Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by PetrosAC)
    Nay, for reasons mentioned already. We should be looking to improve state schools rather than bringing down private schools

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hear hear. Nay.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aph)
    Would this not lead to effectively banning university's? Nay anyway
    No
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Hang on... So you want to steal the assets of charity and private business now.

    These schools won't necessarily stay in existence, they may simply be sold.
    read the bill.
    Offline

    18
    Nay. This is an attack on children.

    Are there enough spaces for the children to go to other schools? How much will this cost? What will the schools who received assistance from private schools do without it?

    This is pure ideological drivel with no proper thought for the consequences of something like this.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Nay, I made my sentiments clear about this bill, and in no way am I supporting this. Sorry.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    How about no

    Almost as stupid as scrapping tuition fees

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's clearly an inflammatory statement. What the Tories have done is beyond understanding or reason. We now have no maintenance grants and universities can increase tuition fees to whatever they like. So students like us are screwed for the next 3 years - at least.
    It's easy for those who aren't going to have to battle through it to say.
    The plan could be funded either by a 7% rise in national insurance for those earning over £50,000 a year, a 2.5% higher corporation tax, or by slowing the pace at which the deficit is reduced.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by nebelbon)
    Nay. This is an attack on children.

    Are there enough spaces for the children to go to other schools? How much will this cost? What will the schools who received assistance from private schools do without it?

    This is pure ideological drivel with no proper thought for the consequences of something like this.
    Hear hear!
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by United1892)
    Aye.
    My problem with what you've said is that private schools aren't really able to recruit teachers 'of a higher calibre'. From my own experience and that of some of my friends who went to Eton, Ampleforth, Downside, Westminster, Stonyhurst and so on, the teachers aren't always better - some of them would never survive assessment in the state sector.

    The main reason for the students doing better is because their parents get them private tutors for after school, and partly that the private sector's syllabi are significantly ahead of the state sector's up to GCSE. For example, those of a lower and higher ability than me had tutors for every subject at Common Entrance and did no revision but simply increased their hours with them. By revising at a good standard I achieved higher than a few of the students who were of a 'higher calibre' and some who were clearly less able in learning were able to achieve higher results - but only because their tutors, who wouldn't be with them next year, forced them through every past paper there was instead of attempting to actually learn the subject. In this way they got into some of the "highest-achieving" schools but struggled or failed to keep up.
    Moreover, in the case of the private sector's syllabi being slightly ahead of the state sector's, what I myself learnt in year 8 for Common Entrance was the same a sibling was learning in year 10 for GCSEs. Also, in languages like Latin, the teacher rushed through the subject and only those who had tutors were able to keep up unless they revised hard like myself.


    Just my penny's worth.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Rakas21)
    Not all children there have an advantage without merit. A lot take entrance exams for example so are no worse than grammars. Many private schools also offer scholarships, something that should be extended.
    However, the scholarships very rarely will be 100%, I was trying to get into a private sixth form college, but the best they could offer was 50% and that was after me paying an application fee for them to even consider me. That 50% "discount" would have required me getting 100% A*-A in my GCSEs too.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by United1892)
    It's impossible to compete with private schools as they simply have far too much money.
    Not at all, most state schools do as well, if not, better than private schools. I agree that something must be done, but a ban isn't the right way to go about it in my opinion.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by United1892)
    If only a certain group has the liberty to send their child to certain school then it is merely privilege. I don't understand how any can think we can compete with private schools we simply don't have the cash. I'd also point out that private schools massively infringe upon equality of opportunity.
    We do compete with private schools though, but that doesn't mean we should take our foot off the gas, we need to press on and deliver an even better education for those without the £7,000 a term to spend on education. Thing is, we can fund our schools, but this goes down to more than funding, we need to keep more of our teachers in the UK, we need to improve our national curriculum and we need to build more schools. Having 30 kids in a class isn't right, I'd like to see 25 pupil classrooms.
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    Nay.

    The fact is there is no good argument for nationalising private schools. Private school pupils in fact are beneficial to the education budget as a whole, as their parents still have to pay into the pot, but they choose to not receive funding out of it. Were all private school pupils forced to attend state schools, the education budget would need to rise just to provide equivalent funding to now.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    Nay.

    The fact is there is no good argument for nationalising private schools. Private school pupils in fact are beneficial to the education budget as a whole, as their parents still have to pay into the pot, but they choose to not receive funding out of it. Were all private school pupils forced to attend state schools, the education budget would need to rise just to provide equivalent funding to now.
    Means-tested pricing on state schools, free for those on less than ~£100k?
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Means-tested pricing on state schools, free for those on less than ~£100k?
    Not in favour. Higher earners already pay more through higher taxation.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    Not in favour. Higher earners already pay more through higher taxation.
    Ah, but they don't pay as much as they should. This also makes income tax avoidance for non-doms much more difficult as they're paying it for a mandatory service.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I support.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    That's clearly an inflammatory statement. What the Tories have done is beyond understanding or reason. We now have no maintenance grants and universities can increase tuition fees to whatever they like. So students like us are screwed for the next 3 years - at least.
    It's easy for those who aren't going to have to battle through it to say.
    The plan could be funded either by a 7% rise in national insurance for those earning over £50,000 a year, a 2.5% higher corporation tax, or by slowing the pace at which the deficit is reduced.
    They can increase fees to whatever they like? That's news to me.
    They have done away with grants, and not given any financial hit to students, and have leveled out the playing field and not assuming that parents will support their children well enough, or even are able to.

    (Original post by United1892)
    However if privates exist then Eton will still exist and would still be a problem. I'd still point out they're not competed with easily otherwise we'd have been doing it for years.
    Yet again, I put to you that by this logic we should not have Oxbridge, after all, they put those who didn't even manage RG at a massive disadvantage.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Yet again, I put to you that by this logic we should not have Oxbridge, after all, they put those who didn't even manage RG at a massive disadvantage.
    We should have Oxbridge, but Oxbridge grads should earn the same as any other person.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    We should have Oxbridge, but Oxbridge grads should earn the same as any other person.
    We aren't at to each according to their need, from each according to their ability just yet, people should be paid what they are worth, just like any other commodity or resource.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    We aren't at to each according to their need, from each according to their ability just yet, people should be paid what they are worth, just like any other commodity or resource.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The key words.

    Also, what currently happens has no bearing on what is ethical.
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 11, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.