Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

A LEVEL maths is easy!!!!? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _Xenon_)
    Sorry for the title...

    I need to make a serious decision whether or not A level maths is for me. If you have done/are currently doing AS maths / A Level please tell me about what your maths GCSE grade was and how you find A level maths now. What grade are you working at/were working at in AS Maths and when did you start learning/revising the content yourself? How hard did you have to work to get to where you're at - How many hours for example every day or week?

    Any advice for me (a year 11 student who has almost completed GCSEs and is around a grade C/B student)?

    Many thanks.
    I'm currently just coming to the end of year 13 so therefore A2 maths. I was similar to you in that it was a big decision as I'm anything but naturally good at the subject, quite the opposite.

    Final GCSE grade: A (Just scraped an overall C after the individual modules in year 9/10 and then went on to get the A in both linear papers at the end of year 11)

    AS maths: B
    Core 1: B
    Core 2: A
    S1: C

    During AS learning the new content was quite intimidating when it was first introduced, especially during core 2 but keeping up with the homework and doing extra questions each week keeps you more than ahead. Whilst learning new content I spent about 5 hours on maths each week including homework and made a point of seeing my teacher with anything I struggled with (pretty sure he was sick of me by the end of the year) which was super helpful. I bumped it up to about 7/8 hours a week during the build up to exams and worked through as many past papers as possible. A word of warning, I was completely laid back with s1 and didn't really work on understanding it mostly because I hated it so much which explains the C. The final grade really reflects on how much work you do.

    A2 maths: C (predicted)
    I've struggled immensely this year with A2 maths and felt the jump up was much more significant than GCSE to AS. I've fallen behind with work on multiple occasions and have really let things get on top of me which explains the C. It would be entirely possible with the extra work but you really have to be prepared to step it up and keep going. A2 I found is a lot more reliant on a solid understanding of previous knowledge from the C3/C4 content. Also, there's lots of trigonometry, especially trig identities which can't really be taught, it's all about practice and perseverance. Make sure you do enjoy the problem solving nature of maths as there's less memorisation of methods and more thinking, the questions of course are much more demanding.

    Inevitably, the papers are getting more demanding each year. If you are going all out with revision and still getting B/C's at GCSE I'd think twice about maths. Only because there were a number of people with B's at GCSE last year in my class and only one is left now as they struggled so much. If you're prepared to work hard and genuinely enjoy maths though and aren't taking it because it looks good, give it a try. You should also talk to your teacher about this as they should know your capabilities better than anyone.

    All the best Feel free to ask if you have any further questions!
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    If I was going to give you advice from my own personal experience - never look up to those 'innate maths freaks' who seem to be born with a natural ability to do Maths. It is a common assumption to think that you have to be clever at Maths to become good at Maths. I strongly believe that no matter how weak somebody may be (and this specifically applies to Maths), if they work hard enough through the right means they will always have the potential to be very strong at the subject. Yes it's true it may take them a little longer to achieve their way but please understand that this always works IF you have the right time to work hard enough.

    Remember sometimes you may feel as though you've reached your limit of hardwork, but still don't see any improvement. However please don't let this put you off - as the reason why you can't improve will always be due to some gaps that you're missing. It may be too late to significantly improve on your grade this year, however you definitely have plenty of time to brush up on the areas which let you down for next year.

    There IS one condition to this however, and that is - the only way you'll be able to improve on an area is to genuinely enjoy and find interest in the subject. I can honestly tell you that if you don't TRULY enjoy Maths at this stage and you're technically only taking the subject because it is 'required' then please don't expect to acheive high grades.

    Don't get me wrong though because there are in fact ways to train yourself to enjoy the subject even if you may struggle with it at this stage. Frustration maybe the key factor which contributes to 'hatred' in Maths which is why I say you will have to work very hard to most importantly understand the work and hence avoid anything which may decrease your motivation for the subject.

    Indeed it is how much you love Maths that can set for high grades and not necessarily how much you can do the Maths initially. Therefore I would say if the case with you curently is where you enjoy Maths, definitely take it for AS because this will be enough motivation needed to improve your weaknesses. If it's vice versa but you still require Maths for your future course, make sure you go through training to enjoy the subject. And always remember if you understand the subject you will always enjoy it and feel a sense of satisfaction, hence achieving the highest possible grades through your hardwork. Just never give up and be patient because this takes time but with enough dedication it will ALWAYS work.

