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Are you wearing a poppy this week? watch

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    (Original post by Novascope)
    But this is all new. Where was all this recognition years ago? There are still many people who are unaware of the extra help this country had in the war. Like I said, until it's mentioned more in schools and stuff to make people aware then I'll probably wear one. No need to get snappy with me, all I said was I'd like to see a bit more recognition. But hey clearly that's only being done now.
    Woah Woah, wasn't being snappy at all, it was a genuine question.

    The contribution of those sections of society has been well known since day one. All those sides were involved in the very first victory parade in 1946. I get that you think wider knowledge of their participation could be better, but wider knowledge of the entire thing is lacking these days, not just their involvement.

    The people who don't know now are likely to be the same people who simply don't care.
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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    Learned about it in school in the 90s and my parents, aunts and uncles learned about it in the 1950s, 60s and 70s. I'm not really sure where you're getting your information from.
    I never did, a lot of people I know never learnt about it either. Growing up I only thought it was British people who fought in the war. I had no idea they had help from ethnic minorities. I only found out myself just through personal research this year. History lessons never mentioned any of those war heroes.

    (Original post by Drewski)
    Woah Woah, wasn't being snappy at all, it was a genuine question.


    The contribution of those sections of society has been well known since day one. All those sides were involved in the very first victory parade in 1946. I get that you think wider knowledge of their participation could be better, but wider knowledge of the entire thing is lacking these days, not just their involvement.

    The people who don't know now are likely to be the same people who simply don't care.
    Fair enough. I get where you're coming from, but even simple things like advertisements for Remembrance Day, merchandise, posters etc only ever really portray the white men who fought. Me not wanting to wear a poppy really shouldn't be an issue to anyone tbh. It's not like I'm saying people shouldn't wear poppies altogether...
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    (Original post by Novascope)
    I never did, a lot of people I know never learnt about it either. Growing up I only thought it was British people who fought in the war. I had no idea they had help from ethnic minorities. I only found out myself just through personal research this year. History lessons never mentioned any of those war heroes.
    This is a fair point. As far as people from my generation are concerned, I think our knowledge of the second world war (at least) is generally pretty good because it was our grandparents generation that lived and fought through it. We grew up with war films on every Christmas, learned about it in school and heard about it from our parents and grandparents.
    The sacrifice made by ethnic minorities was well covered, at least in my and my peers experience, as it is inseparable from the overall struggle against fascism.

    Dear knows what they teach kids in school these days.

    But yeah, if you don't want to wear a poppy, that's fine, but to think that the sacrifice of ethnic minority soldiers is just forgotten is, as far as I'm concerned, off the mark.


    (I hope it doesn't sound like I'm having a go. I'm not)
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    (Original post by Novascope)
    I never did, a lot of people I know never learnt about it either. Growing up I only thought it was British people who fought in the war. I had no idea they had help from ethnic minorities. I only found out myself just through personal research this year. History lessons never mentioned any of those war heroes.

    Fair enough. I get where you're coming from, but even simple things like advertisements for Remembrance Day, merchandise, posters etc only ever really portray the white men who fought. Me not wanting to wear a poppy really shouldn't be an issue to anyone tbh. It's not like I'm saying people shouldn't wear poppies altogether...
    No, I get what you're saying. I think it's just one of those things. Those adverts are designed to appeal to the majority of the public, so do so in the way you mention.

    When you look into it is very easy to see the different nationalities involved, just requires that bit of personal interest - as it does for every bit of it. I don't think that's a fault of the institution though.
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    (Original post by little_wizard123)
    I can remember people in my own head - I don't need to show everybody that I'm thinking of those who died in order to do it. Got shouted at once for not wearing one; I'm pretty sure a lot of people just do it to try to give the impression they care more than others. It sounds cynical but it's a larger scale version of when people change their Facebook photos to show support of some 'popular' cause. Well done on giving 20p to buy your poppy, just so you can look down on those who don't have one. I tend to give money but don't want the poppy - I'm not against the symbol etc, it's just that I don't feel the need to tell everybody I'm donating or thinking about it.

    I'm strange.

    Note: Clearly, not everybody is like that.
    I agree with you. We shouldn't need to advertise what we are/aren't thinking simply to gain validation from others.


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    (Original post by TheThiefOfBagdad)
    This is a fair point. As far as people from my generation are concerned, I think our knowledge of the second world war (at least) is generally pretty good because it was our grandparents generation that lived and fought through it. We grew up with war films on every Christmas, learned about it in school and heard about it from our parents and grandparents.
    The sacrifice made by ethnic minorities was well covered, at least in my and my peers experience, as it is inseparable from the overall struggle against fascism.

