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OCR Latin GCSE Official Thread 2016

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    (Original post by zoezoe123)
    If you forgot the superlative on plurimi, is that major or minor?
    In a past paper I did it was a major mistake but it might have changed!!
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    (Original post by sunny181113)
    Yup me
    Awesome! What do you think the 8 marker will be about? I prefer to prose to verse personally
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    It all made sense, but it was difficult in a few respects. There were a fair few words which I had personally never seen before- 'inrupit', which apparently means 'he violated/he broke in'.

    Also, did anyone definitely get what the clause with 'tum ventrem suum Anceto offerens exclamavit', or whatever it was, means?

    I couldn't work out where the offerens came in, due to the fact Anceto was not in the nominative, yet he was the one that had caused Agrippina to die...
    I translated that as "then, offering her stomach to Ancetus, she exclaimed..." I think that makes sense because she shouts "WOUND ME HERE!!!!"

    Offerens is a present participle so it would translate as 'offering'

    You're right, Anceto was not in nominative, it was dative I think because it follows the second declension, so it'd translate as 'to Ancetus' (or whatever his name was)

    And since "ventrum suum" was in the accusative, that was what she was offering

    Also Nero was a messed up emperor and this wasn't the first time he tried to kill his mum D:
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    (Original post by dance25)
    Awesome! What do you think the 8 marker will be about? I prefer to prose to verse personally
    Ohh 8 markers are not my favourite i think a comparison on their different views of love? Or something like what have they taught you about women in Rome?
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    (Original post by FThisSI'mOut)
    I translated that as "then, offering her stomach to Ancetus, she exclaimed..." I think that makes sense because she shouts "WOUND ME HERE!!!!"

    Offerens is a present participle so it would translate as 'offering'

    You're right, Anceto was not in nominative, it was dative I think because it follows the second declension, so it'd translate as 'to Ancetus' (or whatever his name was)

    And since "ventrum suum" was in the accusative, that was what she was offering

    Also Nero was a messed up emperor and this wasn't the first time he tried to kill his mum D:
    I know what the Latin meant for these lines but it didn't make any sense to me.So I messed up. My friend found out what actually happened. Agrippina wanted him to stab her in the stomach as Nero had grown there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agripp..._and_aftermath
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    (Original post by FThisSI'mOut)
    I translated that as "then, offering her stomach to Ancetus, she exclaimed..." I think that makes sense because she shouts "WOUND ME HERE!!!!"

    Offerens is a present participle so it would translate as 'offering'

    You're right, Anceto was not in nominative, it was dative I think because it follows the second declension, so it'd translate as 'to Ancetus' (or whatever his name was)

    And since "ventrum suum" was in the accusative, that was what she was offering

    Also Nero was a messed up emperor and this wasn't the first time he tried to kill his mum D:
    Yup that's exactly what I put
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    (Original post by fuzz13)
    Ah ok! On OCR can u find any past papers on Virgil because I think the one from last year must have been a different piece?!
    There is only 1 past paper for Virgil I think it was last year's one, our teacher gave it to us.
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    (Original post by 123Master321)
    What did everything get for the gerundive with the slaves, I got something like, "they overwhelmed the few slaves easily, who had been left behind for the purpose of saving the mistress"
    I thought it was a gerundive of purpose as it had ad in the sentence. I translated it as 'the few slaves who had stayed behind in order to protect their mistress were easily crushed.'

    I was stuck on 'relicti' though so I just put it as stayed behind.
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    I thought it was a gerundive of purpose as it had ad in the sentence. I translated it as 'the few slaves who had stayed behind in order to protect their mistress were easily crushed.'

    I was stuck on 'relicti' though so I just put it as stayed behind.
    If it was "were easily crushed" it would require a passive - but it was an imperfect subjunctive so:
    They entered the home so fast that they easily crushed a few slaves, who had been left behind to look after the mistress
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    I know what the Latin meant for these lines but it didn't make any sense to me.So I messed up. My friend found out what actually happened. Agrippina wanted him to stab her in the stomach as Nero had grown there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agripp..._and_aftermath
    O_O That is so messed up, at least we know where he gets his maniacal tendencies from

    We all make mistakes, don't worry about it, I know I screwed up the "servants staying back to protect their mistress" one

    We're just going to have to really push hard for Literature :/

    But I always say "If Frank Lampard, famous Chelsea striker and player of the English football team, can get an A* in his Latin GCSE, so can I"
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    I know what the Latin meant for these lines but it didn't make any sense to me.So I messed up. My friend found out what actually happened. Agrippina wanted him to stab her in the stomach as Nero had grown there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agripp..._and_aftermath
    The fact that I've enjoyed reading this denotes to me that I'm definitely doing AS Classics.
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    It all made sense, but it was difficult in a few respects. There were a fair few words which I had personally never seen before- 'inrupit', which apparently means 'he violated/he broke in'.