    (P.S: it is also extremely important to have a very good teacher ESPECIALLY with Maths compared to any other subject. Trust me teachers make a VERY big difference to your extent of understanding in Maths. )

    Please feel free to ask me any questions, and to further understand how you may want to improve certain aspects in Maths for both GCSE and AS level.

    Wishing you the best of luck!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    GCSE: A*

    I am taking both Maths and Further Maths and find maths really easy just because I think that it slowly eases you into the hard maths. This is especially for core 1 where a lot of the course you also do at GCSE. I also think that doing Further Maths and not finding it too difficult helps a lot.
    If you enjoy maths and are not too bad at it then it is not too hard to learn.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by meloj)
    I'm currently just coming to the end of year 13 so therefore A2 maths. I was similar to you in that it was a big decision as I'm anything but naturally good at the subject, quite the opposite.

    Final GCSE grade: A (Just scraped an overall C after the individual modules in year 9/10 and then went on to get the A in both linear papers at the end of year 11)

    AS maths: B
    Core 1: B
    Core 2: A
    S1: C

    During AS learning the new content was quite intimidating when it was first introduced, especially during core 2 but keeping up with the homework and doing extra questions each week keeps you more than ahead. Whilst learning new content I spent about 5 hours on maths each week including homework and made a point of seeing my teacher with anything I struggled with (pretty sure he was sick of me by the end of the year) which was super helpful. I bumped it up to about 7/8 hours a week during the build up to exams and worked through as many past papers as possible. A word of warning, I was completely laid back with s1 and didn't really work on understanding it mostly because I hated it so much which explains the C. The final grade really reflects on how much work you do.

    A2 maths: C (predicted)
    I've struggled immensely this year with A2 maths and felt the jump up was much more significant than GCSE to AS. I've fallen behind with work on multiple occasions and have really let things get on top of me which explains the C. It would be entirely possible with the extra work but you really have to be prepared to step it up and keep going. A2 I found is a lot more reliant on a solid understanding of previous knowledge from the C3/C4 content. Also, there's lots of trigonometry, especially trig identities which can't really be taught, it's all about practice and perseverance. Make sure you do enjoy the problem solving nature of maths as there's less memorisation of methods and more thinking, the questions of course are much more demanding.

    Inevitably, the papers are getting more demanding each year. If you are going all out with revision and still getting B/C's at GCSE I'd think twice about maths. Only because there were a number of people with B's at GCSE last year in my class and only one is left now as they struggled so much. If you're prepared to work hard and genuinely enjoy maths though and aren't taking it because it looks good, give it a try. You should also talk to your teacher about this as they should know your capabilities better than anyone.


    All the best Feel free to ask if you have any further questions!
    A-level maths really is quite abstract compared to gcse and i think thats why some people find it kinda hard to get their heads around. Hardly anything from gcse maths actually overlaps with level - either venn diagrams are completely different in s1 !
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _Xenon_)
    Sorry for the title...

    I need to make a serious decision whether or not A level maths is for me. If you have done/are currently doing AS maths / A Level please tell me about what your maths GCSE grade was and how you find A level maths now. What grade are you working at/were working at in AS Maths and when did you start learning/revising the content yourself? How hard did you have to work to get to where you're at - How many hours for example every day or week?

    Any advice for me (a year 11 student who has almost completed GCSEs and is around a grade C/B student)?

    Many thanks.
    I got an A at GCSE (Bs in all but one paper so I wasn't Getting As all the way through). I took maths at AS and A2 level. I found that AS was tricky, but that's only because I wasn't applying myself enough; I treated my exams like they were GCSEs still. I got a C at AS. I retook core 1 and 2 during A2, as well as doing C3 C4 and D1. I got 501/600 ums overall, which equated to a very high A maths isn't difficult if you apply yourself to it and also don't convince yourself it's difficult; just use books and physicsandmathstutor websites, as well as mathsnet.

