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Let's get this straight, laptops vs desktops Watch

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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    People should just get the computer that suits their individual needs. best for you doesnt make it the best for everyone.
    Quoting for best answer.

    Even if a laptop and desktop had identical performance there would still be a menagerie of factors that differentiate the two. Get what you need.
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    (Original post by Lawliettt)
    Can you not do all those things with a laptop? I certainly can lol.

    And aren't laptops generally cheaper? Even if they weren't, OPs scenario said you had infinite money lol

    I'm just saying in my opinion, OPs question only has one answer (hence why it's pointless).

    If he asked which do people prefer without any added variables then there'd be more room for debate.
    Well on the whole no. Upgrades are very limited with a laptop. You can't swap the mobo. You can't swap the CPU. You can't swap the GPU. Literally the only performance component you MIGHT be able to swap out is RAM. And I'm writing this on an XPS 13 which has RAM soldered to the board. So I can't even swap that out. There are exceptions but on the whole you can't upgrade laptop components.

    As for fixing them, that's just as much of a pain. Obviously stuff like resoldering a connection on the motherboard is best left to a professional (or at least someone experienced) but you can do so much more with a desktop. The ability to take components out and inspect them is vastly underrated. Granted odds are a desktop will have more hardware issues because you can build it yourself but it's still more of a pain to do repairs on a laptop.

    Laptops are not cheaper than desktops to get the same performance. In many cases you cannot match a desktop with a laptop. I might find that a low level laptop grade i7 matches a high desktop level i5. And a laptop 980 matches a desktop 970 (random example). But a laptop grade i7 and 980 will never match a desktop grade i7 and 980. Not to mention some desktop grade stuff simply isn't available in a laptop. I've never seen a laptop grade Xeon or Titan X. To get the same performance in a laptop you have to spend more money. That's never going to change because of things like cooling and space issues.

    If anything I have to say you've got it the wrong way round. If you take the OP's question and ignore all other variables then you'd go laptop. If performance is identical in a laptop and desktop then the laptop wins by being portable and smaller. It's when you introduce other variables (like battery life, upgrades, etc). that you can actual make an argument either way.
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    (Original post by AstroNandos)
    People spend that much on both desktops and laptops but they're definitely in a very small minority
    I want to see a £10,000 laptop. And one with £10,000 hardware in it. A diamond encrusted, gold plated chassis does not count. I literally can't think of any laptop you could buy for £10,000 and actually get your moneys worth in hardware. Laptop hardware seems to disappear past a few grand if I'm honest.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    On the whole external GPU docks are a slowly upcoming thing. The majority are not linked to a specific laptop and simply connect via Thunderbolt, allowing you to make use of the onboard RAM and CPU in your laptop but boost the GPU power with an external model. They also tend to work as hubs, offering multiple display outputs via the GPU, as well as additional USB ports and even things like gigabit networking. The Razor Core is one model but MSI, Asus and Alienware all have or will have models, to name a few.

    Providing you have a laptop with a Thunderbolt 3 port you can make use of them. The only exception I can think of was (I believe) from MSI. The laptop in question had a dedicated full size PCI x16 slot on the back of the laptop. You literally had to slot the laptop into the dock. That was a dumb idea and Thunderbolt works much better.

    Regardless though I would never suggest them to anyone. Yeah, they offer desktop level graphics cards to a laptop but they take away the portability. And they aren't far off the size of an Mini ITX sized case. If you're gonna be tethered to a box with your GPU then buy a small desktop. With a proper processor, RAM, etc. Because the externals docks aren't designed to be portable.

    The only time you benefit from them is if you've got a dock at all possible locations. For example do some stuff at work with a dock, take your laptop home and connect to a home dock. But then frankly I think a cloud solution or an old fashioned external hard drive does it better.