    Also, did anyone definitely get what the clause with 'tum ventrem suum Anceto offerens exclamavit', or whatever it was, means?

    I couldn't work out where the offerens came in, due to the fact Anceto was not in the nominative, yet he was the one that had caused Agrippina to die...

    I think it meant something along the lines of "then offering her stomach to Ancetus,she exclaimed..."
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    How is everyone feeling about prose literature next week?
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    (Original post by FThisSI'mOut)
    O_O That is so messed up, at least we know where he gets his maniacal tendencies from

    We all make mistakes, don't worry about it, I know I screwed up the "servants staying back to protect their mistress" one

    We're just going to have to really push hard for Literature :/

    But I always say "If Frank Lampard, famous Chelsea striker and player of the English football team, can get an A* in his Latin GCSE, so can I"
    That's always stuck in my mind, since I read that in a magazine, about Frank Lampard.
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    (Original post by AimingHighA*)
    How is everyone feeling about prose literature next week?
    I'm definitely more prepared for Prose than I am for Verse.

    Which texts are you doing?
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    I'm definitely more prepared for Prose than I am for Verse.

    Which texts are you doing?
    Yeah, I am also feeling way more prepared for Prose. I am doing Virgil, Caesar, Cicero and Tacitus- so lots to do and learn! Are you focusing on the translation or the lit crit?
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    (Original post by AimingHighA*)
    Yeah, I am also feeling way more prepared for Prose. I am doing Virgil, Caesar, Cicero and Tacitus- so lots to do and learn! Are you focusing on the translation or the lit crit?
    That is a lot! I'm doing Pliny [avunculus meus et tres feminae] and Nisus and Euryalus [Aeneid IX].

    I'm mainly focusing on, really, knowing the passages inside out; for me, there are parts that I can get just by thinking- ''nihil enim legit quod non excerperet''= For there was nothing from which he did not take extracts [Pliny- A Day In The Life], and some areas where I know where they're from but I won't know how to translate it.

    Then the lit crit [Never used that phrase- 'tis fantasticus!] comes as a by product.
    Being the only student means my teacher has literally given me the handbook- note use of the adverb 'literally' - from which I can learn the notes, and it's pretty easy. Then I can assign different bits to different aspects, making it fairly easy for me to say: "
    'Ooh, I know that chiasmus is used in this bit- timorem eius sua securitate- as a way of denoting that Pliny the Elder's actions and emotions are going against the social norms, fully outlining how he is keeping his duty as commander of the fleet- Misenum, at which he is stationed- whilst also maintaining his selflessness despite putting himself in danger, shown by even more chiasmus- festinat illuc unde alii fugiunt."

    You get the idea.
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    I thought it was a gerundive of purpose as it had ad in the sentence. I translated it as 'the few slaves who had stayed behind in order to protect their mistress were easily crushed.'

    I was stuck on 'relicti' though so I just put it as stayed behind.
    for the purpose of is another way of translating the gerundive of purpose
    yeah, relicti erant was had been left behind
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    (Original post by FThisSI'mOut)
    I translated that as "then, offering her stomach to Ancetus, she exclaimed..." I think that makes sense because she shouts "WOUND ME HERE!!!!"

    Offerens is a present participle so it would translate as 'offering'

    You're right, Anceto was not in nominative, it was dative I think because it follows the second declension, so it'd translate as 'to Ancetus' (or whatever his name was)

    And since "ventrum suum" was in the accusative, that was what she was offering

    Also Nero was a messed up emperor and this wasn't the first time he tried to kill his mum D:
    A few words, such as 'offero', are always followed by a dative rather than an accusative as you are offering something to someone.
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    (Original post by UmbralArbiter)
    I can dm you the questions if you'd like, but I can't find it online; I only have a physical copy.
    That would be brill! Thanks so much!
 
 
 
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