    I would highly recommend taking maths for A level; a lot of courses do want maths, and even if they don't, it's always a big advantage!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mimiastc)
    It depends on the person 😂 I am doing as math and find it so much easier the igcse math
    I did a year of igcse maths and a year of GCSE maths; igcse maths was so difficult in comparison! The foundation stuff was the higher stuff in GCSE maths 😂😂 I remember the shock on someone's face back in year 11 when I knew how to solve a 'difficult' equation but couldn't for the life of me draw bloody graph things 😂
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by meloj)
    I'm currently just coming to the end of year 13 so therefore A2 maths. I was similar to you in that it was a big decision as I'm anything but naturally good at the subject, quite the opposite.

    Final GCSE grade: A (Just scraped an overall C after the individual modules in year 9/10 and then went on to get the A in both linear papers at the end of year 11)

    AS maths: B
    Core 1: B
    Core 2: A
    S1: C

    During AS learning the new content was quite intimidating when it was first introduced, especially during core 2 but keeping up with the homework and doing extra questions each week keeps you more than ahead. Whilst learning new content I spent about 5 hours on maths each week including homework and made a point of seeing my teacher with anything I struggled with (pretty sure he was sick of me by the end of the year) which was super helpful. I bumped it up to about 7/8 hours a week during the build up to exams and worked through as many past papers as possible. A word of warning, I was completely laid back with s1 and didn't really work on understanding it mostly because I hated it so much which explains the C. The final grade really reflects on how much work you do.

    A2 maths: C (predicted)
    I've struggled immensely this year with A2 maths and felt the jump up was much more significant than GCSE to AS. I've fallen behind with work on multiple occasions and have really let things get on top of me which explains the C. It would be entirely possible with the extra work but you really have to be prepared to step it up and keep going. A2 I found is a lot more reliant on a solid understanding of previous knowledge from the C3/C4 content. Also, there's lots of trigonometry, especially trig identities which can't really be taught, it's all about practice and perseverance. Make sure you do enjoy the problem solving nature of maths as there's less memorisation of methods and more thinking, the questions of course are much more demanding.

    Inevitably, the papers are getting more demanding each year. If you are going all out with revision and still getting B/C's at GCSE I'd think twice about maths. Only because there were a number of people with B's at GCSE last year in my class and only one is left now as they struggled so much. If you're prepared to work hard and genuinely enjoy maths though and aren't taking it because it looks good, give it a try. You should also talk to your teacher about this as they should know your capabilities better than anyone.

    All the best Feel free to ask if you have any further questions!
    If you haven't already, buy a Casio fx-991ES Plus calculator. It has a button to solve integration and differentiation. It's legal in exams as it only gives you an answer, but I found in core 3/4 last year (I got 87 ums), it really helped to stop silly mistakes. They're about £20, but definitely worth it!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gapyearstudent54)
    I did a year of igcse maths and a year of GCSE maths; igcse maths was so difficult in comparison! The foundation stuff was the higher stuff in GCSE maths 😂😂 I remember the shock on someone's face back in year 11 when I knew how to solve a 'difficult' equation but couldn't for the life of me draw bloody graph things 😂
    Really? I only ever knew igcse 😂 but i came from a south african system to half way through igcse so the work was very different so maybe thats why i found it harder then now.. Graphs🔫🔫🔫 i am quite good with numbers so i didnt like the wordy questions in igcse haha but grade boundries are low af ... I fot a A* for math and that year it was like 70 % to get a A*😂😂
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Mimiastc)
    Really? I only ever knew igcse 😂 but i came from a south african system to half way through igcse so the work was very different so maybe thats why i found it harder then now.. Graphs🔫🔫🔫 i am quite good with numbers so i didnt like the wordy questions in igcse haha but grade boundries are low af ... I fot a A* for math and that year it was like 70 % to get a A*😂😂
    That's because it's really difficult in comparison to normal! I was just so shocked when I moved back to the uk for year 11 that the stuff was so easy 😂 I think one of the topics my igcse teacher covered was actually one of the topics in c1 😂
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Yes its easy, even further maths - its just problem solving again and again and memorising, if you can do those well, there's no reason anyone cant do it
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gapyearstudent54)
    That's because it's really difficult in comparison to normal! I was just so shocked when I moved back to the uk for year 11 that the stuff was so easy 😂 I think one of the topics my igcse teacher covered was actually one of the topics in c1 😂
    Well atleast u had some backround knowledge for c1 😂👌🏻
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    (Original post by Mimiastc)
    Well atleast u had some backround knowledge for c1 😂👌🏻
    I know how to do differentiation, lol. I think it is C1 too but it is an IGCSE topic which isn't hard at all. I'm doing the edexcel IGCSE though which is piss easy.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    (Original post by Gapyearstudent54)
    I got an A at GCSE (Bs in all but one paper so I wasn't Getting As all the way through). I took maths at AS and A2 level. I found that AS was tricky, but that's only because I wasn't applying myself enough; I treated my exams like they were GCSEs still. I got a C at AS. I retook core 1 and 2 during A2, as well as doing C3 C4 and D1. I got 501/600 ums overall, which equated to a very high A maths isn't difficult if you apply yourself to it and also don't convince yourself it's difficult; just use books and physicsandmathstutor websites, as well as mathsnet.

