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    (Original post by TheAmazingETF)
    Wrong, bolded.

    IB is very open to most universities and degree types (nowadays), medicine not so much.

    IBD/LevFin i agree the work is soul crushing most of the time, but not always. There's days where you have **** all to do.
    Bugle bracket IB and MBB Consulting is just on another planet to the average medic. The average medic isn't half as clever, sadly. There are a few medics in a few select specialities that are genuinely smart and could have done anything they wanted but most of them could never have cut it those two places - I speak from looking at the friends I have that work for McKinsey, BCG and GS - they're just so smart compared to most of the medics I meet.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Bugle bracket IB and MBB Consulting is just on another planet to the average medic. The average medic isn't half as clever, sadly. There are a few medics in a few select specialities that are genuinely smart and could have done anything they wanted but most of them could never have cut it those two places - I speak from looking at the friends I have that work for McKinsey, BCG and GS - they're just so smart compared to most of the medics I meet.
    MBB, yes. IB nowadays is so open as ****, any decent lad will get in with the right experience, even at non target universities.

    The average IB'er isn't clever imo, they just learnt the way to BS in competency interviews.
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    (Original post by TheAmazingETF)
    MBB, yes. IB nowadays is so open as ****, any decent lad will get in with the right experience, even at non target universities.

    The average IB'er isn't clever imo, they just learnt the way to BS in competency interviews.
    Hmm well may be you know best, I haven't met that many people working in BB IB tbh
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Hmm well may be you know best, I haven't met that many people working in BB IB tbh
    It's funny because i know loads of lads at semi targets and non targets landing multiple offers at BBs including GS, MS, JPM etc.

    I could give examples from my own experience but for the sake of privacy i can only just give you my word...

    Tbh IB really isn't worth the struggle nowadays, So many better ventures to go for in consulting & tech.
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    (Original post by Justmoll28)
    if its about the whole pay and striking, i mean, you are still a junior doctor so why dont you just have a career swerve while youre still young? simples
    He did: unfortunately, it turned out to be more of a 'career doughnut'.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Bugle bracket IB
    Given your track-record of blowing your own trumpet, you should be if anything vastly over-qualified.
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    (Original post by Ethereal World)
    Just recently he seems more genuine on here and although the jokey stuff is funny I like the sincerity too. :adore: the member of the year 2k15.
    (Original post by acupofgreentea)
    I agree. :yep: It's because he's being genuine a lot more often now, I think.
    Thanks for your support
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    (Original post by Profesh)
    a
    Given your track-record of blowing your own trumpet, you should be if anything vastly over-qualified.
    lol two in a row
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Bugle bracket IB and MBB Consulting is just on another planet to the average medic. The average medic isn't half as clever, sadly. There are a few medics in a few select specialities that are genuinely smart and could have done anything they wanted but most of them could never have cut it those two places - I speak from looking at the friends I have that work for McKinsey, BCG and GS - they're just so smart compared to most of the medics I meet.
    Well most medics are above average sponges who are supposed to be empathetic and good communicators. Different skills required for different jobs really.
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    (Original post by Xotol)
    Well most medics are above average sponges who are supposed to be empathetic and good communicators. Different skills required for different jobs really.
    Have you worked in Cardiology or Neurosurgery yet? lol omg

    Its so different. I spent my whole life in T&O - what a mistake.

    The Cardiology registrars are some of the brightest people I have ever met.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Have you worked in Cardiology or Neurosurgery yet? lol omg

    Its so different. I spent my whole life in T&O - what a mistake.

    The Cardiology registrars are some of the brightest people I have ever met.
    Really? I was considering T&O as a possible career path :s

    Though I'm doing so much research on cancer i figure i may as well just do that. Experiences with oncologists?
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    (Original post by Xotol)
    Really? I was considering T&O as a possible career path :s

    Though I'm doing so much research on cancer i figure i may as well just do that. Experiences with oncologists?
    Very little I'm afraid - mainly because their involvement in in-patient medicine is limited - they sometimes come and do a patient review here and there - its mostly an outpatient speciality.