    Short of it is just buy a desktop. Desktops are better in every way besides portability. If portability means more than anything else then by all means get a laptop. External GPU docks are dumb on the whole.
    Thank you! Not to mention the max data rate that can be transferred with thunderbolt compared with PCI and the fact that the processor is built in meaning many GPU's will be bottlenecked
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    (Original post by TajwarC)
    Thank you! Not to mention the max data rate that can be transferred with thunderbolt compared with PCI and the fact that the processor is built in meaning many GPU's will be bottlenecked
    Indeed. Thunderbolt is impressive and most definitely does a good job supporting displays, USB and so on from a single port/cable. But PCI just does a better job for GPU's. Not sure what the exact data rates are though, iirc Thunderbolt 3 theoretical max is 40Gb/s, not sure on PCI.

    Not that you can ever truly take advantage of it when you're got a laptop grade processor. No sense having an external Titan when your CPU thermal throttles the moment you try to use it :/

    There's just all kinds of things that make them sub par.
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    (Original post by PaulACP)
    yeah, only reason to get a desktop is if you're making it powerful as **** for graphics work, gaming etc.
    Or if you don't need to use your computer on the move.

    Or if you have a tablet on which you can do all of your mobile computing.

    Or if you want something reasonably priced but that still performs well.

    Or if you want something you can hook up to your TV to run as a home theatre system.

    Or if you want something which will allow you to run any kind of in-home streaming system.

    And so on...
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    If anything I have to say you've got it the wrong way round. If you take the OP's question and ignore all other variables then you'd go laptop. If performance is identical in a laptop and desktop then the laptop wins by being portable and smaller. It's when you introduce other variables (like battery life, upgrades, etc). that you can actual make an argument either way.
    I think you've misread me or that was meant for someone else because that's exactly what I said. With OPs question (keeping in mind he said infinite money and identical performance), the laptop will always win. No one can argue otherwise.
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    - weigh more than ur mum
    - take up more space than ur mum

    Arguments over, folks
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I want to see a £10,000 laptop. And one with £10,000 hardware in it. A diamond encrusted, gold plated chassis does not count. I literally can't think of any laptop you could buy for £10,000 and actually get your moneys worth in hardware. Laptop hardware seems to disappear past a few grand if I'm honest.
    I can't find a laptop that's more powerful or more expensive than the MSI Titan the OP mentioned a page or two back with desktop class 980s in SLI, a genuine mechanical keyboard and generally ridiculous soec sheet. You could probably drive the price up by adding some insanely priced SSD and RAM, but beyond that I don't think anything more expensive exists with a price tag based on its components since there's nothing else that could be meaningfully improved upon with current generation hardware. Although I'm sure there's some custom manufacturer or designer who will make something stupidly overpriced for cosmetic changes or something.
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    Money no object? Id get one of those fat £2000-3000 gaming laptops with desktop i7 and 980 (MXM) chips in them . Desktop performance in a (heavy) laptop. Although you pay a premium.
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    (Original post by Lawliettt)
    I think you've misread me or that was meant for someone else because that's exactly what I said. With OPs question (keeping in mind he said infinite money and identical performance), the laptop will always win. No one can argue otherwise.
    Except that's exactly what I'm arguing. Even with infinite money and identical performance there are still factors that make desktops better than laptops. For example better keyboards, better storage options (because storage isn't a performance metric) and better/more displays.

    Even though some of that can be mitigated via peripherals, you then have a laptop that only matches a desktop when connected to those peripherals. At which point a desktop becomes the better choice. Without the peripherals the laptop isn't the better choice. So even based on just the OP's points you can still argue both ways. You have to ignore literally everything and only look at the laptop as a portable version of the desktop to be able to claim the laptop will always win.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    I can't find a laptop that's more powerful or more expensive than the MSI Titan the OP mentioned a page or two back with desktop class 980s in SLI, a genuine mechanical keyboard and generally ridiculous soec sheet. You could probably drive the price up by adding some insanely priced SSD and RAM, but beyond that I don't think anything more expensive exists with a price tag based on its components since there's nothing else that could be meaningfully improved upon with current generation hardware. Although I'm sure there's some custom manufacturer or designer who will make something stupidly overpriced for cosmetic changes or something.
    I think you'd probably be right there. It's most definitely more expensive than a desktop equivalent though. I was seeing a £4000 price tag for dual 980's, 8GB RAM, i7, etc. For the same money I could build a desktop with 980 Ti (or maybe Titans), at least 4x the RAM and an enthusiast processor like the 5960x.

