Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Which people?
    As far as I'm aware, you'll just have to practice writing neater in your own time. The same goes for people who take long to finish exams, they'll have to do timed practice exams in their own time.
    I didn't say I thought it was fair, I was just pointing out that people get it. The preferred option if a candidate's handwriting is illegible (or slow) is to give the candidate a word processor but it is possible within the rules to give them extra time in order for them to have time to make it legible. In my experience they just write more but still illegibly.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Muttley79)
    I've been a SENCo and we are very strict with these applications.
    Some are, some aren't. We get students joining our sixth form from many different schools. Looking at those who got access arrangements and why at GCSE you can see that the rules are applied very differently in different schools.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I really don't know. I do think people abusing the system isn't a huge problem so it's not something that needs to be worried about too much, I don't think you can just roll up and demand a test, your school will identify you based on how you work in class and I doubt many people would want to cheat in that way. Most school age students would just want to be normal. It is hard to accept because I think most people would do better in exams if they had an extra half hour!

    Generally I don't know how I feel about it. I had access arrangements in my exams (rest breaks and separate room) and I wouldn't have been able to achieve what I did without them without them, I think I would probably have failed most of my exams so I certainly understand why access arrangements exist. However, I think my difficulties (in theory) were things which would hopefully not be an issue by the time I reached the workplace whereas if you take 50% as long as everyone else to do a task, or can't read anything for yourself you simply aren't as good a worker and maybe exams should reflect that. Emphasis on the maybe, I don't know the extent of allowances which need to be made in the workplace and I do still feel uncomfortable with the idea that you fail a maths test because you couldn't read the question or something when your maths knowledge is solid...
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Compost)
    I didn't say I thought it was fair, I was just pointing out that people get it. The preferred option if a candidate's handwriting is illegible (or slow) is to give the candidate a word processor but it is possible within the rules to give them extra time in order for them to have time to make it legible. In my experience they just write more but still illegibly.
    They shouldn't get it.
    The regulations clearly state that you don't get extra time just for sloppy handwriting
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by caitlinford3)
    Definitely, if your brain doesn't work as quick as the 'average student' then you should be given extra time so your brain has time to function in the same way as the 'average student'.
    I agree with extra time for disabilities, but not for this reason. If your brain is slow, then you do a different paper that is tailored for you i.e. a foundation paper. The questions tend to be shorter and more direct so thought processing is easier.

    If you have sight problems, coordination problems, bowel and bladder problems, ADHD etc. then you should be allowed extra time since these are problems with writing answers and not processing the question.

    However if your brain is slow to process, then obviously you are less able to understand the question than someone else (i.e. someone has to repeat the same thing to you many times for you to process it) so you should only do exam papers which you can understand/ do well in.

    For example, if someone is very slow to process what a maths question is asking this is the same as being 'less able' at maths and should be reflected in the grade.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    The regulations clearly state that you don't get extra time just for sloppy handwriting
    They do?

    Like most of these problems - and the reason it is impossible to make access arrangements fair for everyone - is that life is never as straightforward as we'd like it to be. You can get extra time for writing slowly. If you write slowly to make your handwriting legible then you can qualify for extra time. However, the recommended access arrangement for rubbish handwriting is a word processor.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Perhaps you should look into applying for extra time then! You might need it. As I understand it, most people are done when their time runs out.
    Not all exams. I don't think I NEED it even though i would like it. I'm talking about English Language and heavy writing subjects (most people seem to be writing until the last minute).
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by truemiscer)
    no, as you don't get extra for a job and you cannot compare like for like between people.
    Yes but generally in most occupations you don't have to sit exams! If someone has extra time because of dyslexia then they would probably choose a job where writing is minimal however in order to get the majority of jobs you need grades and in order to achieve grades you need to sit exams. That's one of the reasons BTEC's were introduced. To allow people with differing skills (e.g who may exceed in Science but not with their writing) to have a chance at proving their intelligence in a different way.) Written exams are a very old fashioned way of measuring intelligence.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xylas)
    I agree with extra time for disabilities, but not for this reason. If your brain is slow, then you do a different paper that is tailored for you i.e. a foundation paper. The questions tend to be shorter and more direct so thought processing is easier.

    If you have sight problems, coordination problems, bowel and bladder problems, ADHD etc. then you should be allowed extra time since these are problems with writing answers and not processing the question.

    However if your brain is slow to process, then obviously you are less able to understand the question than someone else (i.e. someone has to repeat the same thing to you many times for you to process it) so you should only do exam papers which you can understand/ do well in.

    For example, if someone is very slow to process what a maths question is asking this is the same as being 'less able' at maths and should be reflected in the grade.
    Actually that's not always true. If your just stupid then yes, but there's many other causes of low processing speeds. As I mentioned above, my autism gives me a slow processing speed. However, my autism has also given me an IQ of about 150. It's enabled me to intuitively understand subjects like maths, chemistry and physics which for others are really difficult (though it's butchered my understanding of subjects like English and drama). I don't mean to brag but there's no way you can say my slow processing speed is because I'm stupid and that I should be doing foundation papers when I actually find things like A level a doddle.