    I would highly recommend taking maths for A level; a lot of courses do want maths, and even if they don't, it's always a big advantage!
    Thanks for the website suggestions and advice!! :-)
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gapyearstudent54)
    If you haven't already, buy a Casio fx-991ES Plus calculator. It has a button to solve integration and differentiation. It's legal in exams as it only gives you an answer, but I found in core 3/4 last year (I got 87 ums), it really helped to stop silly mistakes. They're about £20, but definitely worth it!
    Are those the famous graphic calculators???? Classmates treat it like a godsend, but is it all that..?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    GCSE:
    Maths: A
    Additional maths: A

    My individual modules at AS (UMS)
    C1: 98/100, A
    C2: 78/100 B
    M1: 92/100 A

    At A2 currently working around A's, few A*'s.

    C1 is the **** easy exam normally (sorry if I make it sound like I'm bragging) and is the non calculator paper. C2 and M1 I would say are harder (and I hated last years paper for C2 clearly). During the exam season I did EVERY SINGLE past paper my college had available and in one of the exams it went back to 2005.

    Early on in AS I was quite lazy as I basically did the homework and basic textbook revision but I got a range in homeworks and class tests of D's to B's. When I started doing past papers as revision (not loads at first) I was getting to A's. Basically do lots of past papers because some of the questions are hard in comparison to class tests.

    In A2 apart from C3 and C4 I'm doing D1. This year is pretty much the same in revision except that exam questions are far more horrific if you do not do past paper revision. There was a long question which then said the following: show that cos(4*veta) + 4cos(2*veta) = cos^4(veta)+3. That question first time was horrific for me and I got it wrong with like 15 lines of workings. Did it several months later with exam practice and I did it in about 5 lines.

    Maths you need to understand the formulas and how something works and then being able to apply it. If you don't understand something that you learn you need to clear it up with a teacher in a workshop etc and then you need to understand how to apply it since exam questions will make it far more complicated. If you struggle to understand topics and stuff already in maths you will have a very hard time at A level.

    Advice for revision: if you have one of those large textbooks with knowledge and recap questions along with exam style, skip the knowledge and recap questions. I also wouldn't even use the textbook that much to read up on knowledge, just ask your teacher if you don't understand something. In A2 (can't say much about my AS XD) my very early revision used the textbook, later on (and including later AS) I NEVER used the textbook for revision.
    Bloody hell you're smart haha I'm currently doing maths and further maths at A2 last year got A in maths and C in AS further. However, this year we have M1 and I have no idea what I'm going could I ask how you did so well and if you have any tips.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Arima)
    Are those the famous graphic calculators???? Classmates treat it like a godsend, but is it all that..?
    Not graphic, just like the normal but with the added button that's a godsend. It helped me a lot during core 3 and 4!
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Maths and Further Maths at A-Level are a bit of a joke, to be honest.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gapyearstudent54)
    Not graphic, just like the normal but with the added button that's a godsend. It helped me a lot during core 3 and 4!
    okay, i'll look it up on amazon its way cheaper than dem graphic calcs thank god
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    (Original post by Zacken)
    Maths and Further Maths at A-Level are a bit of a joke, to be honest.
    Because it is so easy or solid?
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _Xenon_)
    Because it is so easy or solid?
    Too easy, heck, they're so easy that the top unis ignore them and have to dish out their own entrance exams.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.