    I wouldn't be put off by T&O because of what I say. Its not just the people that attract me to Cardiology, theres lots of things. I love Primary PCI, i find the ECG extremely interesting, I love the way we have our own semi-critical-care unit in the form of CCU. I just find the whole package so cool lol
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    (Original post by redferry)
    The first paragraph is just silly imo, pay is not, and in my opinion should not be, proportional to how long you train. Otherwise architects and academics would earn ridiculous amounts. Sadly for those of us within those disciplines we generally earn peanuts, and not just in the first 5-10 years of our careers either.

    Many manual and vocational jobs are very important and should be paid as such. Don't pretend doctors went into this for the money, they went into it because they enjoy the profession, or at least thought they might.
    Yeah, there are pther professions out there that are judt as important i didnt not deny that.
    And i didnt say that doctors went into it for the money, if you cared to read properly i said quite the opposite. I said that doctors wouldnt be doctors if they were in it for the money.
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    (Original post by ATLHustler)
    Yeah, there are pther professions out there that are judt as important i didnt not deny that.
    And i didnt say that doctors went into it for the money, if you cared to read properly i said quite the opposite. I said that doctors wouldnt be doctors if they were in it for the money.
    Well then time spent studying should be irrelevant to pay then.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Bugle bracket IB and MBB Consulting is just on another planet to the average medic. The average medic isn't half as clever, sadly. There are a few medics in a few select specialities that are genuinely smart and could have done anything they wanted but most of them could never have cut it those two places - I speak from looking at the friends I have that work for McKinsey, BCG and GS - they're just so smart compared to most of the medics I meet.
    Pretty much 90% of the smartest kids from my school went on to become doctors. I think it's more common among girls than blokes though. Such a waste of intellect imo
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    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    If you mean what I think you mean...

    I'm going to be a physiotherapist - I'm going to have it a lot easier than I currently do. This isn't a permanent fixture for me but it is for most of the people that I work with. They are hard working caring people and frankly if it wasn't for their work this country would be a mess because there are thousands of elderly people with no one to care for them but underpaid and overworked care assistants.

    They do the right thing by being loyal to their duty of care despite terrible pay and awful conditions. Whether or not I'm a carer (I won't be very soon) I will defend those workers and hold them in high regard because they put up with a lot and they don't let any of it jeopardize patient care by walking out. I've done it for a year - a lot of them have done it for 15+ and they still put patients first. They have worse conditions and pay than doctors could even imagine and they don't walk out.

    The pay and conditions of doctors, yes I know they vary but generally, are cushy compared to that of carers and other health care workers who don't strike. If they can't put patients first on those kinds of salaries with those conditions then I question their suitability for the health care profession.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well of course the pay would be much higher than that of a carer... as a doctor you go though several years of training/exams, which continues throughout their career.

    Last time doctors striked were 40 years ago. Working conditions was never great, but it will get much worse in August if this contract goes through, which is why I'm happy doctors are finally standing up for themselves and for their patients.

    It's also about patient safety. They are planning on removing the safeguards to monitor the hours junior doctors are working. Overworked doctors can make errors and they cannot afford it, since they make life or death decisions. And if something goes wrong, who's to blame, that doctor. They are not robots. They cannot be expected to work such ridiculous hours.
    Also, why penalise then for doing research? Should we not encourage it?

    Ultimately, this isn't about the doctors though... Tories have a plan for the NHS... and it'll be soon completely privatised.

    The job of a carer is pretty straightforward in terms of the complexities of tasks (HCA for 3 years). We have worse pay than doctors because we didn't do several years of training, nor do we make life/death decisions. We may not strike, but I know several people who have quit, which is sad. But like someone has already said, just because carers have it bad, does not mean doctors/nurses/teachers/police should either.