    Autism has been shown to cause genius levels of IQ as well as slower processing speeds so your statement is quite false.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by richpanda)
    No, it's completely unfair. That's not even counting the thousands of people who are perfectly capable but get extra time!
    Very ignorant comment. True occasionally people that are allowed extra time don't need it but the majority do. That's why you have to undergo tests to prove that you need the extra time or a scribe, separate room etc. We all have different abilities and some people are luckier than others in life.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ♥Samantha♥)
    I think there shouldn't be extra time after secondary school. Like why give extra time in university that's not teaching you to deal with real life. Like if your going to be say a doctor, if you have a dying patient who needs surgery you can't just go "soz I'm dyslexic give me 25% extra time to think this through".

    Also at my old school they would literally diagnose anyone with dyslexia because they got extra funding for every pupil with SEN. It was so annoying like some people obviously don't need it but get it anyway. In-school counsellors shouldn't diagnose kids there's a conflict of interest there.
    Ha how on earth does having dyslexia relate to or affect being a surgeon!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    Yes it is. To get extra time you generally need something which is a proven disadvantage, it is literally there to level the playing field and as far as i know they've made it harder to get since i did gcse's . For me, I write at half the speed of most people and process information more slowly so if I didnt have it my grades would have been lower than what I m actually capable of.
    So why should you get extra time because you write slowly? Extra time should be only for students with actual legible issues, not because they might not be academic enough to process information as fast as others (I'm not saying you're not academic, just a point I'm raising) or because they write slowly.
    • Section Leader
    • Very Important Poster
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Very Important Poster
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by iMacJack)
    So why should you get extra time because you write slowly? Extra time should be only for students with actual legible issues, not because they might not be academic enough to process information as fast as others (I'm not saying you're not academic, just a point I'm raising) or because they write slowly.
    I have two diagnosed issues, I presume you've never heard of dyspraxia before?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Yes and no.

    If you have a genuine problem, then I'd say it's reasonably fair depending on how serious the problem is.

    If you have a stupid problem that isn't tied to a disability, then no. E.G. If you can't write quick enough, yet have nothing wrong with you, you shouldn't get extra time. If you can't write quickly, that's your own damn fault if nothing is wrong with you, stop acting like the world owes you a favour you so and so.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    It is fair, and quite right, but the system is routinely exploited.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by claireestelle)
    I have two diagnosed issues, I presume you've never heard of dyspraxia before?
    I have but that wasn't mentioned in the post!
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    There's so many ignorant comments on this thread! Wow. It's sad that people can't just be pleased that those who need help with their education are getting help and have empathy towards those that need help but aren't getting any. Consistently people on this thread are complaining that students regularly abuse the system. I can only speak from experience with my schools and college but when I was in education, extra time was minimal amongst students and the ones who I knew who told me the reasons why, genuinely needed it. I think there is just a lack of empathy and a lot of judgement. Can you really KNOW that these said students don;t need or deserve their extra time or other exam requirements. Yes there will be a few who do abuse the system, like with anything but people are talking about it as though it is a majority.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Compost)
    They do?

    Like most of these problems - and the reason it is impossible to make access arrangements fair for everyone - is that life is never as straightforward as we'd like it to be. You can get extra time for writing slowly. If you write slowly to make your handwriting legible then you can qualify for extra time. However, the recommended access arrangement for rubbish handwriting is a word processor.
    Yes they do. I don't know which schools/colleges you are referring to, but generally speaking, you won't be awarded extra time for messy handwriting, unless perhaps it's a consistent issue that's been affecting you for most of your school life. You can't just wait until exams and then say you want a laptop or a word processor. Doesn't quite work like that.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, unfortunately many people lie about their ailments to get it, which is unfair.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by ♥Samantha♥)
    I think there shouldn't be extra time after secondary school. Like why give extra time in university that's not teaching you to deal with real life. Like if your going to be say a doctor, if you have a dying patient who needs surgery you can't just go "soz I'm dyslexic give me 25% extra time to think this through".
    It doesn't work like that. If you are Dyslexic and do want to do medicine, they have to make reasonable adjustments.

    Also at my old school they would literally diagnose anyone with dyslexia because they got extra funding for every pupil with SEN. It was so annoying like some people obviously don't need it but get it anyway. In-school counsellors shouldn't diagnose kids there's a conflict of interest there.
    My college tried and failed to diagnose me with Dyslexia. (I have something like one symptom of it, which isn't enough to get a diagnosis)

    It's not actually the school who diagnose people. You can only be diagnosed by a qualified Educational Psychologist.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources

    Study tools

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Thinking about uni already?

    Thinking about uni already?

    See where you can apply with our uni match tool

    Student chat

    Ask a question

    Chat to other GCSE students and get your study questions answered.

    Creating

    Make study resources

    Create all the resources you need to get the grades.

    Planner

    Create your own Study Plan

    Organise all your homework and exams so you never miss another deadline.

    Resources by subject

    From flashcards to mind maps; there's everything you need for all of your GCSE subjects.

    Papers

    Find past papers

    100s of GCSE past papers for all your subjects at your fingertips.

    Help out other students

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.