    Either way this seems to be the max at the moment. No £10K laptops yet
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    A laptop with desktop performance would generally cost around double that of the corresponding desktop. So that makes the answer obvious
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    (Original post by xylas)
    If a desktop and a laptop have the same performance which one would you prefer? What reasons would you choose a desktop with worse performance over a laptop?

    Don't mention cost in your answers, assume money is infinite.

    Edit: Ok loads of varied answers to this thread. Responses tend to favour laptops in this scenario but there are good cases to be made either side.
    Laptops for uni defiantly a good call you'll probably have seen at uni a huge it room libraries with pc's in and the opportunity to borrow laptops like a library for computers.

    Sounds like a good deal right wrong you can't install things on these pc's for example if your doing computer game programming or design it would be found upon if you installed steam or something on your own PC you can do that same as if you did engineering and wanted to install sic lab or mat lab.

    That kin do f points to a estop and it's true you can do all of that on a desktop so why a laptop. well first of all laptops are portable so if is a nice day you can take it out in to a park or something or one of the outdoor places and work there it also helps if your doing group work and your over someone else's place you can get more done quicker if you go home you can take it with you without worrying oh I for got to put that in dropbox and if you ask a lecturer something about your assignment and need to show them instead of having to do it over e-mail you can do it in person .

    laptops are the way to go seriously
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    Why would I want a super-powered laptop that I can't actually put on my lap due to it being too heavy and with the thermal output of an industrial oven?
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    Since we seem to be allowed to hook this hypothetic laptop up to a monitor, keyboard, mouse, external drives, GPUs and so on (essentially making it a desktop) then why not go one step further.

    I choose a watch with matching specs to these laptops/desktops. Money is no object.
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    (Original post by offhegoes)
    Since we seem to be allowed to hook this hypothetic laptop up to a monitor, keyboard, mouse, external drives, GPUs and so on (essentially making it a desktop) then why not go one step further.

    I choose a watch with matching specs to these laptops/desktops. Money is no object.
    Why stop at a watch? Brain implant linked directly to your mind (great data transfer rates) controlled entirely by your thoughts (no need for peripherals) and it runs on your body energy (bye bye battery).

    Rather than find the smallest, best computer you can, make the computer a part of yourself. I don't think we can get much better.
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    Money no object? I'll get both. Obviously. In particular, I'll get a monster of a desktop with all the performance in the world, and a lightweight laptop that's actually portable.
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    Doesn't matter much, as its a pair of massively throttled Desktop 980 chips, as the combined TDP is too high for **any** laptop cooling solution to handle. Performance gains over 980M's is fairly meaningless.
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    (Original post by donutellme)
    On average, ignoring what you said about performance. I've ignored cost as well, but in reality, cost plays a huge factor.

    Desktops
    + no battery
    + more customisability
    + better components available
    + full sized graphics cards
    + more RAM
    + more storage
    + more memes
    + more peripherals
    + changeable peripherals
    + flexible setups
    + more performance possible
    - stationary unless you got wheels
    - weigh more than ur mum
    - take up more space than ur mum

    Laptops
    + can move them around
    + better for general use
    + lightweight
    - battery has to be charged
    - components are fixed
    - less powerful usually
    - no customisation
    You missed one, a laptop with the same power would experience degradation of it's components faster as a) they are necessarily smaller and b) the cooling system won't be as efficient (and isn't part of performance in terms of computing power)
 
 
 
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