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Should Cameron Resign? watch

  • View Poll Results: Should Cameron resign?
    Yes, Cameron should resign
    41
    40.59%
    No, Cameron shouldn't resign
    50
    49.50%
    Don't know enough facts or don't care
    10
    9.90%

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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    So for those who don't know what Cameron's father did was create a fund which invests in commodities. This firm was based in Ireland but registered in Panama (so it was actually avoiding the Irish tax system, not ours). This firm was a distributive fund which basically meant that all its profit was distributed each year to its investors which included Cameron. His shares when he sold in 2010 were worth £30k with a profit of about £20k of which he may or may not been liable for capital gains tax depending on the threshold.

    Basically, if either of you two have a workplace pension which invests in Twinings Tea (an Indian firm registered in Ireland for tax purposes) then your as guilty as Cameron was.



    True. The best plan would be a repeal but that would take months.
    Cameron said it was below capital gains tax threshold FYI.
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    (Original post by BaronK)
    Cameron said it was below capital gains tax threshold FYI.
    Then there's not a penny of UK tax that has been avoided.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I thought you became a Tory and then abandoned liberalism to become authoritarian. What's with the Labour support now?



    Technically i agree. Unfortunately, politics is imperfect and people will in many cases vote based on the leader.
    Fair enough. I would also add though that Cameron announced he wouldn't serve a third time before the last election so anyone who voted Tory did so in the knowledge (or ought to have had the knowledge) that there would be a different Tory prime minister before 2020.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    I thought you became a Tory and then abandoned liberalism to become authoritarian. What's with the Labour support now?
    I'll try and explain;

    Essentially I rejected rationalism and believe that society is more or less determined, we develop almost always empirically and thus free will is almost if not completely impossible. Liberalism and capitalism rely on rationalism as its theoretical basis and on my view it is simply false.

    If we were rational there wouldn't be overpopulation, wars, obesity, advertising and Jeremy Corbyn would be selling vegetables.

    I'm not an authoritrian: but I do believe in mixed government and I think the EU represents that dimension very well as does the HoL. To quote Churchill: 'the best argument against democracy is five minutes listening to your typical voter.

    In essence I'm an old school social Democrat/ Liberal in that I think there are limits to democracy and capitalism (before anyone starts yelling- unless they want The General Will or Privatised Armed Forces, so do they) humans are not rational and need to be managed to an extent if we ever really want to be free and begin to think rationally, (which I think we (and I include myself in this) are prevented from doing so.
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    (Original post by Davij038)
    I'll try and explain;

    Essentially I rejected rationalism and believe that society is more or less determined, we develop almost always empirically and thus free will is almost if not completely impossible. Liberalism and capitalism rely on rationalism as its theoretical basis and on my view it is simply false.

    If we were rational there wouldn't be overpopulation, wars, obesity, advertising and Jeremy Corbyn would be selling vegetables.

    I'm not an authoritrian: but I do believe in mixed government and I think the EU represents that dimension very well as does the HoL. To quote Churchill: 'the best argument against democracy is five minutes listening to your typical voter.

    In essence I'm an old school social Democrat/ Liberal in that I think there are limits to democracy and capitalism (before anyone starts yelling- unless they want The General Will or Privatised Armed Forces, so do they) humans are not rational and need to be managed to an extent if we ever really want to be free and begin to think rationally, (which I think we (and I include myself in this) are prevented from doing so.
    I agree. I quite like the House of Lords and EU. Something being elected does not necessarily make it better.

    Another example would be out Supreme Court, it's a lot better that they aren't elected so they don't have to make populist decisions and can instead be a lot more impartial and thorough.

    The House of Lords is particularly good in putting the breaks on governments which get a bit too excited and populist.
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    (Original post by Rakas21)
    It's also good to see a Labour supporter who can see what a loser you've elected, i find the attitude of some that it's better to be pure and have no power than in government to be extremely alarming and dangerous for British democracy.
    I didn't vote for Corbyn as a leader, and I was concerned about him (as I'm concerned about Bernie in the US) from the beginning of the campaign. I believe he has good intentions and I agree with a lot of his principles... But he pretty much lives in the fairytale world where we can get rid of nuclear deterrents and that taxes can be really high - and that just isn't an electable or sensible platform.

    I seem to be in the minority of labour members saying this, but I think electability should come first. As you've said, it's dangerous that people are happy to be a party of protest and nothing more (the #BernieOrBust campaign in the US reflects this). I've actually encountered people that are happy labour lost in 2015 - not because they support conservatives, but because it led to Corbyn being leader! I'd rather compromise on some values and actually get elected than let the opposition win and just shout on the sidelines about how we would have done it better.

    It's certainly an interesting time for politics.
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    (Original post by Jimmy Seville)
    He should. But this isn't nearly enough to force him out of office.
    Dodgy name there.
 
 
 
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