    You don't defend this field by having a go at other health professionals, that's hardly defending... it's more like "if I can't have it, you can't either" sort of a thing... if you really care about carers, you can stand up for them by fighting for better conditions.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Well then time spent studying should be irrelevant to pay then.
    note i never said otherwise.
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    (Original post by Awesome Genius)
    Have you worked in Cardiology or Neurosurgery yet? lol omg

    Its so different. I spent my whole life in T&O - what a mistake.

    The Cardiology registrars are some of the brightest people I have ever met.
    T&O guys must be bright too though, right? Competitive specialty...

    You've done CST right? So what do you do from there to get into Cardiology, do you have to do CMT, hence "wasting" 2 years?
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    Can't you just pick up something to eat from the morgue?
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    (Original post by Xotol)
    I am literally quoting you. You made this exact assertion less than a day ago and have continually contradicted yourself since
    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    We're more overworked, understaffed and underpaid than junior doctors and we have lives in our hands too - do you see us striking and leaving our patients etc? No.
    (Original post by Xotol)
    You have since clarified that you are a physio, so you are, in effect, arguing with yourself. Some strong comprehension skills on display, making the physios proud
    (Original post by somethingbeaitiful)
    Overworked and understaffed? Got any evidence of the that? If anything, band 5 rotational physio roles in the NHS were oversubscribed as recent as 2007/08.
    I can't tell if you're deliberately trying to misrepresent what I've said or if you've genuinely mis-read this thread.

    I'm a carer. I currently work as a carer. I'm beginning my Physio degree this September. I am not a Physiotherapist. I made that clear in my posts and it's also in my profile. You asked me why I would chose Physio as a career when it's paid less than medicine and physios (according to you) are overworked/understaffed. I asked you for your evidence of the latter.

    As for my comprehension skills, I don't think mine should be under the microscope in this instance.


    (Original post by Xotol)
    Somehow I suspect that decision wasn't entirely yours to make...
    What exactly does that mean?


    (Original post by Xotol)
    Income contingency does not wipe out the pure volume of debt we are under, nor the amount of time we spent studying in med school. http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advic...s,_study_finds
    You chose to study a 4/5/6 year degree (depending on grad entry/regular 5 year/foundation year). You chose to take on that debt when you accepted your place at medical school.

    (Original post by Xotol)
    As a med student in London who is forced to live away from home and also to borrow the maximum maintenance loans because my family simply don't have enough money, I am going to end up with nearly £100,000 worth of debt after my 6 years are up. It is simply not comparable to other professions.
    You were not forced to live in London. You were not forced into £100,000 of debt. If you did your research before you accepted your place you would have known the amount of debt and you would have known that you'd have to relocate. If you didn't like those things you could have chosen another degree. You have a choice. You were not forced. Also, you say this is about not signing up for a degree to be met with a new contract and then you talk about the time it took to get your degree/the hard work/the debt. So which is it?

    (Original post by Xotol)
    And I didn't sign up for medicine knowing that this contract would be imposed on us. Funnily enough, it will be us medical students who are hit the hardest come graduation if things don't change - we dont have pay protection. No wonder med school applications are falling year on year, and here we are in a climate where there is a considerable shortage of doctors. Clearly something is wrong here, and the worst thing possible we could do is stand idly by watching it happen
    There's a difference between standing idly by and walking out.

    (Original post by Xotol)
    I was going to respond to the rest of your drivel, but just realised that i really don't have time nor patience.
    This just sums up your whole approach to me - churlish.

    (Original post by Xotol)
    HOWEVER, you did make me laugh when my quoted name somehow went from Xotol -> xotol -> xytol -> Cyril in your post. God forbid you ever encounter my real name
    Hilarious I'm sure. If you'd looked - you'd see I posted off the mobile app where it's very tricky to multi-quote the same user in one reply so I did it all manually with predictive typing - after an 8 hour late shift. But there we are. I may as well have not bothered since you're obviously not interested in a discussion about the topic and much more interested in trying to pick me apart.
 
 
 
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