    Dear knows what they teach kids in school these days.

    But yeah, if you don't want to wear a poppy, that's fine, but to think that the sacrifice of ethnic minority soldiers is just forgotten is, as far as I'm concerned, off the mark.


    (I hope it doesn't sound like I'm having a go. I'm not)
    Nah I don't think you're having a go, you make a fair point. My original post wasn't intended to sound bitter or anything, I just personally thought it would be nice to see more recognition, but I was corrected and happy to know that it did happen yesterday and today in a pleasant way. But it does seem that in terms of education some schools are given more information on it (like yourself) compared to schools like the ones I went to.
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    (Original post by Zargabaath)
    Why? Surely the money is going to be more helpful then standing around with your head bowed.
    Give some money as well, there's always collections at memorial services.
    There's no reason you shouldn't wear a poppy, but the remembrance it symbolises is more important than a plastic poppy.
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    I'll be wearing a white poppy. These serve to commemorate and acknowledge the lives lost at war but promote the idea of Peace rather than conflict, and symbolise a fight against fighting.

    You can find them at this website :

    http://www.ppu.org.uk/whitepoppy/
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    The difference is what I said is true. Left wingers oppose our armed forces, fact. Left wingers oppose the red poppy, fact. Left wingers hate and oppose the monarchy, fact. Left wingers oppose all forms of military intervention, fact. Is there anything I said which is not true?
    I'm a leftwinger and I don't oppose our armed forces. Every male in my family for the past four generations has been in the army. My little brother plans to sign up when he turns 17.

    I don't oppose the red poppy. I prefer the white poppy, but I appreciate the sacrifice of our armed forces.

    I don't hate the monarchy but I do oppose it. I don't believe that one family should be in a position of power and influence merely due to accident of birth.

    I oppose most forms of military intervention, but I support some forms simply because the alternative may be too grave to allow. One example is an enforced no fly zone over Syria. This is military intervention, but doing so would force Assad to return to the negotiating table. This is supported by the organisation Planet Syria.

    Yes, everything you said is untrue. What I said is supported by most leftwingers.
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    (Original post by Gears265)
    Find me a left winger who does not support all that. It defeats the whole purpose of being left wing
    Found you one! :five:

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    Heelll to the no.
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    No. I think it's quite ridiculous and basically encouraging patriotism and other forms of civil religion that I strongly dislike.
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    Yesyesyesyesyes¡! Ofc I am. :woo: I'll buy my poppy then I'll wear it for around 30 mins before it falls off.

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    (Original post by LizzyDymond)
    I'll be wearing a white poppy. These serve to commemorate and acknowledge the lives lost at war but promote the idea of Peace rather than conflict, and symbolise a fight against fighting.

    You can find them at this website :

    http://www.ppu.org.uk/whitepoppy/
    The red poppy is not promoting war. Do bear in mind the origin of it, which is from World War 1 where most were conscripts who had no choice in the matter. I don't appreciate the inference that these people were war mongerers
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    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    To be fair, you've probably been here long enough to expect that.
    It never ceases to amaze me though.

    I mean, I know the odd person like that exists, but I've never come such a lot of people IRL who say things like 'I don't wear poppies because war is like so last century'.
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    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    The red poppy is not promoting war. Do bear in mind the origin of it, which is from World War 1 where most were conscripts who had no choice in the matter. I don't appreciate the inference that these people were war mongerers
    Oh I wasn't suggesting that these people are war mongering at all! I'm sorry if it came across this way. I also didn't mean that the red poppy promoted war. What the White Poppy symbolises is the rejection of all killing in war, as the red poppy has become overly political to many. Both poppies commemorate the brave men and women who died in conflict in equal measure.
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    (Original post by LizzyDymond)
    Oh I wasn't suggesting that these people are war mongering at all! I'm sorry if it came across this way. I also didn't mean that the red poppy promoted war. What the White Poppy symbolises is the rejection of all killing in war, as the red poppy has become overly political to many. Both poppies commemorate the brave men and women who died in conflict in equal measure.
    But again, when you say that bit in bold it does make it sound like you believe the red poppy isn't against killing, which simply isn't the case.

    And also, let's not pretend that the pacifist movement that began the white poppy - within what is now The co-operative group - isn't political, because it is.

    I'd also argue that the white poppy doesn't commemorate them equally as the funds raised from it don't generally go to support those affected by conflict.
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    I want to but I'm not bothered to go out and buy it so I might just give my dad some money to donate for me.
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    I will be, I dont have much choice considering I have to play the last post on rememberance day for some event though
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    No. Give money by all means but its "virtue signaling" of the worst kind.
 
 
 
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