community projects, art therapy etc etc as well as going on to postgraduate programmes.Advantages are very much down to why you are choosing to study fine art. But I’d suggest generally what you should look for is: studio space, access to workshops, what the student community is like, how lively the local arts sector is – and what you feel about spending the next three or four years in that city.London is one of the major international art centres and is unlike anywhere else in the UK.Newcastle is a small city with a lot happening in it. It has a large visual arts scene, a lot of which has been developed by graduates from the two universities. Currently a large block in the city centre of empty shops and offices houses four hundred artists, four public galleries, four galleries in studio spaces, a bookshop, a DIY Maker Space, a theatre, a cinema workshop, various arts organisations and a bar run by one of those organisations. For example see: http://thenewbridgeproject.com/ http://vane.org.uk/ http://www.makerspace.org.uk/ And that is only part of the scene e.g. See Baltic http://www.balticmill.com/There are events (previews, screenings, talks, workshops etc) almost every night. Students are very active in that using spaces outside the university. Importantly that arts community is very open and welcoming to students and curators, artists etc regularly attend student exhibitions.So I’d say Newcastle is very definitely a good place to be an art student.
    Brilliant, thanks!
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    (Original post by preetg97)
    Heya, would it be possible to see what a typical timetable for a dental student would be like?

    Thanks a lot
    Hi

    I contacted the Dental school and this was their response:
    Our students areexpected to attend a mix of lectures, practicals, seminars and clinicalsessions which occur between the hours of 9 and 5, and a student’s day istypically very full during those hours. Here is an example of what a typical day could look like: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/dental/study/undergraduate/day/

    Hope that helps

    Best wishes,


    Christina
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    Hi, would be possible to get an example of a typical timetable for a psychology and business (combined honours) student. Would the chance of being able to do a semester abroad be slim considering I wouldn't be taking a language?

    Thank you!
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    Hiya, was wondering how many people roughly do business management and how many do French at Newcastle? Just to get an idea of what lectures would be like! Also, I'm still not clear on the placement year, are you able to choose both a work placement and study abroad for the year? And does the work placement have to be in a French speaking country or can it be UK? Last question, I know this is probably unlikely but if you are a placement year student is it still possible to do a study abroad semester in your second year? I know of a few people spending parts of their second year in America so was just wondering if this is an added option! Thank you!
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    (Original post by student0771)
    Hi, would be possible to get an example of a typical timetable for a psychology and business (combined honours) student. Would the chance of being able to do a semester abroad be slim considering I wouldn't be taking a language?

    Thank you!
    Hi

    Thanks for getting in touch. It can be difficult to give anaccurate idea of a timetable for a Combined Honours student as it reallydepends on which / how many modules they take from each subject. Typically, if a student was taking 60 credits in each subject (joint), forBusiness this would be split into 3 modules (20 credits per module), howeverPsychology has many ten credits modules, so a student could be taking up to 6classes in Psychology over the year. It would be 60 credits per semester,so it could be one Business class (20 credits) and four Psychology beforeFebruary (40 credits), and then two Business classes (40 credits), and twoPsychology (20 credits) for Semester two (or vice versa). Each classwould typically have one lecture and could be followed by seminars. Timetables are the one of the most difficult aspects to advise CH students onas each can be so different.
    All students can now opt to work/ study abroad (for a year or a semester) regardless of subject, and this canbe Europe or worldwide.
    Hope that helps

    Best wishes,
    Christina
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    Hi everyone!

    I am considering applying to the International Multimedia Journalism MA. Does anyone know anything about this course? Is it good?

    Thanks!
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    Hi.
    I have heard that during the assessed summer school at the Newcastle University students are allocated to strands, such as humanities, sciences etc. Does it mean that for example a law student would have to attend the same lectures and do the same work as someone wishing to study English etc.? Or is it more subject specific despite such a structure?
    Thanks.
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    I have applied to do combined honours next year and I was wondering since combined honours student take the same number of credits as everyone else does it mean we have more work to do than if you were doing just one subject?
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    (Original post by 28657)
    Hi.
    I have heard that during the assessed summer school at the Newcastle University students are allocated to strands, such as humanities, sciences etc. Does it mean that for example a law student would have to attend the same lectures and do the same work as someone wishing to study English etc.? Or is it more subject specific despite such a structure?
    Thanks.
    Hi

    We have 26 subject strands atthe Assessed Summer School including Law, Medicine, English Literature, EnglishLanguage, History, Chemistry, Maths etc. For obvious reasons we can’t have astrand per degree programme but we do group students into the strand mostrelevant to their chosen degree course. For example all applicants to coursesat the Business School will sit a Business subject strand. I hope this helps! If you have any other questions the PARTNERS team are just an email away: [email protected]

    Best wishes,

    Christina
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    (Original post by Charlotte0610)
    I have applied to do combined honours next year and I was wondering since combined honours student take the same number of credits as everyone else does it mean we have more work to do than if you were doing just one subject?
    Hi Charlotte,

    I contacted the school and this was their response:
    I can see how they would thinkthis, due to them taking two or three subjects. However, as they are taking thesame amount of credits as single honours students (120 credits), they willactually have the same amount of work, just spread over two three subjects. So,for example, a Single Honours Sociology student would take 120 credits inSociology, whereas a Combined Honours student studying Sociology and Philosophywould take 60 credits in Sociology, and 60 credits in Philosophy (a module canbe worth 10 or 20 credits) All student, whether they are single honours,joint honours, or Combined Honours will are taught together in the same classesas they can choose to do the same modules, so all teaching and assessments arefair.Hope that helps
    Best wishes,
    Christina
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    Hi,
    Do you have a sample timetable for Chemical Engineering?
    Thanks
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    Hey, i'm due to attend the partners summer school in summer which i'm free to attend. However, i may be going on holiday for a month afterwards so would have to complete my project while on holiday. Is this advisable to do so? If not i won't go on holiday. Is the project intense, what does it entail? I've applied to study geography so will likely do a humanities project.
    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by IvoryToast)
    Hi,
    Do you have a sample timetable for Chemical Engineering?
    Thanks
    Hiya,

    I asked the School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials but unfortunately they didn't have an example timetable to provide.

    So, I had a look at the University's online timetabling service and was able to generate the image below by asking for all Stage 1 modules for Chemical Engineering BEng for a specific week. So that should hopefully give you a rough idea!

    All the best,

    Persephone

    Name:  Chemical Engineering.png
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